1400 in history

1400 events chronologically

Feb 14 Richard II dies, most likely from starvation, in Pontefract Castle, on the orders of Henry Bolingbroke
Mar 23 The Trần Dynasty of Vietnam is deposed after one hundred and seventy-five years of rule by Hồ Quý Ly, a court official
Sep 16 Owain Glyndŵr is declared Prince of Wales by his followers

Born in 1400

Jan 13 John Constable of Portugal a Portuguese infante of the House of Aviz, Constable of Portugal and master of the Portuguese Order of James. In Portugal, he is commonly referred to as the O Infante Condestável
Dec 25 John Sutton 1st Baron Dudley an English nobleman. A diplomat and councillor of Henry VI, he fought in several battles during the Hundred Years War and the Wars of the Roses, and acted as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland 1428–1430

Died in 1400

Jan 5 John Montacute 3rd Earl of Salisbury an English nobleman, one of the few who remained loyal to Richard II after Henry IV became king.
Jan 7 Thomas Holland 1st Duke of Surrey an English nobleman.
Jan 13 Thomas le Despenser 1st Earl of Gloucester the son of Edward le Despenser, 1st Baron le Despencer, whom he succeeded in 1375.
Jan 16 John Holland 1st Duke of Exeter an English nobleman, primarily remembered for helping cause the downfall of Thomas of Woodstock, 1st Duke of Gloucester and then for conspiring against Henry IV.
Feb 14 Richard II of England King of England from 1377 until he was deposed on 30 September 1399.
Oct 25 Geoffrey Chaucer widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages and was the first poet to be buried in Poet's Corner of Westminster Abbey. While he achieved fame during his lifetime as an author, philosopher, alchemist and astronomer, composing a scientific treatise on the astrolabe for his ten year-old son Lewis, Chaucer also maintained an active career in the civil service as a bureaucrat, courtier and diplomat. Among his many works, which include The Book of the Duchess, the House of Fame, the Legend of Good Women and Troilus and Criseyde, he is best known today for The Canterbury Tales. Chaucer is a crucial figure in developing the legitimacy of the vernacular, Middle English, at a time when the dominant literary languages in England were French and Latin