Died in 1630

Jan 26 Henry Briggs (mathematician) an English mathematician notable for changing the original logarithms invented by John Napier into common logarithms, which are sometimes known as Briggsian logarithms in his honour.
Feb 12 Fynes Moryson spent most of the decade of the 1590s travelling on the European continent and the eastern Mediterranean lands. He wrote about it later in his multi-volume "Itinerary", a work of value to historians as a picture of the social conditions existing in the lands he visited
Feb 26 William Brade an English composer, violinist, and viol player of the late Renaissance and early Baroque eras, mainly active in northern Germany. He was the first Englishman to write a canzona, an Italian form, and probably the first to write a piece for solo violin
Apr 10 William Herbert 3rd Earl of Pembroke the son of Henry Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke and his third wife Mary Sidney. Chancellor of the University of Oxford, he founded Pembroke College, Oxford with King James. He was warden of the Forest of Dean, and constable of St Briavels from 1608 to 1630. He served as Lord Chamberlain from 1615 to 1625. In 1623, the First Folio of William Shakespeare's plays was dedicated to him, together with his brother, Philip Herbert, 1st Earl of Montgomery
Apr 29 Agrippa d'Aubigné a French poet, soldier, propagandist and chronicler. His epic poem Les Tragiques is widely regarded as his masterpiece
Apr 30 Marcin Szyszkowski a notable Polish priest who attended the Jesuit school of Kalisz and became bishop of Lutsk, Płock and finally of Kraków. In the power of the Bishop of Kraków, he also became Prince of Siewierz
Jun 8 Alessandro Striggio the Younger an Italian librettist, the son of the composer Alessandro Striggio. The younger Striggio is most famous for his association with the composer Claudio Monteverdi. He wrote the libretto for Monteverdi's first opera Orfeo , a landmark in the history of the genre, as well as the ballo Tirsi e Clori. Striggio worked at the court of Mantua and died of the plague while on a diplomatic mission to Venice
Jun 10 Oda Nobukatsu a Japanese samurai of the Azuchi-Momoyama period. He was the second son of Oda Nobunaga. He survived the decline of the Oda clan from political prominence, becoming a daimyo in the early Edo period. Though often described as an incompetent general, Nobukatsu was a skilled warrior. In the battle of Komaki and Nagakute, he used a 13th century tachi of the Fukuoka Ichimonji school, to slay a samurai known as Okada Sukesaburō, therefore the blade was known as Okada-giri Yoshifusa, now a national treasure
Jul 26 Charles Emmanuel I Duke of Savoy the Duke of Savoy from 1580 to 1630. He was also nicknamed Testa d'feu for his rashness and military attitudes
Aug 5 Antonio Tempesta an Italian painter and engraver, whose art acted as a point of connection between Baroque Rome and the culture of Antwerp.
Sep 17 Thomas Lake Secretary of State to James I of England. He was a Member of Parliament in 1604, 1614, 1625 and 1626
Sep 18 Melchior Klesl an Austrian statesman and cardinal of the Roman Catholic church during the time of the Counter-Reformation. Klesl was appointed Bishop of Vienna in 1598 and elevated to cardinal in 1616
Sep 20 Claudio Saracini an Italian composer, lutenist, and singer of the early Baroque era. He was one of the most famous and distinguished composers of monody
Sep 22 Yuan Chonghuan a famed patriot and military commander of the Ming Dynasty who battled the Manchus in Liaoning. Of Cantonese origin, Yuan Chonghuan was known to have excelled in artillery warfare and successfully incorporated Western tactics with those of the East. Yuan's military career reached its height when he defeated Nurhaci and the Manchu army in the first Battle of Ningyuan. Later, Yuan also managed to defeat Nurhaci's son and successor, Huang Taiji, and his 200,000 mostly Mongol soldiers. However, Yuan was eventually tortured and executed by the Chongzhen Emperor under false charges which Huang Taiji was believed to have deliberately planted against him
Sep 25 Ambrogio Spinola 1st Marquis of the Balbases a Genoese aristocrat who served as a Spanish general, winning a number of important battles for the Spanish Crown. He is often called "Ambrosio" by Spanish speaking people and is considered one of the greatest military commanders of his time and in the history of the Spanish army
Oct 6 Thomas Walsingham (literary patron) a courtier to Queen Elizabeth I and literary patron to such poets as Thomas Watson, Thomas Nashe, George Chapman and Christopher Marlowe. He was related to Elizabeth's spymaster Francis Walsingham and the employer of Marlowe's murderer Ingram Frizer. This connection is one of the reasons offered for suggesting that Marlowe's death may have been linked with intelligence work, and not a dispute over a bill for food and accommodation, as in the coroner's verdict
Oct 6 Diego Fernández de Córdoba Marquis of Guadalcázar Viceroy of Mexico from October 18, 1612 to March 14, 1621 and Viceroy of Peru from July 25, 1622 to January 14, 1629.
Nov 15 Johannes Kepler a German mathematician, astronomer, and astrologer. A key figure in the 17th century scientific revolution, he is best known for his laws of planetary motion, based on his works Astronomia nova, Harmonices Mundi, and Epitome of Copernican Astronomy. These works also provided one of the foundations for Isaac Newton's theory of universal gravitation
Nov 18 Esaias van de Velde a Dutch landscape painter.
Nov 19 Johann Schein a German composer of the early Baroque era. He was born in Grünhain and died in Leipzig. He was one of the first to import the early Italian stylistic innovations into German music, and was one of the most polished composers of the period
Nov 29 Teodósio II Duke of Braganza a Portuguese nobleman. He is known for his allegiance to King Philip I of Portugal