1764 in history

1764 events chronologically

Jan 19 John Wilkes is expelled from the British House of Commons for seditious libel
Feb 15 The city of St. Louis, Missouri is established
Sep 7 Election of Stanislaw August Poniatowski as the last ruler of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth
Oct 15 Edward Gibbon observes a group of friars singing in the ruined Temple of Jupiter in Rome, which inspires him to begin work on The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire
Nov 9 Mary Campbell, a captive of the Lenape during the French and Indian War, is turned over to forces commanded by Colonel Henry Bouquet

Top 7 most famous people born in 1764

Mar 13 Charles Grey 2nd Earl Grey Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 22 November 1830 to 16 July 1834. A member of the Whig Party, he backed significant reform of the British government and was among the primary architects of the Reform Act 1832. His government also saw the abolition of slavery in the British Empire. In addition to his political achievements, he has come to be associated with Earl Grey tea
Apr 13 Laurent de Gouvion Saint-Cyr a French commander in the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars who rose to Marshal of France and Marquis.
May 1 Benjamin Henry Latrobe best known for his design of the United States Capitol, on "Capitol Hill" in Washington, D.C., along with his additional later work on the Old Baltimore Cathedral/The Baltimore Basilica. The first Roman Catholic Cathedral constructed in the United States, was built on "Cathedral Hill" along Cathedral Street, between West Franklin and West Mulberry Streets in the future Mount Vernon-Belvedere neighborhood, then known as "Howard's Woods", a part of the country estate of "Belvidere" of American Revolutionary War hero and commander of the famed "Maryland Line" regiments of the Continental Army, Col. John Eager Howard, , who owned and donated much of the land north of Baltimore Town. The new Catholic Cathedral site was north of and overlooking the city's downtown business district and the "harbor basin" of the Patapsco River. In addition, Latrobe also designed the largest structure in America at the time, the "Merchants' Exchange", an H-shaped, three-story structure between East Lombard, South Gay, German , Second, and Water Streets which contained offices and wings for the Federal government - , numerous maritime businesses, shippers and law firms, along with some city government offices , and miscellaneous meeting and classrooms. With extensive balconied atriums through the wings and a large central rotunda under a low dome which dominated the city and was completed in 1820 after five years of work following the War of 1812 and endured into the early 20th Century, when it was replaced by the current U.S. Custom House, completed 1904-1905. Latrobe was one of the first formally trained, professional architects in the new United States, drawing influences from his travels in Italy, as well as British and French Neoclassical architects such as Claude Nicolas Ledoux
Jun 19 José Gervasio Artigas a national hero of Uruguay, sometimes called "the father of Uruguayan nationhood".
Jul 9 Ann Radcliffe an English author and pioneer of the Gothic novel. Her style is Romantic in its vivid descriptions of landscapes and long travel scenes, yet the Gothic element is obvious through her use of the supernatural. It was her technique " the explained supernatural," the final revelation of inexplicable phenomena, that helped the Gothic novel achieve respectability in the 1790s
Jul 19 Juan José Castelli an Argentine lawyer. He was one of the leaders of the May Revolution, which started the Argentine War of Independence. He led an ill-fated military campaign in Upper Peru
Sep 25 Fletcher Christian master's mate on board HMS Bounty during William Bligh's voyage to Tahiti for breadfruit plants. In the mutiny on the Bounty, Christian seized command of the ship from William Bligh on 28 April 1789

Top 7 most famous people died in 1764

Mar 30 Pietro Locatelli an Italian Baroque composer and violinist.
Apr 15 Madame de Pompadour a member of the French court and was the official chief mistress of Louis XV from 1745 to her death. She was trained from childhood to be a mistress, and learned her trade well. She took charge of the king’s schedule and was an indispensable aide and advisor, despite her frail health and many political enemies. She secured titles of nobility for herself and her relatives, and built a network of clients and supporters. She paid careful attention not to alienate the Queen, Marie Leszczyńska. She was a major patron of architecture and decorative arts such as porcelain. She was a patron of the philosophes of the Enlightenment, including Voltaire. Hostile critics at the time said she was responsible for the Seven Years' War, and generally tarred her as a malevolent political influence. Historians are more favourable, emphasizing her successes as a patron of the arts and a champion of French pride
Jul 16 Ivan VI of Russia proclaimed Emperor of Russia in 1740, as an infant, although he never actually reigned. Within less than a year, he was overthrown by the Empress Elizabeth of Russia, Peter I's daughter. Ivan spent the rest of his life as a prisoner and was killed by his guards during an attempt made to free him
Sep 12 Jean-Philippe Rameau one of the most important French composers and music theorists of the Baroque era. He replaced Jean-Baptiste Lully as the dominant composer of French opera and is also considered the leading French composer for the harpsichord of his time, alongside François Couperin
Oct 2 William Cavendish 4th Duke of Devonshire a British Whig statesman who was briefly nominal Prime Minister of Great Britain. He was the first son of William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire and Catherine Hoskins
Oct 26 William Hogarth an English painter, printmaker, pictorial satirist, social critic, and editorial cartoonist who has been credited with pioneering western sequential art.
Nov 20 Christian Goldbach a German mathematician who also studied law. He is remembered today for Goldbach's conjecture