Died on April 17

326 Pope Alexander of Alexandria 19th Pope of Alexandria & Patriarch of the See of Mark. During his patriarchate, he dealt with a number of issues facing the Church in that day. These included the dating of Easter, the actions of Meletius of Lycopolis, and the issue of greatest substance, Arianism. He was the leader of the opposition to Arianism at the First Council of Nicaea. He also is remembered for being the mentor of the man who would be his successor, Athanasius of Alexandria, who would become one of the leading Church fathers
485 Proclus a Greek Neoplatonist philosopher, one of the last major Classical philosophers. He set forth one of the most elaborate and fully developed systems of Neoplatonism. He stands near the end of the classical development of philosophy, and was very influential on Western medieval philosophy as well as Islamic thought
656 Peada of Mercia briefly King of southern Mercia after his father's death in November 655 until his own death in the spring of the next year.
744 Al-Walid II an Umayyad caliph who ruled from 743 until 744. He succeeded his uncle, Hisham ibn Abd al-Malik
818 Bernard of Italy the King of the Lombards from 810 to 818. He plotted against his uncle, Emperor Louis the Pious, when the latter's Ordinatio Imperii made Bernard a vassal of his cousin Lothair. When his plot was discovered, Louis had him blinded, a procedure which killed him
858 Pope Benedict III Pope from 29 September 855 to his death in 858.
1080 Harald III of Denmark King of Denmark from 1074 to 1080. Harald III was an illegitimate son of Danish king Sweyn II Estridsson, and contested the crown with some of his brothers. He was a peaceful ruler who initiated a number of reforms. Harald was married to his cousin Margareta Hasbjörnsdatter, but did not leave any heirs, and was succeeded by his brother Canute IV the Saint. Four of his half-brothers were in turn crowned Danish kings
1111 Robert of Molesme a Christian saint and abbot, one of the founders of the Cistercian Order in France.
1271 Isabella of France Queen of Navarre a daughter of Louis IX of France and Margaret of Provence. She was married to Theobald II of Navarre, eldest son of Theobald I of Navarre and Margaret of Navarre on 6 April 1255. Isabelle became Queen consort of Navarre
1355 Marino Faliero the fifty-fifth Doge of Venice, appointed on 11 September 1354. He was sometimes referred to simply as Marin Falier or Falieri
1427 John IV Duke of Brabant the son of Antoine of Burgundy, Duke of Brabant, Lothier and Limburg and his first wife Jeanne of Saint-Pol. He was the second Brabantian ruler from the House of Valois
1515 Meñli I Giray a khan of the Crimean Khanate and the sixth son of Hacı I Giray.
1539 George Duke of Saxony duke of Saxony from 1500 to 1539.
1574 Joachim Camerarius a German classical scholar.
1622 Richard Hawkins a 17th-century English seaman, explorer and Elizabethan "Sea Dog", and the son of Admiral Sir John Hawkins.
1669 Antonio Bertali an Italian composer and violinist of the Baroque era.
1679 Jan van Kessel the Elder a Flemish painter of still lifes and Jan Brueghel the Elder's grandson.
1680 Kateri Tekakwitha a Roman Catholic saint who was an Algonquin–Mohawk virgin and laywoman. Born in Auriesville , she suffered from smallpox as a young child which scarred her face and made her eyes weakened greatly. She converted to Roman Catholicism at age nineteen and was renamed Kateri. She settled for the remaining years of her life at the Jesuit mission village of Kahnawake, south of Montreal in New France, now Canada
1695 Juana Inés de la Cruz Sister Juana Inés de la Cruz, O.S.H. was a self-taught scholar and poet of the Baroque school, and Hieronymite nun of New Spain, known in her lifetime as "The Tenth Muse." Although she lived in a colonial era when Mexico was part of the Spanish Empire, she is considered today both a Mexican writer and a contributor to the Spanish Golden Age, and she stands at the beginning of the history of Mexican literature in the Spanish language
1696 Marie de Rabutin-Chantal marquise de Sévigné a French aristocrat, remembered for her letter-writing. Most of her letters, celebrated for their wit and vividness, were addressed to her daughter. She is revered in France as one of the great icons of French literature
1704 Ulrik Frederik Gyldenløve conventionally named the "Gyldenløve War" after him. He was an acknowledged illegitimate son of King Frederick III of Denmark and Norway
1705 Johann Paul von Westhoff a German Baroque composer and violinist. One of the most important exponents of the Dresden violin school, he was among the highest ranked violinists of his day, and composed some of the earliest known music for solo violin. He worked as musician and composer as a member of Dresden's Hofkapelle and at the Weimar court , and was also active as a teacher of contemporary languages
1711 Joseph I Holy Roman Emperor Holy Roman Emperor from 1705 until his death in 1711. He was the eldest son of Emperor Leopold I from his third wife, Eleonor Magdalene of Neuburg. Joseph was crowned King of Hungary at the age of nine in 1687, and King in Germany at the age of eleven in 1690. He succeeded to the imperial throne and that of Bohemia when his father died
1714 Philipp Heinrich Erlebach a German Baroque composer.
1742 Arvid Horn a Swedish soldier, diplomat and politician. He served twice as President of the Privy Council Chancellery and was one of the leading figures of the Swedish Age of Liberty
1764 Johann Mattheson a German composer, singer, writer, lexicographer, diplomat and music theorist.
1783 Louise d'Épinay a French writer, a saloniste and woman of fashion, known on account of her liaisons with Friedrich Melchior, Baron von Grimm, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, who gives malicious reports of her in his Confessions. and her acquaintanceship with Denis Diderot, Jean le Rond d'Alembert, Baron d'Holbach and other French men of letters during the Enlightenment. She was also one of many women referenced in Simone de Beauvoir's Second Sex as an example of noble expansion of women's rights during the 18th century
1790 Benjamin Franklin one of the Founding Fathers of the United States and in many ways was "the First American". A renowned polymath, Franklin was a leading author, printer, political theorist, politician, postmaster, scientist, inventor, civic activist, statesman, and diplomat. As a scientist, he was a major figure in the American Enlightenment and the history of physics for his discoveries and theories regarding electricity. As an inventor, he is known for the lightning rod, bifocals, and the Franklin stove, among other inventions. He facilitated many civic organizations, including Philadelphia's fire department and a university
1799 Richard Jupp an 18th-century English architect, particularly associated with buildings in and around London.
1807 Princess Leopoldina of Savoy a Princess of Savoy and later the Princess of Melfi, as wife of Giovanni Andrea VI Doria-Pamphilj-Landi, Prince of Melfi. She was the older sister of the princesse de Lamballe
1809 Johann Christian Kittel a German organist, composer, and teacher. He was one of the last students of Johann Sebastian Bach. His students included Michael Gotthard Fischer, Karl Gottlieb Umbreit, Johann Wilhelm Hässler and Christian Heinrich Rinck
1822 Dmitry Levitzky a Russian-Ukrainian portrait painter.
1825 Henry Fuseli a Swiss painter, draughtsman and writer on art who spent much of his life in Britain. Many of his works, such as The Nightmare deal with supernatural subject-matter. He painted works for John Boydell's Shakespeare Gallery, and created his own "Milton Gallery". He held the posts of Professor of Painting and Keeper at the Royal Academy. His style had a considerable influence on many younger British artists, including William Blake
1827 Paul Grenier joined the French royal army and rapidly rose to general officer rank during the French Revolutionary Wars. He led a division in the 1796-1797 campaign in southern Germany. During the 1800 campaign in the Electorate of Bavaria he was a wing commander. Beginning in 1809, in the Napoleonic Wars, Emperor Napoleon I entrusted him with corps commands in the Italian theater. A skilled tactician, he was one of the veteran generals who made the Napoleonic armies such a formidable foe to the other European powers. After the Bourbon Restoration he retired from the army and later went into politics. Grenier is one of the Names inscribed under the Arc de Triomphe
1831 Dmitry Senyavin a Russian admiral who ranks among the greatest seamen of the Napoleonic Wars.
1835 William Henry Ireland an English forger of would-be Shakespearean documents and plays. He is less well known as a poet, writer of gothic novels and histories. Although he was apparently christened William-Henry, he was known as Samuel through much of his life , and many sources list his name as Samuel William Henry Ireland
1838 Johanna Schopenhauer a German author. She is today known primarily for being the mother of Arthur Schopenhauer
1839 Marie Friederike of Hesse-Kassel a German noblewoman and by marriage Princess and later Duchess of Anhalt-Bernburg.
1840 Hannah Webster Foster an American novelist.
1843 Samuel Morey an American inventor, who worked on early internal combustion engines and was a pioneer in steamships who accumulated a total of 20 patents.
1852 Étienne Maurice Gérard a French general and statesman. He served under a succession of French governments including the ancien regime monarchy, the Revolutionary governments, the Restorations, the July Monarchy, the First and Second Republics, and the First Empire , becoming Prime Minister briefly in 1834
1858 James Abercromby 1st Baron Dunfermline a British barrister and Whig politician. He served as Speaker of the House of Commons between 1835 and 1839
1863 John Colborne 1st Baron Seaton a British Army officer and Colonial Governor. After taking part as a junior officer in the Anglo-Russian invasion of Holland, Sir Ralph Abercromby's expedition to Egypt and then the War of the Third Coalition, he served as military secretary to Sir John Moore at the Battle of Corunna. He then commanded the 2nd Battalion of the 66th Regiment of Foot and, later, the 52nd Regiment of Foot at many of the battles of the Peninsular War. At the Battle of Waterloo, Colborne on his own initiative brought the 52nd Regiment of Foot forward, took up a flanking position in relation to the French Imperial Guard and then, after firing repeated volleys into their flank, charged at the Guard so driving them back in disorder. He went on to become commander-in-chief of all the armed forces in British North America, personally leading the offensive at the Battle of Saint-Eustache in Lower Canada and defeating the rebel force in December 1837. After that he was high commissioner of the Ionian Islands and then Commander-in-Chief, Ireland
1870 Marie-Caroline de Bourbon-Sicile duchess de Berry the daughter of the future King Francis I of the Two Sicilies and his first wife, Maria Clementina of Austria.
1873 Semen Hulak-Artemovsky a Ukrainian opera composer, singer , actor, and dramatist who lived and worked in Imperial Russia.
1877 David Spence (VC) a Scottish recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.
1882 George Jennings an English sanitary engineer and plumber who invented the first public flush toilets.
1885 John Marston (sailor) an officer in the United States Navy.
1887 Thomas Gore Browne a British colonial administrator, who was Governor of St Helena, Governor of New Zealand, Governor of Tasmania and Governor of Bermuda.
1888 E. G. Squier an American archaeologist and newspaper editor.