April 18 in history

April 18 events chronologically

1025 Bolesław Chrobry is crowned in Gniezno, becoming the first King of Poland
1506 The cornerstone of the current St. Peter's Basilica is laid
1518 Bona Sforza is crowned as queen consort of Poland
1521 Trial of Martin Luther begins its second day during the assembly of the Diet of Worms. He refuses to recant his teachings despite the risk of excommunication
1689 Bostonians rise up in rebellion against Sir Edmund Andros
1738 Real Academia de la Historia ("Royal Academy of History") is founded in Madrid
1775 American Revolution: The British advancement by sea begins; Paul Revere and other riders warn the countryside of the troop movements

Top 7 most famous people born on April 18

1772 David Ricardo a British political economist. He was one of the most influential of the classical economists, along with Thomas Malthus, Adam Smith, and James Mill. He began his professional life as a broker and financial market speculator. He amassed a considerable personal fortune, largely from financial market speculation and, having retired, bought a seat in the U.K. Parliament. He held his parliamentary seat for the last four years of his life. Perhaps his most important legacy is his theory of comparative advantage, which suggests that a nation should concentrate its resources solely in industries where it is most internationally competitive and trade with other countries to obtain products not produced nationally. In essence, Ricardo promoted the idea of extreme industry specialization by nations, to the point of dismantling internationally competitive and otherwise profitable industries. In this thinking Ricardo assumed the existence of a national industry policy aimed at promoting some industries to the detriment of others. For Ricardo some form of Central Economic Planning was a given. Ricardo's theory of comparative advantage has been challenged by, among others, Joan Robinson and Piero Sraffa, but remains the cornerstone of the argument in favour of international free trade as a means of increasing economic prosperity. The theory of comparative advantage was the forerunner of the push towards globalization via increased international trade, the guiding theme in economic policy currently promoted by the OECD and the World Trade Organization
1875 Syngman Rhee a Korean statesman and the first president of the Provisional Government of the Republic of Korea as well as the first president of South Korea. His three-term presidency of South Korea was strongly affected by Cold War tensions on the Korean peninsula
1927 Tadeusz Mazowiecki a Polish author, journalist, philanthropist and Christian-democratic politician, formerly one of the leaders of the Solidarity movement, and the first non-communist Polish prime minister since 1946.
1941 Michael D. Higgins the ninth and current President of Ireland, in office since 11 November 2011.
1963 Conan O'Brien an American television host, comedian, writer, producer, and voice actor. He is best known for hosting several late-night talk shows, the most recent of which, Conan, premiered on American cable television station TBS in 2010. O'Brien was born in Brookline, Massachusetts, and was raised in an Irish Catholic family. He served as president of the Harvard Lampoon while attending Harvard University, and was a writer for the sketch comedy series Not Necessarily the News
1971 David Tennant a Scottish actor known for his roles as the tenth incarnation of the Doctor in the British television series Doctor Who, as Giacomo Casanova in the TV serial Casanova and as Barty Crouch, in the film Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. In addition to his appearances on screen, Tennant has worked as a voice actor and appeared in a critically acclaimed stage production of Hamlet
1973 Haile Gebrselassie an Ethiopian long-distance track and road running athlete. He won two Olympic gold medals over 10,000 metres and four World Championship titles in the event. He won the Berlin Marathon four times consecutively and also had three straight wins at the Dubai Marathon. Further to this, he won four world titles indoors and was the 2001 World Half Marathon Champion

Top 7 most famous people died on April 18

1873 Justus von Liebig a German chemist who made major contributions to agricultural and biological chemistry, and was considered the founder of organic chemistry. As a professor at the University of Giessen, he devised the modern laboratory-oriented teaching method, and for such innovations, he is regarded one of the greatest chemistry teachers of all time. He is considered the "father of the fertilizer industry" for his discovery of nitrogen as an essential plant nutrient, and his formulation of the Law of the Minimum which described the effect of individual nutrients on crops. He also developed a manufacturing process for beef extracts, and founded a company, Liebig Extract of Meat Company, that later trademarked the Oxo brand beef bouillon cube
1943 Isoroku Yamamoto a Japanese Marshal Admiral and the commander-in-chief of the Combined Fleet during World War II until his death.
1947 Jozef Tiso a Slovak Roman Catholic priest, and a leading politician of the Slovak People's Party. Between 1939 and 1945, Tiso was the head of the 1939–45 First Slovak Republic, a satellite state of Nazi Germany. After the end of World War II, Tiso was convicted and hanged for treason
1949 Leonard Bloomfield an American linguist who led the development of structural linguistics in the United States during the 1930s and the 1940s. His influential textbook Language, published in 1933, presented a comprehensive description of American structural linguistics. He made significant contributions to Indo-European historical linguistics, the description of Austronesian languages, and description of languages of the Algonquian family
1955 Albert Einstein a German-born theoretical physicist and philosopher of science. He developed the general theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. He is best known in popular culture for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2. He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect". The latter was pivotal in establishing quantum theory
1964 Ben Hecht an American screenwriter, director, producer, playwright, journalist and novelist. Called "the Shakespeare of Hollywood", he received screen credits, alone or in collaboration, for the stories or screenplays of some seventy films and as a prolific storyteller, authored thirty-five books and created some of the most entertaining screenplays and plays in America. Film historian Richard Corliss called him "the Hollywood screenwriter", someone who "personified Hollywood itself." The Dictionary of Literary Biography - American Screenwriters calls him "one of the most successful screenwriters in the history of motion pictures." Born in Brooklyn, his family moved to Wisconsin. At the age of 16, Hecht ran away to Chicago, where in his own words he "haunted streets, whorehouses, police stations, courtrooms, theater stages, jails, saloons, slums, madhouses, fires, murders, riots, banquet halls, and bookshops" and "tasted more than any fit belly could hold". In the 1910s and early 20s, Hecht became a noted journalist, foreign correspondent, and literary figure
2002 Thor Heyerdahl a Norwegian ethnographer and adventurer with a background in zoology, botany, and geography. He became notable for his Kon-Tiki expedition in 1947, in which he sailed 8,000 km across the Pacific Ocean in a hand-built raft from South America to the Tuamotu Islands. The expedition was designed to demonstrate that ancient people could have made long sea voyages, creating contacts between separate cultures. This was linked to a diffusionist model of cultural development. Heyerdahl subsequently made other voyages designed to demonstrate the possibility of contact between widely separated ancient people. He was appointed a government scholar in 1984