1653 in history

1653 events chronologically

Jan 3 By the Coonan Cross Oath, the Eastern Church in India cuts itself off from colonial Portuguese tutelage
Feb 2 New Amsterdam (later renamed The City of New York) is incorporated
Apr 20 Oliver Cromwell dissolves the Rump Parliament
Jun 12 First Anglo-Dutch War: the Battle of the Gabbard begins and lasts until June 13
Dec 16 English Interregnum: The Protectorate – Oliver Cromwell becomes Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland

Top 7 most famous people born in 1653

Feb 17 Arcangelo Corelli an Italian violinist and composer of the Baroque era.
Mar 10 John Benbow an English officer in the Royal Navy. He joined the navy aged 25 years, seeing action against Algerian pirates before leaving and joining the merchant navy where he traded until the Glorious Revolution of 1688, whereupon he returned to the Royal Navy and was commissioned
Apr 2 Prince George of Denmark the husband of Queen Anne, who reigned over Great Britain from 1702.
May 8 Claude Louis Hector de Villars the last great general of Louis XIV of France and one of the most brilliant commanders in French military history, one of only six Marshals who have been promoted to Marshal General of France.
May 21 Eleanor of Austria Queen of Poland Josefa of Austria was, by her two marriages, Queen of Poland and Duchess of Lorraine.
Jun 22 André-Hercule de Fleury a French cardinal who served as the chief minister of Louis XV.
Sep 1 Johann Pachelbel a German composer, organist and teacher who brought the south German organ tradition to its peak. He composed a large body of sacred and secular music, and his contributions to the development of the chorale prelude and fugue have earned him a place among the most important composers of the middle Baroque era

Top 7 most famous people died in 1653

Feb 20 Luigi Rossi an Italian Baroque composer. Rossi was born in Torremaggiore, a small town near Foggia, in the ancient kingdom of Naples and at an early age he went to Naples. There he studied music with the Franco-Flemish composer Jean de Macque who was organist of the Santa Casa dell’Annunziata and maestro di cappella to the Spanish viceroy. Rossi later entered the service of the Caetani, dukes of Traetta
May 26 Robert Filmer an English political theorist who defended the divine right of kings. His best known work, Patriarcha, published posthumously in 1680, was the target of numerous Whig attempts at rebuttal, including Algernon Sidney's Discourses Concerning Government, James Tyrrell's Patriarcha Non Monarcha and John Locke's Two Treatises of Government. Filmer also wrote critiques of Thomas Hobbes, John Milton, Hugo Grotius and Aristotle
Jul 10 Gabriel Naudé a French librarian and scholar. He was a prolific writer who produced works on many subjects including politics, religion, history and the supernatural. An influential work on library science was the 1627 book Advice on Establishing a Library. Naudé was later able to put into practice all the ideas he put forth in Advice, when he was given the opportunity to build and maintain the library of Cardinal Jules Mazarin
Jul 31 Thomas Dudley a colonial magistrate who served several terms as governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Dudley was the chief founder of Newtowne, later Cambridge, Massachusetts, and built the town's first home. He provided land and funds to establish the Roxbury Latin School, and signed Harvard College's new charter during his 1650 term as governor. Dudley was a devout Puritan who was opposed to religious views not conforming with his. In this he was more rigid than other early Massachusetts leaders like John Winthrop, but less confrontational than John Endecott
Aug 10 Maarten Tromp an officer and later admiral in the Dutch navy. His first name is also spelled as Maerten
Sep 3 Claudius Salmasius the Latin name of Claude Saumaise , a French classical scholar.
Oct 3 Marcus Zuerius van Boxhorn a Dutch scholar. Born in Bergen op Zoom, he was professor at the University of Leiden. He discovered the similarity among Indo-European languages, and supposed the existence of a primitive common language which he called 'Scythian'. He included in his hypothesis Greek, Latin, Persian, Turkish, and Germanic languages, later adding Slavic, Celtic and Baltic languages. He excluded such languages as Hebrew from his hypothesis