1867 in history

1867 events chronologically

Jan 8 African American men are granted the right to vote in Washington, D.C
Jan 31 Maronite nationalist leader Youssef Karam leaves Lebanon on board a French ship bound for Algeria
Feb 13 Work begins on the covering of the Zenne, burying Brussels's primary river and creating the modern central boulevards
Feb 28 Seventy years of Holy See-United States relations are ended by a Congressional ban on federal funding of diplomatic envoys to the Vatican and are not restored until January 10, 1984
Mar 1 Nebraska becomes the 37th U.S. state; Lancaster, Nebraska is renamed Lincoln and becomes the state capital
Mar 2 The U.S. Congress passes the first Reconstruction Act
Mar 29 Queen Victoria gives Royal Assent to the British North America Act which establishes the Dominion of Canada on July 1

Top 7 most famous people born in 1867

Mar 25 Arturo Toscanini an Italian conductor. He was one of the most acclaimed musicians of the late 19th and 20th century, renowned for his intensity, his perfectionism, his ear for orchestral detail and sonority, and his photographic memory. He was at various times the music director of La Scala Milan, the Metropolitan Opera in New York, and the New York Philharmonic Orchestra. Later in his career he was appointed the first music director of the NBC Symphony Orchestra , and this led to his becoming a household name through his radio and television broadcasts and many recordings of the operatic and symphonic repertoire
Jun 4 Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim a Finnish military leader and statesman. Mannerheim served as the military leader of the Whites in the Finnish Civil War, Regent of Finland , commander-in-chief of Finland's defence forces during World War II, Marshal of Finland, and the sixth president of Finland. In a Finnish survey 53 years after his death, Mannerheim was voted the greatest Finn of all time. Given the broad recognition in Finland and elsewhere of his unparalleled role in establishing and later preserving Finland's independence from Russia, Mannerheim has long been referred to as the father of modern Finland, and the Finnish capital Helsinki's Mannerheim Museum memorializing the leader's life and times has been called "the closest thing there is to a national shrine."
Jun 8 Frank Lloyd Wright an American architect, interior designer, writer, and educator, who designed more than 1,000 structures and completed 532. Wright believed in designing structures that were in harmony with humanity and its environment, a philosophy he called organic architecture. This philosophy was best exemplified by Fallingwater , which has been called "the best all-time work of American architecture". Wright was a leader of the Prairie School movement of architecture and developed the concept of the Usonian home, his unique vision for urban planning in the United States
Jun 28 Luigi Pirandello an Italian dramatist, novelist, poet and short story writer. He was awarded the 1934 Nobel Prize in Literature for his "bold and brilliant renovation of the drama and the stage"
Aug 3 Stanley Baldwin a British Conservative politician, who dominated the government in his country between the two world wars. Three times Prime Minister, he is the only premier to have served under three monarchs
Nov 7 Marie Curie a Polish and naturalized-French physicist and chemist who conducted pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the first person to win twice, the only person to win twice in multiple sciences, and was part of the Curie family legacy of five Nobel Prizes. She was also the first woman to become a professor at the University of Paris, and in 1995 became the first woman to be entombed on her own merits in the Panthéon in Paris
Dec 5 Józef Piłsudski a Polish statesman; Chief of State , "First Marshal of Poland" , and de facto leader of the Second Polish Republic, Minister of Military Affairs. From mid-World War I he had a major influence in Poland's politics, and was an important figure on the European political scene. He was the person most responsible for the creation of the Second Republic of Poland in 1918, 123 years after it had been taken over by Russia, Austria and Prussia. Under Piłsudski, Poland annexed Vilnius from Lithuania following Żeligowski's Mutiny but was unable to incorporate most of his Lithuanian homeland into the newly resurrected Polish State. He believed in a multicultural Poland with recognition of numerous ethnic and religious nationalities. His arch-rival Roman Dmowski by contrast called for a purified Poland based on Polish-speaking Catholics with little role for minorities

Top 7 most famous people died in 1867

Jan 14 Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres a French Neoclassical painter. Although he considered himself to be a painter of history in the tradition of Nicolas Poussin and Jacques-Louis David, by the end of his life it was Ingres's portraits, both painted and drawn, that were recognized as his greatest legacy
Jan 20 Nathaniel Parker Willis also known as P. Willis, was an American author, poet and editor who worked with several notable American writers including Edgar Allan Poe and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. He became the highest-paid magazine writer of his day. For a time, he was the employer of former slave and future writer Harriet Jacobs. His brother was the composer Richard Storrs Willis and his sister Sara wrote under the name Fanny Fern
Jun 19 Maximilian I of Mexico the only monarch of the Second Mexican Empire. He was a younger brother of the Austrian emperor Franz Joseph After a distinguished career in the Austrian Navy, he entered into a scheme with Napoleon III of France to rule Mexico. France had invaded Mexico in 1861, with the implicit support and approval of other European powers, as part of the War of the French Intervention. Seeking to legitimize French rule, Napoleon III invited Maximilian to establish a new Mexican monarchy. With the support of the French army and a group of conservative Mexican monarchists, Maximilian traveled to Mexico where he declared himself Emperor of Mexico on 10 April 1864
Jul 26 Otto of Greece a Bavarian prince who became the first modern King of Greece in 1832 under the Convention of London. He reigned until his deposition in 1862
Aug 25 Michael Faraday an English scientist who contributed to the fields of electromagnetism and electrochemistry. His main discoveries include those of electromagnetic induction, diamagnetism and electrolysis
Aug 31 Charles Baudelaire a French poet who also produced notable work as an essayist, art critic, and pioneering translator of Edgar Allan Poe. His most famous work, Les Fleurs du mal , expresses the changing nature of beauty in modern, industrializing Paris during the 19th century. Baudelaire's highly original style of prose-poetry influenced a whole generation of poets including Paul Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud and Stéphane Mallarmé among many others. He is credited with coining the term "modernity" to designate the fleeting, ephemeral experience of life in an urban metropolis, and the responsibility art has to capture that experience
Oct 23 Franz Bopp a German linguist known for extensive comparative work on Indo-European languages.