April 14 in history

April 14 events chronologically

69 Vitellius, commander of the Rhine armies, defeats Emperor Otho in the Battle of Bedriacum and seizes the throne
70 Siege of Jerusalem: Titus, son of emperor Vespasian, surrounds the Jewish capital, with four Roman legions
193 Septimius Severus is proclaimed Roman Emperor by the army in Illyricum (in the Balkans)
966 After his marriage to the Christian Dobrawa of Bohemia, the pagan ruler of the Polans, Mieszko I, converts to Christianity, an event considered to be the founding of the Polish state
972 Emperor Otto II married Princess Theophano, niece of Byzantine Emperor John Tzimisces, leading to a significant impact on German intellectual life, including interest in Greek literature and Byzantine art
1028 Henry III, son of Conrad, is elected king of the Germans
1205 Battle of Adrianople between Bulgarians and Crusaders

Top 7 most famous people born on April 14

1126 Averroes the Latinized form of Ibn Rushd , full name ʾAbū l-Walīd Muḥammad Ibn ʾAḥmad Ibn Rušd , was a mediæval Andalusian Muslim polymath. He wrote on logic, Aristotelian and Islamic philosophy, theology, the Maliki school of Islamic jurisprudence, psychology, political and Andalusian classical music theory, geography, mathematics, and the mediæval sciences of medicine, astronomy, physics, and celestial mechanics. Averroes was born in Córdoba, Al Andalus , and died at Marrakesh in present-day Morocco. His body was interred in his family tomb at Córdoba. The 13th-century philosophical movement based on Averroes's work is called Averroism
1578 Philip III of Spain King of Spain and Portugal.
1629 Christiaan Huygens a prominent Dutch mathematician and scientist. He is known particularly as an astronomer, physicist, probabilist and horologist
1891 B. R. Ambedkar an Indian jurist, economist, politician and social reformer who inspired the Modern Buddhist Movement and campaigned against social discrimination of Dalits, women and labour. He was Independent India's first law minister and the principal architect of the Constitution of India
1892 V. Gordon Childe an Australian archaeologist and philologist who specialized in the study of European prehistory. Working most of his life as an academic in the United Kingdom for the University of Edinburgh and then the Institute of Archaeology, London, he wrote many influential books and was an early proponent of culture-historical archaeology and Marxist archaeology
1904 John Gielgud an English actor and theatre director whose career spanned eight decades. With Ralph Richardson and Laurence Olivier, he was one of the trinity of actors who dominated the British stage for much of the 20th century. A member of the Terry family theatrical dynasty, he gained his first paid acting work as a junior member of his cousin Phyllis Neilson-Terry's company in 1922. After studying at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art he worked in repertory theatre and in the West End before establishing himself at the Old Vic as an exponent of Shakespeare in 1929–31
1977 Sarah Michelle Gellar an American actress and producer. In 1983, she made her acting debut in the made-for-TV movie An Invasion of Privacy and went on to appear in Spenser: For Hire and Crossbow. Gellar had her first lead part in 1992's mini-series Swans Crossing and originated the role of Kendall Hart on the ABC daytime soap opera All My Children, winning the 1995 Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Younger Actress in a Drama Series

Top 7 most famous people died on April 14

1759 George Frideric Handel a German Baroque composer who spent the bulk of his career in London, becoming famous for his operas, oratorios, anthems and organ concertos. Born in a family indifferent to music, Handel received critical training in Halle, Hamburg and Italy before settling in London , and became a naturalized British subject in 1727. He was strongly influenced both by the great composers of the Italian Baroque and the middle-German polyphonic choral tradition
1917 L. L. Zamenhof the creator of Esperanto, the world's most successful constructed language, and a physician by profession. He grew up fascinated by the idea of a world without war, and believed that this could happen with the help of a new international auxiliary language which he first developed in 1873 while still in school
1925 John Singer Sargent an American artist, considered the "leading portrait painter of his generation" for his evocations of Edwardian era luxury. During his career, he created roughly 900 oil paintings and more than 2,000 watercolors, as well as countless sketches and charcoal drawings. His oeuvre documents worldwide travel, from Venice to the Tyrol, Corfu, the Middle East, Montana, Maine, and Florida
1935 Emmy Noether an influential German mathematician known for her groundbreaking contributions to abstract algebra and theoretical physics. Described by Pavel Alexandrov, Albert Einstein, Jean Dieudonné, Hermann Weyl, Norbert Wiener and others as the most important woman in the history of mathematics, she revolutionized the theories of rings, fields, and algebras. In physics, Noether's theorem explains the fundamental connection between symmetry and conservation laws
1950 Ramana Maharshi widely acknowledged as one of the outstanding Hindu gurus of modern times. He was born Venkataraman Iyer, in Tiruchuli, Tamil Nadu, South India, and given the name Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi in 1907, by one of his first devotees, Ganapati Muni. This would be the name by which he became known to the world
1964 Rachel Carson an American marine biologist and conservationist whose book Silent Spring and other writings are credited with advancing the global environmental movement.
1986 Simone de Beauvoir a French writer, intellectual, existentialist philosopher, political activist, feminist and social theorist. Though she did not consider herself a philosopher, she had a significant influence on both feminist existentialism and feminist theory. De Beauvoir wrote novels, essays, biographies, autobiography and monographs on philosophy, politics and social issues. She is known for her 1949 treatise The Second Sex, a detailed analysis of women's oppression and a foundational tract of contemporary feminism; her novels, including She Came to Stay and The Mandarins; and her lifelong relationship with Jean-Paul Sartre