Born in April

April 28, 32 Otho Roman Emperor for three months, from 15 January to 16 April 69. He was the second emperor of the Year of the Four Emperors
April 23, 43 Gaius Vibius Pansa Caetronianus consul of the Roman Republic in 43 Although supporting Gaius Julius Caesar during the Civil War, he pushed for the restoration of the Republic upon Caesar’s death. He died of injuries sustained at the Battle of Forum Gallorum
April 15, 68 Gaius Maecenas an ally, friend and political advisor to Octavian as well as an important patron for the new generation of Augustan poets, including both Horace and Virgil. During the reign of Augustus, Maecenas served as a quasi-culture minister to the Emperor
April 9, 92 Yuan An regarded as the founder of the powerful Yuan clan of Ru'nan, one of the leading aristocratic families of the Eastern Han.
April 26, 121 Marcus Aurelius Roman Emperor from 161 to 180. He ruled with Lucius Verus as co-emperor from 161 until Verus' death in 169. He was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers
April 11, 145 Septimius Severus Roman emperor from 193 to 211. Severus was born in Leptis Magna in the Roman province of Africa. As a young man he advanced through the cursus honorum—the customary succession of offices—under the reigns of Marcus Aurelius and Commodus. Severus seized power after the death of Emperor Pertinax in 193 during the Year of the Five Emperors
April 4, 188 Caracalla the popular nickname of Antoninus , Roman emperor of Punic and Syrian descent from 198 to 217. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla is remembered as one of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Empire
April 29, 220 Pacuvius the greatest of the tragic poets of ancient Rome prior to Lucius Accius.
April 10, 401 Theodosius II Eastern Roman Emperor from 408 to 450. He is mostly known for promulgating the Theodosian law code, and for the construction of the Theodosian Walls of Constantinople. He also presided over the outbreak of two great christological controversies, Nestorianism and Eutychianism
April 9, 436 Tan Daoji a high level general of the Chinese dynasty Liu Song. He was one of the most respected generals during the Southern and Northern Dynasties era. Because of this, however, he was feared by Emperor Wen and even more so by Emperor Wen's brother, the prime minister Liu Yikang the Prince of Pengcheng, and during an illness of Emperor Wen, Liu Yikang had Tan arrested and executed on false accusations of treason
April 17, 617 Donnán of Eigg a Gaelic priest, likely from Ireland, who attempted to introduce Christianity to the Picts of northwestern Scotland during the Early Middle Ages. Donnán is the patron saint of Eigg, an island in the Inner Hebrides where he was martyred
April 19, 626 Eanflæd a Kentish princess, queen of Northumbria and later, the abbess of an influential Christian monastery in Whitby, England. She was the daughter of King Edwin of Northumbria and Æthelburg, who in turn was the daughter of King Æthelberht of Kent. In or shortly after 642 Eanflæd became the second wife of King Oswiu of Northumbria. After Oswiu's death in 670, she retired to Whitby Abbey, which had been founded by Hilda of Whitby. Eanflæd became the abbess around 680 and remained there until her death. The monastery had strong association with members of the Northumbrian royal family and played an important role in the establishment of Roman Christianity in England during that historical period
April 29, 643 Hou Junji a major general and chancellor of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty, particularly known for his campaigns against Gaochang and Tuyuhun. In 643, he was implicated in a plot by Emperor Taizong's crown prince Li Chengqian to overthrow Emperor Taizong, and he was executed
April 23, 702 Ja'far al-Sadiq a descendant of Ali from his father's side and a descendant of Fatimah from his mother's side and was himself a prominent Muslim jurist. He is revered as an imam by the adherents of Shi'a Islam and Alevism and as a renowned Islamic scholar and personality by Sunni Muslims. The Shi'a Muslims consider him to be the Sixth Imam or leader and spiritual successor to Muhammad. Sunni sources claim that doctrines such as the Imamate were formulated many years after al-Sadiq and wrongly ascribed to him. The internal dispute over who was to succeed Ja'far as imam led to schism within Shi'a Islam. Al-Sadiq was celebrated among his brothers and peers and stood out among them for his great personal merits. He is highly respected by both Sunni and Shi'a Muslims for his great Islamic scholarship, pious character, and academic contributions
April 12, 811 Muhammad al-Jawad the ninth of the Twelve Imams of Twelver Shi'ism. His given name was Muhammad ibn ‘Alī ibn Mūsā, and among his titles, al-Taqī and al-Jawād are the most renowned. Muhammad al-Taqī was the shortest-lived of the Twelve Imāms, dying at the age of 25
April 6, 861 Prudentius of Troyes bishop of Troyes, and a celebrated opponent of Hincmar of Reims in the controversy on predestination.
April 21, 866 Bardas a Byzantine noble and high-ranking minister. As the brother of Empress Theodora, he rose to high office under Theophilos. Although sidelined after Theophilos's death by Theodora and Theoktistos, in 855 he engineered Theoktistos's murder and became the de facto regent for his nephew, Michael III. Rising to the rank of Caesar, he was the effective ruler of the Byzantine Empire for ten years, a period which saw military success, renewed diplomatic and missionary activity, and an intellectual revival that heralded the Macedonian Renaissance. He was assassinated in 866 at the instigation of Michael III's new favourite, Basil the Macedonian, who a year later would usurp the throne for himself and install his own dynasty on the Byzantine throne
April 2, 872 Muflih al-Turki a Turkish military officer of the Abbasid Caliphate in the mid-9th century. He played a prominent role in the events known as the Anarchy at Samarra, but was killed in battle against the Zanj rebels of southern Iraq
April 16, 886 Joscelin (bishop of Paris) or Gauzlin , Bishop of Paris and defender of the city against the Northmen , was, according to some authorities, the son of Rorgon I, count of Maine, according to others the natural son of the emperor Louis I.
April 8, 894 Adalelm Count of Troyes the Count of Troyes from 886 to his death. He was a son of Emenon, Count of Poitou, and a Robertian
April 12, 901 Eudokia Baïana the third wife of Leo VI the Wise.
April 10, 943 Landulf I of Benevento a Lombard nobleman and the Prince of Benevento and of Capua from 12 January 901, when his father, Atenulf I, prince of Capua and conqueror of Benevento, associated his with him in power.
April 8, 956 Gilbert Duke of Burgundy count of Chalon, Autun, Troyes, Avallon and Dijon, and duke of Burgundy between 952 and 956. He ruled Burgundy jure uxoris, his wife Ermengarde being of the family of Richard the Justiciar. By her he had two daughters: Adelais and Liutgarde. Gilbert never managed to maintain the independence of the duchy in the struggles for power of 10th century France. In 955, he became a vassal of Hugh the Great, count of Paris and married his oldest daughter, Lieutgard, to Hugh's son Otto of Paris
April 16, 963 William I of Weimar the first known member of the house of the counts of Weimar.
April 18, 963 Stephen Lekapenos the second son of the Byzantine emperor Romanos I Lekapenos , and co-emperor from 924 to 945. Along with his younger brother Constantine he deposed Romanos I in December 944, only to be themselves overthrown and exiled by the legitimate emperor Constantine VII a few weeks later. Stephen lived out his life in exile on the island of Lesbos, where he died on Easter 963
April 11, 999 Bao Zheng a government officer during the reign of Emperor Renzong in ancient China's Song Dynasty. During his twenty five years in civil service, Bao consistently demonstrated extreme honesty and uprightness, with actions such as sentencing his own uncle, impeaching an uncle of Emperor Renzong's favourite concubine and punishing powerful families. His appointment from 1057 to 1058 as the prefect of Song's capital Kaifeng, where he initiated a number of changes to better hear the grievances of the people, made him a legendary figure
April 30, 1002 Eckard I Margrave of Meissen Margrave of Meissen from 985 until his death, the first margrave of the Ekkehardinger family that dominated Meissen until the extinction of the line in 1046.
April 3, 1009 Bernard I William of Gascony the Duke of Gascony from 996 or 997 to his death.
April 23, 1014 Máel Mórda mac Murchada King of Leinster.
April 3, 1016 Emperor Xingzong of Liao an emperor of the Liao Dynasty. He reigned from June 25, 1031 to August 28, 1055
April 10, 1018 Nizam al-Mulk a Persian scholar and vizier of the Seljuq Empire. He held near absolute power for 20 years after the assassination of Alp Arslan in 1072
April 11, 1026 Theodoric I Duke of Upper Lorraine the count of Bar and duke of Upper Lorraine from 978 to his death. He was the son and successor of Frederick I and Beatrice, daughter of Hugh the Great, count of Paris, and sister to the French king Hugh Capet
April 16, 1039 William III of Weimar count of Weimar from 1003 and of the Eichsfeld from 1022.
April 27, 1051 Fulk Bertrand of Provence the joint Count of Provence with his elder brother William IV from 1018 and with his younger brother Geoffrey I from at least 1032 if not earlier. After William's death, Fulk assumed the title of margrave, indicating headship of the dynasty. They were the sons of William II, count of Provence
April 10, 1055 Conrad II Duke of Bavaria the duke of Bavaria from 1054 to 1055. He was the second son of the Emperor Henry III and his second wife, Agnes of Poitou. He was briefly appointed duke of Bavaria, which had been held by his elder brother Henry. He died soon after and was replaced by Henry
April 24, 1086 Ramiro II of Aragon King of Aragon from 1134 until withdrawing from public life in 1137. He was the youngest son of Sancho Ramírez, King of Aragon and Navarre and Felicia of Roucy
April 18, 1115 Gertrude of Süpplingenburg a Margravine consort of Austria and Tuscany and a Duchess consort of Saxony and Bavaria. She was a member of the Süpplingenburg dynasty
April 12, 1116 Richeza of Poland Queen of Sweden queen of Sweden and princess of Minsk through her three marriages.
April 14, 1126 Averroes the Latinized form of Ibn Rushd , full name ʾAbū l-Walīd Muḥammad Ibn ʾAḥmad Ibn Rušd , was a mediæval Andalusian Muslim polymath. He wrote on logic, Aristotelian and Islamic philosophy, theology, the Maliki school of Islamic jurisprudence, psychology, political and Andalusian classical music theory, geography, mathematics, and the mediæval sciences of medicine, astronomy, physics, and celestial mechanics. Averroes was born in Córdoba, Al Andalus , and died at Marrakesh in present-day Morocco. His body was interred in his family tomb at Córdoba. The 13th-century philosophical movement based on Averroes's work is called Averroism
April 16, 1127 Felix of Valois a hermit and a co-founder of the Trinitarian Order.
April 21, 1132 Sancho VI of Navarre king of Navarre from 1150 until his death in 1194.
April 4, 1139 Euphemia of Kiev Queen Consort of Hungary. Euphemia was the daughter of Grand Prince Vladimir II of Kiev and his second wife whose name and ancestry are unknown. She was married to King Coloman of Hungary around 1112. However, her husband, who had been suffering from a serious disease, caught her in adultery and immediately sent her back to Kiev. Euphemia gave birth to her son, Boris , in her father's court, but the son was never recognised by King Coloman
April 30, 1139 Ranulf II Count of Alife the count of Alife and Caiazzo, and for a contested period, Duke of Apulia. He was a member of the Norman Drengot clan which ruled Aversa and Capua for most of the century between 1050 and 1150. As the third Ranulf in his family he is sometimes called Ranulf III. Ranulf's wife, Matilda, was the sister of Roger II of Sicily
April 23, 1141 Malcolm IV of Scotland the eldest son of Henry, Earl of Huntingdon and Northumbria and Ada de Warenne. The original Malcolm Canmore, a name now associated with his great-grandfather Malcolm III , he succeeded his grandfather David I, and shared David's Anglo-Norman tastes
April 7, 1144 Ulrich I Duke of Carinthia the Duke of Carinthia and Margrave of Verona from 1135 until his death. He was the eldest son of Duke Engelbert and Uta, daughter of Burggrave Ulrich of Passau, his namesake. His father abdicated in 1135 and Ulrich was appointed his successor by the Emperor Lothair II at an imperial diet being held in Bamberg
April 6, 1151 Rostislav Yuryevich the Prince of Novgorod and Pereyaslavl, oldest son of Yuri Dolgoruky, and brother of Andrei Bogolyubsky.
April 10, 1151 Igor Svyatoslavich a Rus’ prince. His baptismal name was Yury. Igor was prince of Putivl , of Novgorod-Seversk , and of Chernigov
April 17, 1154 Sancho VII of Navarre the King of Navarre from 1194 to his death. His retirement at the end of his life has given rise to the alternate nickname el Encerrado or "the Retired."
April 5, 1170 Isabella of Hainault Queen of France as the first wife of King Philip II.
April 11, 1184 William of Winchester Lord of Lüneburg the fifth and youngest son of Duke Henry the Lion and Matilda of England, Duchess of Saxony, the eldest daughter of Henry II of England.