1851 in history

1851 events chronologically

Jan 28 Northwestern University becomes the first chartered university in Illinois
Feb 6 The largest Australian bushfires in a populous region in recorded history take place in the state of Victoria
Feb 12 Edward Hargraves announces that he has found gold in Bathurst, New South Wales, Australia, starting the Australian gold rushes
Mar 11 The first performance of Rigoletto by Giuseppe Verdi takes place in Venice
Mar 27 First reported sighting of the Yosemite Valley by Europeans
Apr 2 Rama IV is crowned King of Thailand
May 1 Queen Victoria opens the Great Exhibition in London

Top 7 most famous people born in 1851

May 20 Emile Berliner a German-born American inventor. He is best known for developing the disc record gramophone. He founded the Berliner Gramophone Company in 1895, The Gramophone Company in London, England, in 1897, Deutsche Grammophon in Hanover, Germany, in 1898 and Berliner Gram-o-phone Company of Canada in Montreal in 1899
May 21 Léon Bourgeois a French statesman. His ideas influenced the Radical Party regarding a wide range of issues. He promoted progressive taxation such as progressive income taxes and social insurance schemes, along with economic equality, expanded educational opportunities, and cooperatives. In foreign policy, he called for a strong League of Nations, and the maintenance of peace through compulsory arbitration, controlled disarmament, economic sanctions, and perhaps an international military force
Jul 8 Arthur Evans an English archaeologist most famous for unearthing the palace of Knossos on the Greek island of Crete and for developing the concept of Minoan civilization from the structures and artifacts found there and elsewhere throughout the eastern Mediterranean. Evans was the first to define Cretan scripts Linear A and Linear B, as well as an earlier pictographic writing
Aug 14 Doc Holliday remembered for his friendship with Wyatt Earp and his involvement in the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral
Sep 3 Olga Constantinovna of Russia the wife of King George I of Greece and, briefly in 1920, regent of Greece.
Oct 2 Ferdinand Foch a French soldier, military theorist and the Allied Généralissime during the First World War.
Oct 19 Empress Myeongseong the first official wife of King Gojong, the twenty-sixth king of the Joseon dynasty of Korea. In 1902, she received the posthumous name Hyoja Wonsŏng Jŏnghwa Hapchŏn Honggong Sŏngdŏk Myŏngsŏng Taehwanghu , often abbreviated as Myŏngsŏng Hwanghu , meaning Empress Myeongseong

Top 7 most famous people died in 1851

Jan 27 John James Audubon an American ornithologist, naturalist, and painter. He was notable for his expansive studies to document all types of American birds and for his detailed illustrations that depicted the birds in their natural habitats. His major work, a color-plate book entitled The Birds of America , is considered one of the finest ornithological works ever completed. Audubon identified 25 new species
Feb 1 Mary Shelley an English novelist, short story writer, dramatist, essayist, biographer, and travel writer, best known for her Gothic novel Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus. She also edited and promoted the works of her husband, the Romantic poet and philosopher Percy Bysshe Shelley. Her father was the political philosopher William Godwin, and her mother was the philosopher and feminist Mary Wollstonecraft
Mar 9 Hans Christian Ørsted a Danish physicist and chemist who discovered that electric currents create magnetic fields, an important aspect of electromagnetism. He shaped post-Kantian philosophy and advances in science throughout the late 19th century
Jul 10 Louis Daguerre a French artist and photographer, recognized for his invention of the daguerreotype process of photography. He became known as one of the fathers of photography. Though he is most famous for his contributions to photography, he was also an accomplished painter and a developer of the diorama theatre
Sep 14 James Fenimore Cooper a prolific and popular American writer of the early 19th century. His historical romances of frontier and Indian life in the early American days created a unique form of American literature. He lived most of his life in Cooperstown, New York, which was established by his father William. Cooper was a lifelong member of the Episcopal Church and in his later years contributed generously to He attended Yale University for three years, where he was a member of the Linonian Society, but was expelled for misbehaviour. Before embarking on his career as a writer he served in the U.S. Navy as a Midshipman which greatly influenced many of his novels and other writings. He is best remembered as a novelist who wrote numerous sea-stories and the historical novels known as the Leatherstocking Tales. Among naval historians Cooper's works on the early U.S. Navy have been well received, but they were sometimes criticized by his contemporaries. Among his most famous works is the Romantic novel The Last of the Mohicans, often regarded as his masterpiece
Nov 18 Ernest Augustus I of Hanover King of Hanover from 20 June 1837 until his death. He was the fifth son and eighth child of George III, who reigned in both the United Kingdom and Hanover. As a fifth son, initially Ernest seemed unlikely to become a monarch, but Salic Law, which barred women from the succession, applied in Hanover and none of his older brothers had legitimate male issue. Therefore, he became King of Hanover when his niece, Victoria, became Queen of the United Kingdom, ending the personal union between Britain and Hanover that had existed since 1714
Dec 19 J. M. W. Turner an English Romantic landscape painter, water-colourist, and printmaker. Turner was considered a controversial figure in his day, but is now regarded as the artist who elevated landscape painting to an eminence rivalling history painting. Although renowned for his oil paintings, Turner is also one of the greatest masters of British watercolour landscape painting. He is commonly known as "the painter of light" and his work is regarded as a Romantic preface to Impressionism. Some of his works are cited as examples of abstract art prior to its recognition in the early twentieth century