April 1936 in history

April 1936 events chronologically

Apr 1 Odisha formerly known as Kalinga or Utkal becomes a state in India
Apr 3 Bruno Richard Hauptmann is executed for the kidnapping and death of Charles Augustus Lindbergh, Jr., the baby son of pilot Charles Lindbergh
Apr 5 Tupelo-Gainesville tornado outbreak: An F5 tornado kills 233 in Tupelo, Mississippi
Apr 6 Tupelo-Gainesville tornado outbreak: Another tornado from the same storm system as the Tupelo tornado hits Gainesville, Georgia, killing 203
Apr 15 Aer Lingus (Aer Loingeas) is founded by the Irish government as the national airline of the Republic of Ireland
Apr 15 First day of the Arab revolt in Mandatory Palestine
Apr 18 The first Champions Day is celebrated in Detroit, Michigan

Top 7 most famous people born in April 1936

Apr 1 Abdul Qadeer Khan NI, HI, FPAS i/ˌɑːbˈdʊl kɑːdɪər kɑːn/ , also known by some in Pakistan as Mohsin-e-Pakistan , more popularly known as Q. Khan, is a Pakistani nuclear physicist and a metallurgical engineer, colloquially regarded as the founder of HEU based Gas-centrifuge uranium enrichment program for Pakistan's integrated atomic bomb project. He founded and established the Kahuta Research Laboratories in 1976, being both its senior scientist and the Director-General until his retirement in 2001, and he was an early and vital figure in other science projects. Apart from participating in Pakistan's atomic bomb project, he made major contributions in molecular morphology, physical martensite, and its integrated applications in condensed and material physics
Apr 9 Valerie Solanas best known for the SCUM Manifesto, as well as the attempted murder of artist Andy Warhol.
Apr 21 James Dobson an American evangelical Christian author, psychologist, and founder in 1977 of Focus on the Family , which he led until 2003. In the 1980s he was ranked as one of the most influential spokesmen for conservative social positions in American public life. Although never an ordained minister, he was called "the nation's most influential evangelical leader" by Time while Slate portrayed him as a successor to evangelical leaders Billy Graham, Jerry Falwell, and Pat Robertson
Apr 22 Glen Campbell an American country music singer, guitarist, television host, and occasional actor. He is best known for a series of hits in the 1960s and 1970s, and for hosting a variety show called The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour on CBS television
Apr 23 Roy Orbison an American singer-songwriter, best known for his trademark sunglasses, distinctive, powerful voice, complex compositions, and dark emotional ballads. Orbison grew up in Texas and began singing in a rockabilly/country and western band in high school until he was signed by Sun Records in Memphis. His greatest success came with Monument Records between 1960 and 1964, when 22 of his songs placed on the Billboard Top 40, including "Only the Lonely", "Crying", and "Oh, Pretty Woman". His career stagnated through the 1970s, but several covers of his songs and the use of "In Dreams" in David Lynch's film Blue Velvet revived his career
Apr 28 Tariq Aziz the Foreign Minister and Deputy Prime Minister of Iraq and a close advisor of former President Saddam Hussein. Their association began in the 1950s when both were activists for the then-banned Arab Socialist Ba'ath Party. Although he is an Arab Nationalist he is in fact an ethnic Assyrian, and a member of the Chaldean Catholic Church
Apr 29 Zubin Mehta an Indian Parsi conductor of Western classical music. He is the Music Director for Life of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra and the Main Conductor for Valencia's opera house. Zubin Mehta is also the chief conductor of Florence, Italy's Maggio Musicale festival

Top 7 most famous people died in April 1936

Apr 3 Richard Hauptmann a German criminal who was convicted for the abduction and murder of the 20-month-old son of Charles Lindbergh and Anne Morrow Lindbergh. The Lindbergh kidnapping became known as "The Crime of the Century"
Apr 8 Róbert Bárány an Austro-Hungarian otologist. He received the 1914 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work on the physiology and pathology of the vestibular apparatus
Apr 9 Ferdinand Tönnies a German sociologist and philosopher. He was a major contributor to sociological theory and field studies, best known for his distinction between two types of social groups, Gemeinschaft and Gesellschaft. He was also a prolific writer and co-founder of the German Society for Sociology, of which he was president from 1909 to 1933
Apr 18 Ottorino Respighi an Italian composer, musicologist and conductor. He is best known for his orchestral music, particularly the three Roman tone poems: Fountains of Rome , Pines of Rome , and Roman Festivals. His musicological interest in 16th-, 17th- and 18th-century music led him to compose pieces based on the music of these periods. He also wrote a number of operas, the most famous of which is La fiamma
Apr 27 Karl Pearson an influential English mathematician and biometrician. He has been credited with establishing the discipline of mathematical statistics, and contributed significantly to the field of biometrics, meteorology, theories of social Darwinism and eugenics. A major proponent of eugenics, Pearson was also a protégé and biographer of Sir Francis Galton
Apr 28 Fuad I of Egypt the Sultan and later King of Egypt and Sudan, Sovereign of Nubia, Kordofan, and Darfur. The ninth ruler of Egypt and Sudan from the Muhammad Ali dynasty, he became Sultan of Egypt and Sudan in 1917, succeeding his elder brother Sultan Hussein Kamel. He substituted the title of King for Sultan when the United Kingdom recognised Egyptian independence in 1922. His name is sometimes spelled Fouad
Apr 30 A. E. Housman Alfred Edward Housman , usually known as E. Housman, was an English classical scholar and poet, best known to the general public for his cycle of poems A Shropshire Lad. Lyrical and almost epigrammatic in form, the poems wistfully evoke the dooms and disappointments of youth in the English countryside. Their beauty, simplicity and distinctive imagery appealed strongly to late Victorian and Edwardian taste, and to many early 20th-century English composers both before and after the First World War. Through their song-settings, the poems became closely associated with that era, and with Shropshire itself