1757 in history

1757 events chronologically

Jan 5 Louis XV of France survives an assassination attempt by Robert-François Damiens, the last person to be executed in France by drawing and quartering, the traditional and gruesome form of capital punishment used for regicides
Mar 14 Admiral Sir John Byng is executed by firing squad aboard HMS Monarch for breach of the Articles of War
Mar 23 Capture of Chandannagar fort by British forces
May 6 English poet Christopher Smart is admitted into St Luke's Hospital for Lunatics in London, beginning his six-year confinement to mental asylums
May 6 The end of Konbaung–Hanthawaddy War, and the end of Burmese Civil War (1740–1757)
May 6 Battle of Prague – A Prussian army fights an Austrian army in Prague during the Seven Years' War
Jun 18 Battle of Kolín between Prussian forces under Frederick the Great and an Austrian army under the command of Field Marshal Count Leopold Joseph von Daun in the Seven Years' War

Top 7 most famous people born in 1757

May 30 Henry Addington 1st Viscount Sidmouth a British statesman, and Prime Minister from 1801 to 1804. He is best known for obtaining the Treaty of Amiens in 1802, an unfavourable peace with France. When that broke down he resumed the war but he was without allies and conducted a relatively weak defensive war. He is also known for his ruthless and efficient crackdown on dissent as Home Secretary 1812-1822
Jun 22 George Vancouver an English officer of the British Royal Navy, best known for his 1791–95 expedition, which explored and charted North America's northwestern Pacific Coast regions, including the coasts of contemporary Alaska, British Columbia, Washington and Oregon. He also explored the Hawaiian Islands and the southwest coast of Australia
Sep 6 Gilbert du Motier Marquis de Lafayette a French aristocrat and military officer who fought for the United States in the American Revolutionary War, and was a close friend of George Washington. Lafayette was a key figure in the French Revolution of 1789 and the July Revolution of 1830
Oct 9 Charles X of France known for most of his life as the Count of Artois before he reigned as King of France and of Navarre from 16 September 1824 until 2 August 1830. An uncle of the uncrowned King Louis XVII, and younger brother to reigning Kings Louis XVI and Louis XVIII, he supported the latter in exile and eventually succeeded him. His rule of almost six years ended in the July Revolution of 1830, which resulted in his abdication and the election of Louis Philippe, Duke of Orléans, as King of the French. Exiled once again, Charles died in Gorizia, then part of the Austrian Empire. He was the last of the French rulers from the senior branch of the House of Bourbon descended from King Henry IV
Nov 1 Antonio Canova an Italian sculptor from the Republic of Venice who became famous for his marble sculptures that delicately rendered nude flesh. The epitome of the neoclassical style, his work marked a return to classical refinement after the theatrical excesses of Baroque sculpture. Among Canova's English pupils were sculptors Sir Richard Westmacott and John Gibson
Nov 15 Jacques Hébert a French journalist, and the founder and editor of the extreme radical newspaper Le Père Duchesne during the French Revolution. His followers are usually referred to as the Hébertists or the Hébertistes; he himself is sometimes called Père Duchesne, after his newspaper
Nov 28 William Blake an English painter, poet and printmaker. Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake is now considered a seminal figure in the history of the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age. His prophetic poetry has been said to form "what is in proportion to its merits the least read body of poetry in the English language". His visual artistry led one contemporary art critic to proclaim him "far and away the greatest artist Britain has ever produced". In 2002, Blake was placed at number 38 in the BBC's poll of the 100 Greatest Britons. Although he lived in London his entire life , he produced a diverse and symbolically rich oeuvre, which embraced the imagination as "the body of God" or "human existence itself"

Top 7 most famous people died in 1757

Jan 9 Bernard Le Bovier de Fontenelle a French author. Isaiah Berlin said Fontenelle "was the most civilized man of his time, and indeed of most times." In 1935, the lunar crater Fontenelle was named after him
Mar 27 Johann Stamitz a Czech composer and violinist. His two surviving sons, Carl and Anton Stamitz, were scarcely less important composers of the Mannheim school, of which Johann is considered the founding father. His music is stylistically transitional between Baroque and Classical periods
Jun 28 Sophia Dorothea of Hanover a Queen consort in Prussia as wife of Frederick William She was the sister of George II of Great Britain and the mother of Frederick II of Prussia.
Jul 23 Domenico Scarlatti an Italian composer who spent much of his life in the service of the Portuguese and Spanish royal families. He is classified primarily as a Baroque composer chronologically, although his music was influential in the development of the Classical style and he was one of the few Baroque composers to transition into the classical period. Like his renowned father Alessandro Scarlatti, he composed in a variety of musical forms, although today he is known mainly for his 555 keyboard sonatas
Oct 17 René Antoine Ferchault de Réaumur a French scientist who contributed to many different fields, especially the study of insects. He introduced the Réaumur temperature scale
Oct 30 Osman III the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1754 to 1757.
Nov 17 Maria Josepha of Austria born an Archduchess of Austria, and from 1711 to 1713 was heiress presumptive to the Habsburg Empire. By her marriage to Augustus of Saxony she was the Electress of Saxony and Queen consort of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth