1858 in history

1858 events chronologically

Jan 9 Anson Jones, the last President of the Republic of Texas, commits suicide
Jan 14 Napoleon III of France escapes an assassination attempt
Jan 25 The Wedding March by Felix Mendelssohn is played at the marriage of Queen Victoria's daughter, Victoria, and Friedrich of Prussia, and becomes a popular wedding recessional
Jan 30 The first Hallé concert is given in Manchester, England, marking the official founding of The Hallé orchestra as a full-time, professional orchestra
Feb 11 Bernadette Soubirous's first vision of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Lourdes, France
Apr 10 After the original Big Ben, a 14.5 tonnes (32,000 lb) bell for the Palace of Westminster had cracked during testing, it is recast into the current 13.76 tonnes (30,300 lb) bell by Whitechapel Bell Foundry
Apr 16 The Wernerian Natural History Society, a former Scottish learned society, is wound up

Top 7 most famous people born in 1858

Apr 15 Émile Durkheim a French sociologist, social psychologist and philosopher. He formally established the academic discipline and, with Karl Marx and Max Weber, is commonly cited as the principal architect of modern social science and father of sociology
Apr 23 Max Planck a German theoretical physicist who originated quantum theory, which won him the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1918.
Jul 9 Franz Boas a German-American anthropologist and a pioneer of modern anthropology who has been called the "Father of American Anthropology".
Sep 16 Bonar Law a British Conservative Party statesman and Prime Minister. Born in the colony of New Brunswick , he is the only British Prime Minister to have been born outside the British Isles. He was also the shortest-serving Prime Minister of the 20th century, spending 211 days in office. He had a much longer tenure as Conservative Party leader, November 1911 to March 1921 and October 1922 to May 1923, where he used his business background to good advantage in promoting better organisation and efficiency. His lack of aristocratic family connections helped him broaden the base of the party to include more businessmen
Oct 27 Theodore Roosevelt an American politician, author, naturalist, soldier, explorer, and historian who served as the 26th President of the United States. He was a leader of the Republican Party and founder of the Progressive Party insurgency of 1912. He is known for his exuberant personality, range of interests and achievements, and his leadership of the Progressive Movement, as well as his "cowboy" persona and robust masculinity. Born into a wealthy family in New York City, Roosevelt was a sickly child who suffered from asthma. To overcome his physical weakness, he embraced a strenuous life. He was home-schooled and became an eager student of nature. He attended Harvard College, where he studied biology, boxed, and developed an interest in naval affairs. He quickly entered politics, determined to become a member of the ruling class. In 1881, he was elected to the New York State Assembly, where he became a leader of the reform faction of the GOP. His book, The Naval War of 1812 , established him as a learned historian and writer
Nov 20 Selma Lagerlöf a Swedish author. She was the first female writer to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, and most widely known for her children's book Nils Holgerssons underbara resa genom Sverige
Dec 22 Giacomo Puccini an Italian composer whose operas are among the important operas played as standards.

Top 7 most famous people died in 1858

Jan 5 Joseph Radetzky von Radetz a Czech nobleman and Austrian general, immortalised by Johann Strauss I's Radetzky March. General Radetzky was in the military for over 70 years to the age of 90, almost up to his death at age 91, and is known for the victories at the Battles of Custoza and Novara during the First Italian War of Independence
Jan 7 Mustafa Reşid Pasha an Ottoman statesman and diplomat, known best as the chief architect behind the Ottoman government reforms known as Tanzimat.
Mar 4 Matthew C. Perry a Commodore of the U.S. Navy and commanded a number of ships. He served in several wars, most notably in the Mexican-American War and the War of 1812. He played a leading role in the opening of Japan to the West with the Convention of Kanagawa in 1854. Perry was very concerned with the education of naval officers and helped develop an apprentice system that helped establish the curriculum at the United States Naval Academy. With the advent of the steam engine, he became a leading advocate of modernizing the U.S. Navy and came to be considered The Father of the Steam Navy in the US
Jun 10 Robert Brown (botanist) a Scottish botanist and palaeobotanist who made important contributions to botany largely through his pioneering use of the microscope. His contributions include one of the earliest detailed descriptions of the cell nucleus and cytoplasmic streaming; the observation of Brownian motion; early work on plant pollination and fertilisation, including being the first to recognise the fundamental difference between gymnosperms and angiosperms; and some of the earliest studies in palynology. He also made numerous contributions to plant taxonomy, including the erection of a number of plant families that are still accepted today; and numerous Australian plant genera and species, the fruit of his exploration of that continent with Matthew Flinders
Jun 17 Rani Lakshmibai the rani of the Maratha-ruled Jhansi State, situated in the north-central part of India. She was one of the leading figures of the Indian Rebellion of 1857 and for Indian nationalists a symbol of resistance to the rule of the British East India Company in the subcontinent
Oct 12 Hiroshige a Japanese ukiyo-e artist, considered the last great master of that tradition.
Nov 17 Robert Owen a Welsh social reformer and one of the founders of utopian socialism and the cooperative movement.