1800 in history

1800 events chronologically

Jan 1 The Dutch East India Company is dissolved
Mar 21 With the church leadership driven out of Rome during an armed conflict, Pius VII is crowned Pope in Venice with a temporary papal tiara made of papier-mâché
Apr 2 Ludwig van Beethoven leads the premiere of his First Symphony in Vienna
Apr 24 The United States Library of Congress is established when President John Adams signs legislation to appropriate $5,000 USD to purchase "such books as may be necessary for the use of Congress"
May 15 King George III of the United Kingdom survives an assassination attempt by James Hadfield, who is later acquitted by reason of insanity
Jun 7 David Thompson reaches the mouth of the Saskatchewan River in Manitoba
Jun 14 The French Army of First Consul Napoleon Bonaparte defeats the Austrians at the Battle of Marengo in Northern Italy and re-conquers Italy

Top 7 most famous people born in 1800

Jan 7 Millard Fillmore the 13th President of the United States , the last Whig president, and the last president not to be affiliated with either the Democratic or Republican parties. Fillmore was the only Whig president that did not die in office or get expelled from the party, and Fillmore appointed the only Whig Supreme Court Justice. He is consistently included in the bottom 10 of historical rankings of Presidents of the United States. As Zachary Taylor's vice president, he assumed the presidency after Taylor's death. Fillmore was a lawyer from western New York state, and an early member of the Whig Party. He served in the state legislature , as a U.S. Representative , and as New York State Comptroller. He was elected vice president of the United States in 1848 as Taylor's running mate, and served from 1849 until Taylor's death in 1850, at the height of the "Crisis of 1850" over slavery
Feb 12 John Edward Gray a British zoologist. He was the elder brother of George Robert Gray and son of the pharmacologist and botanist Samuel Frederick Gray
May 9 John Brown (abolitionist) a white American abolitionist who believed armed insurrection was the only way to overthrow the institution of slavery in the United States. During the 1856 conflict in Kansas, Brown commanded forces at the Battle of Black Jack and the Battle of Osawatomie. Brown's followers also killed five slavery supporters at Pottawatomie. In 1859, Brown led an unsuccessful raid on the federal armory at Harpers Ferry that ended with his capture. Brown's trial resulted in his conviction and a sentence of death by hanging
Jul 31 Friedrich Wöhler a German chemist, best known for his synthesis of urea, but also the first to isolate several chemical elements.
Oct 25 Thomas Babington Macaulay 1st Baron Macaulay a British historian and Whig politician. He wrote extensively as an essayist and reviewer; his books on British history have been hailed as literary masterpieces
Oct 26 Helmuth von Moltke the Elder a German Field Marshal. The chief of staff of the Prussian Army for thirty years, he is regarded as the creator of a new, more modern method of directing armies in the field. He is often referred to as Moltke the Elder to distinguish him from his nephew Helmuth Johann Ludwig von Moltke, who commanded the German Army at the outbreak of World War I
Dec 3 France Prešeren a 19th-century Romantic Slovene poet, best known as the poet who has inspired virtually all later Slovene literature and has been generally acknowledged as the greatest Slovene classical author. He wrote some high quality epic poetry, for example the first Slovene ballad and the Slovene national epic. After death, he became the leading name of the Slovene literary canon

Top 7 most famous people died in 1800

Mar 21 William Blount an American statesman and land speculator, and a signer of the United States Constitution. He was a member of the North Carolina delegation at the Constitutional Convention of 1787, and led efforts in North Carolina to ratify the Constitution in 1789. He subsequently served as the only governor of the Southwest Territory, and played a leading role in helping the territory gain admission to the Union as the State of Tennessee. He was selected as one of Tennessee's initial U.S. senators in 1796
Apr 25 William Cowper an English poet and hymnodist. One of the most popular poets of his time, Cowper changed the direction of 18th century nature poetry by writing of everyday life and scenes of the English countryside. In many ways, he was one of the forerunners of Romantic poetry. Samuel Taylor Coleridge called him "the best modern poet", whilst William Wordsworth particularly admired his poem Yardley-Oak. He was a nephew of the poet Judith Madan
May 7 Niccolò Piccinni an Italian composer of symphonies, sacred music, chamber music, and opera. Although he is somewhat obscure, even to music lovers today, Piccinni was one of the most popular composers of opera—particularly the Neapolitan opera buffa—of his day
May 18 Alexander Suvorov the last Generalissimo of the Russian Empire.
Jun 14 Jean Baptiste Kléber a French general during the French Revolutionary Wars. His military career started in Habsburg service, but his plebeian ancestry hindered his opportunities. Eventually, he volunteered for the French Army in 1792, and rose through the ranks
Jun 14 Louis Desaix a French general and military leader. According to the usage of the time, he took the name Louis Charles Antoine Desaix de Veygoux
Jul 23 John Rutledge an American statesman, lawyer, and judge. He was a delegate to the Stamp Act Congress and the Continental Congress, President and then Governor of South Carolina during the American Revolution, a delegate to the Constitutional Convention of 1787, an Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, and second Chief Justice. He was the elder brother of Edward Rutledge, a signatory of the Declaration of Independence. Like nearly all important men in South Carolina at the time, he was a slaveowner