624 in history

624 events chronologically

Mar 13 Battle of Badr: a key battle between Muhammad's army – the new followers of Islam and the Quraish of Mecca. The Muslims won this battle, known as the turning point of Islam, which took place in the Hejaz region of western Arabia
Mar 17 Led by Muhammad, the Muslims of Medina defeat the Quraysh of Mecca in the Battle of Badr

Born in 624

Feb 17 Wu Zetian a Chinese sovereign, who ruled officially under the name of her self-proclaimed "Zhou dynasty", from 690 to 705. She was the only female emperor of China in more than 4,000 years. She had previous imperial positions, however, under both Emperor Taizong of Tang and his son Emperor Gaozong of Tang, of the Tang dynasty of China. Wu was a concubine of Emperor Taizong. After his death she married his successor and ninth son, Emperor Gaozong, officially becoming Gaozong's furen in 655, although having considerable political power prior to this. After Gaozong's debilitating stroke in 690, Wu Zetian ruled as effective sovereign until 705. She is the only recorded woman to rule China in her own right

Died in 624

Mar 17 Amr ibn Hishām one of the Meccan polytheist pagan Qurayshi leaders known for his hostility against the Islamic prophet Muhammad and the early Muslims in Mecca. He was one of the arch-enemies of Muḥammad and the flag-bearer of disbelief and hatred towards Islam and the early Muslims. His malevolence and enmity was to such an extent that Muhammad gave him the title of ‘The Pharaoh of this Ummah’. Muhammad also said, “He who calls Abu Jahl 'Abu Hakam' has made a serious mistake. He should seek forgiveness from Allah for this.”
Apr 24 Mellitus the first Bishop of London in the Saxon period, the third Archbishop of Canterbury, and a member of the Gregorian mission sent to England to convert the Anglo-Saxons from their native paganism to Christianity. He arrived in 601 AD with a group of clergymen sent to augment the mission, and was consecrated as Bishop of London in 604. Mellitus was the recipient of a famous letter from Pope Gregory I known as the Epistola ad Mellitum, preserved in a later work by the medieval chronicler Bede, which suggested the conversion of the Anglo-Saxons be undertaken gradually, integrating pagan rituals and customs. In 610, Mellitus returned to Italy to attend a council of bishops, and returned to England bearing papal letters to some of the missionaries