1749 in history

1749 events chronologically

Jan 3 The first issue of Berlingske, Denmark's oldest continually operating newspaper, is published
Jan 3 Benning Wentworth issues the first of the New Hampshire Grants, leading to the establishment of Vermont
Jan 21 The Teatro Filarmonico in Verona is destroyed by fire. It is rebuilt in 1754
Apr 27 First performance of George Frideric Handel's Music for the Royal Fireworks in Green Park, London
May 19 King George II of Great Britain grants the Ohio Company a charter of land around the forks of the Ohio River
Jun 21 Halifax, Nova Scotia, is founded

Top 7 most famous people born in 1749

Jan 24 Charles James Fox a prominent British Whig statesman whose parliamentary career spanned 38 years of the late 18th and early 19th centuries and who was particularly noted for being the arch-rival of William Pitt the Younger. His father Henry, a leading Whig of his day, had similarly been the great rival of Pitt's famous father. Fox rose to prominence in the House of Commons as a forceful and eloquent speaker with a notorious and colourful private life, though his opinions were rather conservative and conventional. However, with the coming of the American War of Independence and the influence of the Whig Edmund Burke, Fox's opinions evolved into some of the most radical ever to be aired in the Parliament of his era
Mar 9 Honoré Gabriel Riqueti comte de Mirabeau a leader of the early stages of the French revolution. A noble, before 1789 he was involved in numerous scandals that left his reputation in ruins. However during the early years of the French Revolution he rose to the top and became the voice of the people. A successful orator, he was the leader of the moderate position, favoring a constitutional monarchy built on the model of Great Britain. When he died he was a great national hero, even though support for his moderate position was slipping away. The later discovery that starting in 1790 he was in the pay of the king and the Austrian enemies of France caused his disgrace. Historians are deeply split on whether he was a great leader who almost saved the nation from the Terror, or a venal demagogue lacking political or moral values, or a traitor in the pay of the enemy
Mar 23 Pierre-Simon Laplace an influential French scholar whose work was pivotal to the development of mathematics, statistics, physics, and astronomy. He summarized and extended the work of his predecessors in his five-volume Mécanique Céleste. This work translated the geometric study of classical mechanics to one based on calculus, opening up a broader range of problems. In statistics, the Bayesian interpretation of probability was developed mainly by Laplace
May 17 Edward Jenner an English physician and scientist who was the pioneer of smallpox vaccine, the world's first vaccine. He is often called "the father of immunology", and his work is said to have "saved more lives than the work of any other human"
Aug 28 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe a German writer and statesman. His body of work includes epic and lyric poetry written in a variety of metres and styles; prose and verse dramas; memoirs; an autobiography; literary and aesthetic criticism; treatises on botany, anatomy, and colour; and four novels. In addition, numerous literary and scientific fragments, more than 10,000 letters, and nearly 3,000 drawings by him are extant
Nov 17 Nicolas Appert the French inventor of airtight food preservation. Appert, known as the "father of canning", was a confectioner
Dec 17 Domenico Cimarosa an Italian opera composer of the Neapolitan school. He wrote more than eighty operas during his lifetime, including his masterpiece, Il matrimonio segreto

Top 7 most famous people died in 1749

Feb 1 Françoise Marie de Bourbon the youngest legitimised daughter of Louis XIV of France and his maîtresse-en-titre, Françoise-Athénaïs, marquise de Montespan. Originally known as the second Mademoiselle de Blois, that style eventually gave way to the name Françoise Marie de Blois. She married her first cousin Philippe d'Orléans in 1692 at the age of fourteen and bore eight children, four of which would have further progeny
Mar 12 Alessandro Magnasco an Italian late-Baroque painter active mostly in Milan and Genoa. He is best known for stylized, fantastic, often phantasmagoric genre or landscape scenes
Jul 3 William Jones (mathematician) a Welsh mathematician, most noted for his proposal for the use of the symbol π to represent the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. He was a close friend of Sir Isaac Newton and Sir Edmund Halley. In November, 1711 he became a Fellow of the Royal Society, and was later its Vice-President
Aug 29 Matthias Bel a Slovak Lutheran pastor and polymath from the Kingdom of Hungary. He is also known as the Great Ornament of Hungary. He described himself as "lingua Sla-vus, natione Hungarus, eruditione Germanus"
Sep 10 Émilie du Châtelet a French mathematician, physicist, and author during the Age of Enlightenment. Her crowning achievement is considered to be her translation and commentary on Isaac Newton's work Principia Mathematica. The translation, published posthumously in 1759, is still considered the standard French translation
Oct 26 Louis-Nicolas Clérambault a French musician, best known as an organist and composer. He was born and died in Paris
Dec 23 Mark Catesby an English naturalist. Between 1729 and 1747 Catesby published his Natural History of Carolina, Florida and the Bahama Islands, the first published account of the flora and fauna of North America. It included 220 plates of birds, reptiles and amphibians, fish, insects, and mammals, as well as plants