1776 in history

1776 events chronologically

Jan 1 American Revolutionary War: Norfolk, Virginia is burned by combined Royal Navy and Continental Army action
Jan 10 Thomas Paine publishes his pamphlet Common Sense
Jan 27 American Revolutionary War: Henry Knox's "noble train of artillery" arrives in Cambridge, Massachusetts
Feb 27 American Revolutionary War: The Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge in North Carolina breaks up a Loyalist militia
Mar 2 American Revolutionary War: Patriot militia units arrest the Royal Governor of Georgia James Wright and attempt to prevent capture of supply ships in the Battle of the Rice Boats
Mar 3 American Revolutionary War: The first amphibious landing of the United States Marine Corps begins the Battle of Nassau
Mar 4 American Revolutionary War: The Continental Army fortifies Dorchester Heights with cannon, leading the British troops to abandon the Siege of Boston

Top 7 most famous people born in 1776

Jan 24 E. T. A. Hoffmann Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann , better known as T. Hoffmann, was a German Romantic author of fantasy and horror, a jurist, composer, music critic, draftsman and caricaturist. His stories form the basis of Jacques Offenbach's famous opera The Tales of Hoffmann, in which Hoffman appears as the hero. He is also the author of the novella The Nutcracker and the Mouse King, on which the famous ballet The Nutcracker is based. The ballet Coppélia is based on two other stories that Hoffmann wrote, while Schumann's Kreisleriana is based on Hoffmann's character Johannes Kreisler
Feb 11 Ioannis Kapodistrias a Greek Foreign Minister of the Russian Empire and one of the most distinguished politicians and diplomats of Europe. After a long career in European politics and diplomacy he was elected as the first head of state of independent Greece and he is considered as the founder of the modern Greek State, and the founder of Greek independence
Mar 10 Louise of Mecklenburg-Strelitz Queen consort of Prussia as the wife of King Frederick William III. The couple's happy, though short-lived, marriage produced nine children, including the future monarchs Frederick William IV of Prussia and German Emperor Wilhelm I
Apr 1 Sophie Germain a French mathematician, physicist, and philosopher. Despite initial opposition from her parents and difficulties presented by society, she gained education from books in her father's library and from correspondence with famous mathematicians such as Lagrange, Legendre, and Gauss. One of the pioneers of elasticity theory, she won the grand prize from the Paris Academy of Sciences for her essay on the subject. Her work on Fermat's Last Theorem provided a foundation for mathematicians exploring the subject for hundreds of years after. Because of prejudice against her gender, she was unable to make a career out of mathematics, but she worked independently throughout her life. In recognition of her contribution towards advancement of mathematics, an honorary degree was also conferred upon her by the University of Göttingen six years after her death. At the centenary of her life, a street and a girls' school were named after her. The Academy of Sciences established The Sophie Germain Prize in her honor
May 4 Johann Friedrich Herbart a German philosopher, psychologist, and founder of pedagogy as an academic discipline.
Jun 11 John Constable None
Aug 9 Amedeo Avogadro an Italian scientist. He is most noted for his contributions to molecular theory, including what is known as Avogadro's law. In tribute to him, the number of elementary entities in 1 mole of a substance, 6.02214179×1023, is known as the Avogadro constant, one of the seven SI base units and represented by NA

Top 7 most famous people died in 1776

Jan 14 Edward Cornwallis a British military officer who was the first Governor of Nova Scotia at Halifax, Nova Scotia. He later served as the Governor of Gibraltar
Mar 24 John Harrison a self-educated English carpenter and clockmaker. He invented the marine chronometer, a long-sought after device for solving the problem of establishing the East-West position or longitude of a ship at sea, thus revolutionising and extending the possibility of safe long-distance sea travel in the Age of Sail. The problem was considered so intractable, and following the Scilly naval disaster of 1707 so important, that the British Parliament offered the Longitude prize of £20,000. Harrison came 39th in the BBC's 2002 public poll of the 100 Greatest Britons
Apr 22 Yeongjo of Joseon the 21st king of the Korean Joseon Dynasty. He was the second son of Sukjong by Royal Noble Consort Suk of the Haeju Choi clan, and succeeded his older brother Gyeongjong as Prince after considerable controversy
Jun 10 Hsinbyushin king of the Konbaung dynasty of Burma from 1763 to 1776. The second son of the dynasty founder Alaungpaya is best known for his wars with China and Siam, and is considered the most militaristic king of the dynasty. His successful defense against four Chinese invasions preserved Burmese independence. His invasion of Siam ended Siam's Ayutthaya Dynasty. The near simultaneous victories over China and Siam has been referred to as testimony "to a truly astonishing elan unmatched since Bayinnaung." He also raised the Shwedagon Pagoda to its current height in April 1775
Aug 25 David Hume a Scottish philosopher, historian, economist, and essayist known especially for his philosophical empiricism and scepticism. He was one of the most important figures in the Scottish Enlightenment, and in the history of Western philosophy. He is the philosopher who is "widely regarded as the greatest who has ever written in the English language." Hume is often grouped with John Locke, George Berkeley, and a handful of others as a British Empiricist
Sep 22 Nathan Hale a soldier for the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. He volunteered for an intelligence-gathering mission in New York City but was captured by the British and executed. He is probably best remembered for his purported last words before being hanged: "I only regret that I have but one life to give for my country." Hale has long been considered an American hero and, in 1985, he was officially designated the state hero of Connecticut
Nov 17 James Ferguson (Scottish astronomer) a Scottish astronomer, instrument and globe maker.