Died on April 7

924 Berengar I of Italy the King of Italy from 887, and Holy Roman Emperor after 915, until his death. He is usually known as Berengar of Friuli, since he ruled the March of Friuli from 874 until at least 890, but he had lost control of the region by 896
1206 Frederick I Duke of Lorraine the duke of Lorraine from 1205 to his death. He was the second son of Matthias I and Judith, daughter of Frederick II, Duke of Swabia. He succeeded his brother, Simon II, who had already given him the county of Bitche in 1176 and had recognised him over the northern, germanophone half of Lorraine by the Treaty of Ribemont of 1179. Judith had wanted him to succeed to all their father's inheritance, but a three-year civil war only secured him Bitche and a half-portion
1234 Sancho VII of Navarre the King of Navarre from 1194 to his death. His retirement at the end of his life has given rise to the alternate nickname el Encerrado or "the Retired."
1340 Bolesław Jerzy II of Mazovia a ruler of the Polish Piast dynasty who reigned in the originally Ruthenian principality of Galicia. After his death started the Galicia–Volhynia Wars over succession of Galicia and Volhynia
1434 Casimir I of Oświęcim a Duke of Oświęcim since 1406 , ruler over Toszek and Strzelin.
1445 Louis VIII Duke of Bavaria Duke of Bavaria-Ingolstadt from 1443 until his death. He was born in Paris, a son of Louis VII and his first wife Anne de Bourbon-La Marche, a daughter of John I, Count of La Marche. He died in 1445 at Ingolstadt
1498 Charles VIII of France a monarch of the House of Valois who ruled as King of France from 1483 to his death in 1498. He succeeded his father Louis XI at the age of 13. His elder sister Anne of France acted as regent jointly with her husband Peter II, Duke of Bourbon until 1491 when the young king turned 21 years of age. During Anne's regency, the great lords rebelled against royal centralisation efforts in a conflict known as the Mad War , which resulted in a victory for the royal government
1503 Sophia Palaiologina a niece of the last Byzantine emperor Constantine XI and second wife of Ivan III of Russia. She was also the grandmother of Ivan the Terrible
1614 El Greco a painter, sculptor and architect of the Spanish Renaissance. "El Greco" was a nickname, a reference to his ethnic Greek origin, and the artist normally signed his paintings with his full birth name in Greek letters, Δομήνικος Θεοτοκόπουλος , often adding the word Κρής
1638 Shimazu Tadatsune a tozama daimyo of Satsuma, the first to hold it as a formal fief under the Tokugawa shogunate, and the first Japanese to rule over the Ryūkyū Kingdom. As lord of Satsuma, he was among the most powerful lords in Japan at the time, and formally submitted to Tokugawa Ieyasu in 1602, to prove his loyalty, being rewarded as a result with the name Matsudaira Iehisa; Matsudaira being a branch family of the Tokugawa, and "Ie" of "Iehisa" being taken from "Ieyasu", this was a great honor. As of 1603, his holdings amounted to 605,000 koku
1651 Lennart Torstensson a Swedish Field Marshal and military engineer.
1658 Juan Eusebio Nieremberg a Spanish Jesuit and mystic.
1661 Sir William Brereton 1st Baronet an English writer and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1628 and 1659. He was a commander in the Parliamentary army in the English Civil War
1663 Francis Cooke He was a Leiden Separatist who came to America in 1620 on the Pilgrim ship Mayflower and a signer of the Mayflower Compact
1668 William Davenant an English poet and playwright. Along with Thomas Killigrew, Davenant was one of the rare figures in English Renaissance theatre whose career spanned both the Caroline and Restoration eras and who was active both before and after the English Civil War and during the Interregnum
1719 Jean-Baptiste de La Salle a French priest, educational reformer, and founder of the Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools. He is a saint of the Roman Catholic church and the patron saint of teachers
1739 Dick Turpin an English highwayman whose exploits were romanticised following his execution in York for horse theft. Turpin may have followed his father's profession as a butcher early in life, but, by the early 1730s, he had joined a gang of deer thieves and, later, became a poacher, burglar, horse thief and killer. He is also known for a fictional 200-mile overnight ride from London to York on his horse Black Bess, a story that was made famous by the Victorian novelist William Harrison Ainsworth almost 100 years after Turpin's death
1747 Leopold I Prince of Anhalt-Dessau a German prince of the House of Ascania and ruler of the principality of Anhalt-Dessau from 1693 to 1747. He was also a Generalfeldmarschall in the Prussian army. Nicknamed "the Old Dessauer" , he possessed good abilities as a field commander, but was mainly remembered a talented drillmaster who modernized the Prussian infantry
1758 Joachim Wilhelm von Brawe a German poet from Weißenfels.
1761 Thomas Bayes an English statistician, philosopher and Presbyterian minister, known for having formulated a specific case of the theorem that bears his name: Bayes' theorem. Bayes never published what would eventually become his most famous accomplishment; his notes were edited and published after his death by Richard Price
1766 Johann Albrecht Korff a Russian diplomat, and was the president of the Petersburg Academy of Sciences.
1766 Tiberius Hemsterhuis a Dutch philologist and critic.
1782 Taksin the only King of the Thonburi Kingdom and was of Thai Chinese heritage. He was a leader in the liberation of Siam from Burmese occupation after the Second Fall of Ayutthaya in 1767, and the subsequent unification of Siam after it fell under various warlords. He established the city Thonburi as the new capital, as the city Ayutthaya had been almost completely destroyed by the invaders. His reign was characterized by numerous wars, fought to repel new Burmese invasions and to subjugate the northern Thai kingdom of Lanna, the Laotian principalities, and a threatening Cambodia. He was executed and succeeded by his long-time friend King Buddha Yodfa Chulaloke who then created the Chakri dynasty and the Rattanakosin Kingdom
1783 Ignaz Holzbauer a composer of symphonies, concertos, operas, and chamber music, and a member of the Mannheim school. His aesthetic style is in line with that of the Sturm und Drang "movement" of German art and literature
1789 Abdul Hamid I the 27th Sultan of the Ottoman Empire. He was the son of sultan Ahmed III and succeeded his brother Mustafa III on 21 January 1774. He was born in Constantinople. His mother was Râbi'a Sharmi Sultana
1789 Petrus Camper a Dutch physician, anatomist, physiologist, midwife, zoologist, anthropologist, paleontologist and a naturalist. He studied the orangutan, the rhinoceros, and the skull of a mosasaur, which he believed was a whale. One of the first to interest himself in comparative anatomy and paleontology, he also invented the measure of the facial angle. Camper was not a dull professor in his library, becoming a celebrity in Europe and a member of the Royal Society. He was interested in architecture, mathematics, and made drawings for his lectures. He designed and made tools for his patients, always trying to be practical. Besides he was a sculptor, a patron of art and a conservative politician
1801 Noël François de Wailly a French grammarian and lexicographer.
1801 Jacobus Buys a Dutch painter and engraver.
1803 Toussaint Louverture the leader of the Haitian Revolution. His military genius and political acumen transformed an entire society of slaves into the independent state of Haiti. The success of the Haitian Revolution shook the institution of slavery throughout the New World
1805 Gabriel Gruber Very Rev. Gabriel Gruber, S.J. was the second Superior General of the Society of Jesus in Russia
1808 Peter Rainier junior a British naval officer. Mount Rainier in Washington, USA, was named after him
1811 Garsevan Chavchavadze a Georgian politician and diplomat primarily known as a Georgian ambassador to Imperial Russia.
1811 Dositej Obradović a Serbian author, philosopher, linguist, traveler, polyglot and the first minister of education of Serbia. An influential protagonist of the Serbian national and cultural renaissance, he advocated Enlightenment and rationalist ideas while remaining a Serbian patriot and an adherent of the Serbian Orthodox Church. Founder of modern Serbian literature, he is commonly referred to by his mononym, first name alone. He became a monk in the Serb Orthodox monastery of Hopovo, in the Srem region, and acquired the name Dositej. He translated many European classics, including Aesop's Fables, into Serbian
1816 Maria Ludovika of Austria-Este the daughter of Archduke Ferdinand of Austria-Este and his wife, Maria Beatrice Ricciarda d'Este. She was a member of the House of Austria-Este, a branch of the House of Habsburg-Lorraine
1816 Christian Konrad Sprengel a German theologist, teacher and, most importantly, a naturalist. He is most famously known for his research into plant sexuality
1820 Carl Olof Cronstedt a Swedish naval commander responsible for the overwhelming Swedish victory at the Second Battle of Svensksund, one of the largest naval battles in history. He is often better remembered, however, as the commander of the fortress of Sveaborg during the Finnish War in 1808–09, which was fought between Sweden and Imperial Russia, and ended in Cronstedt surrendering the fortress
1823 Jacques Charles a French inventor, scientist, mathematician, and balloonist. Charles wrote almost nothing about mathematics, and most of what has been credited to him was due to mistaking him with another Jacques Charles, also a member of the Paris Academy of Sciences, entering on May 12, 1785. He was sometimes called Charles the Geometer. Charles and the Robert brothers launched the world's first hydrogen-filled balloon in August 1783; then in December 1783, Charles and his co-pilot Nicolas-Louis Robert ascended to a height of about 1,800 feet in a manned balloon. Their pioneering use of hydrogen for lift led to this type of balloon being named a Charlière
1831 Henry Phipps 1st Earl of Mulgrave a British soldier and politician. He notably served as Foreign Secretary under William Pitt the Younger from 1805 to 1806
1833 Antoni Radziwiłł a Polish and Prussian noble, aristocrat, musician and politician. Initially a hereditary Duke of Nieśwież and Ołyka, as a scion of the Radziwiłł family he also held the honorific title of a Reichsfürst of the Holy Roman Empire. Between 1815 and 1831 he acted as Duke-Governor of the Grand Duchy of Posen, an autonomous province of the Kingdom of Prussia created out of Greater Polish lands annexed in the Partitions of Poland
1834 Jean Louis Marie Poiret a French clergyman, botanist and explorer.
1836 William Godwin an English journalist, political philosopher and novelist. He is considered one of the first exponents of utilitarianism, and the first modern proponent of anarchism. Godwin is most famous for two books that he published within the space of a year: An Enquiry Concerning Political Justice, an attack on political institutions, and Things as They Are; or, The Adventures of Caleb Williams, which attacks aristocratic privilege, but also is the first mystery novel. Based on the success of both, Godwin featured prominently in the radical circles of London in the 1790s. In the ensuing conservative reaction to British radicalism, Godwin was attacked, in part because of his marriage to the pioneering feminist writer Mary Wollstonecraft in 1797 and his candid biography of her after her death; their daughter, Mary Godwin would go on to write Frankenstein and marry the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. Godwin wrote prolifically in the genres of novels, history and demography throughout his lifetime. With his second wife, Mary Jane Clairmont, he wrote children's primers on Biblical and classical history, which he published along with such works as Charles and Mary Lamb's Tales from Shakespeare. Using the pseudonym Edward Baldwin, he wrote a variety of books for children, including a version of Jack and the Beanstalk. He also has had considerable influence on British literature and literary culture
1838 John Hayes (Royal Navy officer) a prominent British Royal Navy officer of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Hayes was best known for his skill at seamanship and his interest in the design and construction of naval vessels, beginning with his childhood education at Deptford Dockyard where his uncle Adam was a master shipbuilder. During his naval service he participated in the first and the last significant frigate actions of the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, from the inconclusive engagement between Embuscade and HMS Boston in 1793 and the capture of USS President in 1815. After the war's end, Hayes was appointed as superintendent of HMNB Devonport and later was commander in chief off West Africa
1844 Morgan Lewis (governor) an American lawyer, politician and military commander.
1845 Julie Clary Queen consort of Spain and the Indies, Naples and Sicily as the spouse of King Joseph Bonaparte, who was King of Naples and Sicily from January 1806 to June 1808, and later King of Spain and the Spanish West Indies from 25 June 1808 to June 1813.
1849 George Washington Whistler a prominent American railroad engineer in the first half of the 19th century.
1849 Pedro Ignacio de Castro Barros an Argentine statesman and priest. He was a representative to the Congress of Tucumán which on 9 July 1816 declared the Independence of Argentina
1850 William Lisle Bowles an English priest, poet and critic.
1851 Henry Thomas Alken an English painter and engraver chiefly known as a caricaturist and illustrator of sporting subjects and coaching scenes. His most prolific period of painting and drawing occurred between 1816 and 1831
1854 Pierre François Tissot a French man of letters and politician.
1857 Count Karl Ludwig von Ficquelmont an Austrian aristocrat, statesman and Field marshal of the Austrian Imperial army of French noble origin.