1874 in history

1874 events chronologically

Feb 16 Silver Dollar becomes legal US tender
Feb 21 The Oakland Daily Tribune publishes its first edition
Feb 28 One of the longest cases ever heard in an English court ends when the defendant is convicted of perjury for attempting to assume the identity of the heir to the Tichborne baronetcy
Mar 15 France and Viet Nam sign the Second Treaty of Saigon, further recognizing the full sovereignty of France over Cochinchina
Mar 18 Hawaii signs a treaty with the United States granting exclusive trade rights
May 9 The first horse-drawn bus makes its début in the city of Mumbai, traveling two routes
May 16 A flood on the Mill River in Massachusetts destroys much of four villages and kills 139 people

Top 7 most famous people born in 1874

Feb 3 Gertrude Stein an American writer of novels, poetry and plays. Born in West Allegheny , Pennsylvania and raised in Oakland, California, Stein moved to Paris in 1903, making France her home for the remainder of her life. A literary innovator and pioneer of Modernist literature, Stein’s work broke with the narrative, linear, and temporal conventions of 19th-century. She was also known as a collector of Modernist art
Feb 15 Ernest Shackleton an Anglo-Irish explorer who participated in four British expeditions to the Antarctic, of which he led three. During the first expedition 1901–1904, he and his companions Scott and Wilson set a new southern record by marching to latitude 82°S. During the second expedition 1907–1909 he and three companions established a new record Farthest South latitude at 88°S, only 97 geographical miles from the South Pole, the largest advance to the pole in exploration history. Also, members of his team climbed Mount Erebus, the most active Antarctic volcano. For these achievements, Shackleton was knighted by King Edward VII on his return home
Mar 24 Harry Houdini a Hungarian-American illusionist and stunt performer, noted for his sensational escape acts. He first attracted notice in vaudeville in the US and then as "Harry Handcuff Houdini" on a tour of Europe, where he challenged police forces to keep him locked Soon he extended his repertoire to include chains, ropes slung from skyscrapers, straitjackets under water, and having to escape from andhold his breath inside a sealed milk can
Apr 25 Guglielmo Marconi an Italian inventor and electrical engineer, known for his pioneering work on long-distance radio transmission and for his development of Marconi's law and a radio telegraph system. He is often credited as the inventor of radio, and he shared the 1909 Nobel Prize in Physics with Karl Ferdinand Braun "in recognition of their contributions to the development of wireless telegraphy". An entrepreneur, businessman, and founder in Britain in 1897 of The Wireless Telegraph & Signal Company , Marconi succeeded in making a commercial success of radio by innovating and building on the work of previous experimenters and physicists. In 1929 the King of Italy ennobled Marconi as a Marchese
May 29 G. K. Chesterton Gilbert Keith Chesterton, KC*SG better known as K. Chesterton, was an English writer, lay theologian, poet, philosopher, dramatist, journalist, orator, literary and art critic, biographer, and Christian apologist. Chesterton is often referred to as the "prince of paradox." Time magazine, in a review of a biography of Chesterton, observed of his writing style: "Whenever possible Chesterton made his points with popular sayings, proverbs, allegories—first carefully turning them inside out."
Aug 10 Herbert Hoover the 31st President of the United States. Hoover, born to a Quaker family, was a professional mining engineer. He achieved American and international prominence in humanitarian relief efforts in war-time Belgium and served as head of the U.S. Food Administration during World War As the United States Secretary of Commerce in the 1920s under Presidents Warren Harding and Calvin Coolidge, he promoted partnerships between government and business under the rubric "economic modernization". In the presidential election of 1928, Hoover easily won the Republican nomination, despite having no elected-office experience. Hoover is the most recent cabinet secretary to be elected President of the United States, as well as one of only two Presidents elected without electoral experience or high military rank. President Calvin Coolidge had famously asserted that "The business of America is business," and "pro-business" policies fostered an economic bubble that peaked in America in 1929, facilitating a landslide victory for Hoover over Democrat Al Smith
Nov 30 Winston Churchill a British politician and Nobel laureate who was the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. Widely regarded as one of the greatest wartime leaders of the 20th century, Churchill was also an officer in the British Army, a historian, a writer , and an artist. Churchill is the only British Prime Minister to have won the Nobel Prize in Literature since its inception in 1901, and was the first person to be made an honorary citizen of the United States

Top 7 most famous people died in 1874

Feb 9 Jules Michelet a French historian. He was born in Paris to a family with Huguenot traditions
Mar 8 Millard Fillmore the 13th President of the United States , the last Whig president, and the last president not to be affiliated with either the Democratic or Republican parties. Fillmore was the only Whig president that did not die in office or get expelled from the party, and Fillmore appointed the only Whig Supreme Court Justice. He is consistently included in the bottom 10 of historical rankings of Presidents of the United States. As Zachary Taylor's vice president, he assumed the presidency after Taylor's death. Fillmore was a lawyer from western New York state, and an early member of the Whig Party. He served in the state legislature , as a U.S. Representative , and as New York State Comptroller. He was elected vice president of the United States in 1848 as Taylor's running mate, and served from 1849 until Taylor's death in 1850, at the height of the "Crisis of 1850" over slavery
Mar 11 Charles Sumner an American politician and senator from Massachusetts. An academic lawyer and a powerful orator, Sumner was the leader of the antislavery forces in Massachusetts and a leader of the Radical Republicans in the United States Senate during the American Civil War working to destroy the Confederacy, free all the slaves and keep on good terms with Europe. During Reconstruction, he fought to minimize the power of the ex-Confederates and guarantee equal rights to the Freedmen
Jun 21 Anders Jonas Ångström a Swedish physicist and one of the founders of the science of spectroscopy.
Jun 22 Howard Staunton generally regarded as having been the world's strongest player from 1843 to 1851, largely as a result of his 1843 victory over Saint-Amant. He promoted a chess set of clearly distinguishable pieces of standardised shape—the Staunton pattern promulgated by Nathaniel Cook—that is still the style required for competitions. He was the principal organiser of the first international chess tournament in 1851, which made England the world's leading chess centre and caused Adolf Anderssen to be recognised as the world's strongest player
Sep 12 François Guizot a French historian, orator, and statesman. Guizot was a dominant figure in French politics prior to the Revolution of 1848, a conservative liberal who opposed the attempt by King Charles X to usurp legislative power, and worked to sustain a constitutional monarchy following the July Revolution of 1830. He then served the "citizen king" Louis Philippe, as Minister of Education, 1832–37, ambassador to London, Foreign Minister 1840–1847, and finally Prime Minister of France from 19 September 1847 to 23 February 1848. Guizot's influence was critical in expanding public education, which under his ministry saw the creation of primary schools in every French commune. But as a leader of the "Doctrinaires", committed to supporting the policies of Louis Phillipe and limitations on further expansion of the political franchise, he earned the hatred of more left-leaning liberals and republicans through his unswerving support for restricting suffrage to propertied men, advising those who wanted the vote to "enrich yourselves" through hard work and thrift. As Prime Minister, it was Guizot's ban on the political meetings of an increasingly vigorous opposition in January 1848 that catalyzed the revolution that toppled Louis Philippe in February and saw the establishment of the French Second Republic
Dec 7 Constantin von Tischendorf a world leading Biblical scholar at his time. He discovered the worlds oldest and most complete bible from 325 AD in 1844, with complete New Testament not discovered before. This bible is called Codex Sinaiticus, after the St Catherine Monastery, where Tischendorf discovered it and can be seen either in the British Library in London, or as a digitalised version in the internet. Tischendorf was made an Honorary Doctor by Oxford University 16.3.1865, and an Honorary Doctor by Cambridge University on 9.3.1865 following this find of the century. As student he gained his academic degree and international recognition when he deciphered the Codex Ephraemi Rescriptus, a 5th-century Greek manuscript of the New Testament, in the 1840s