Died in April

April 12, 45 Gnaeus Pompeius a Roman politician and general from the late Republic.
April 30, 65 Lucan a Roman poet, born in Corduba , in the Hispania Baetica. Despite his short life, he is regarded as one of the outstanding figures of the Imperial Latin period. His youth and speed of composition set him apart from other poets
April 16, 69 Otho Roman Emperor for three months, from 15 January to 16 April 69. He was the second emperor of the Year of the Four Emperors
April 20, 168 Pope Anicetus the Bishop of Rome from 157 to his death in 168. According to the Annuario Pontificio, the start of his papacy may have been 153. His name is Greek for unconquered. According to the Liber Pontificalis, Anicetus was a Syrian from the city of Emesa
April 8, 217 Caracalla the popular nickname of Antoninus , Roman emperor of Punic and Syrian descent from 198 to 217. The eldest son of Septimius Severus, he reigned jointly with his father from 198 until Severus' death in 211. For a short time he then ruled jointly with his younger brother Geta until he had him murdered later in 211. Caracalla is remembered as one of the most notorious and unpleasant of emperors because of the massacres and persecutions he authorized and instigated throughout the Empire
April 12, 238 Gordian I Roman Emperor for one month with his son Gordian II in 238, the Year of the Six Emperors. Caught up in a rebellion against the Emperor Maximinus Thrax, he was defeated by forces loyal to Maximinus before committing suicide
April 12, 238 Gordian II Roman Emperor for one month with his father Gordian I in 238, the Year of the Six Emperors. Seeking to overthrow the Emperor Maximinus Thrax, he died in battle outside of Carthage
April 22, 296 Pope Caius the Bishop of Rome from 17 December 283 to his death in 296. Christian tradition makes him a native of the Dalmatian city of Salona, today Solin near Split, the son of a man also named Caius, and a member of a noble family related to the Emperor Diocletian. He was Illyrian
April 21, 303 Alexandra of Rome Christian saint, known from "Martyrdom of Saint George" as Emperor Diocletian's wife. She is also sometimes called Priscilla or Prisca
April 23, 303 Saint George a soldier in the Roman army and was later venerated as a Christian martyr. His father was Gerontius, a Greek Christian from Cappadocia, and an official in the Roman army. His mother, Polychronia was a Christian from Roman Palestine. Saint George became an officer in the Roman army in the Guard of Diocletian. In hagiography, Saint George is one of the most venerated saints in the Catholic , Anglican, Eastern Orthodox, and the Oriental Orthodox churches. He is immortalized in the tale of Saint George and the Dragon and is one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers. His memorial is celebrated on 23 April , and he is regarded as one of the most prominent military saints
April 1, 304 Pope Marcellinus the Bishop of Rome or Pope from 30 June 296 to his death in 304. According to the Liberian Catalogue, he was a Roman, the son of a certain Projectus. His predecessor was Pope Caius
April 17, 326 Pope Alexander of Alexandria 19th Pope of Alexandria & Patriarch of the See of Mark. During his patriarchate, he dealt with a number of issues facing the Church in that day. These included the dating of Easter, the actions of Meletius of Lycopolis, and the issue of greatest substance, Arianism. He was the leader of the opposition to Arianism at the First Council of Nicaea. He also is remembered for being the mentor of the man who would be his successor, Athanasius of Alexandria, who would become one of the leading Church fathers
April 12, 352 Pope Julius I the bishop of Rome from 6 February 337 to his death in 352.
April 12, 371 Zeno of Verona either an early Christian Bishop of Verona or a martyr. He is a saint in the Roman Catholic Church and in the Eastern Orthodox Church
April 10, 376 Bademus a rich, noble citizen of Bethlapeta in Persia, who founded a monastery nearby. He and some of his disciples were arrested and Bademus was martyred in the year 376; he was subsequently recognized as a saint
April 4, 397 Ambrose a bishop of Milan who became one of the most influential ecclesiastical figures of the 4th century. He was consular prefect of Liguria and Emilia, headquartered in Milan, before being made bishop of Milan by popular acclamation in 374. Ambrose was a staunch opponent of Arianism, and has been accused of fostering persecutions both of Arians and of Jews and pagans
April 29, 409 Severus of Naples a bishop of Naples during the 4th and 5th centuries. He is considered the twelfth bishop of Naples, succeeding Maximus. His episcopate ran from February 363 to April 29, 409, the traditional date of his death. Maximus is actually considered the 10th bishop by the Catholic Church; between the episcopates of Maximus and Severus was the episcopate of Zosimus, who was Arian and thus considered heretical by the Catholic Church
April 17, 485 Proclus a Greek Neoplatonist philosopher, one of the last major Classical philosophers. He set forth one of the most elaborate and fully developed systems of Neoplatonism. He stands near the end of the classical development of philosophy, and was very influential on Western medieval philosophy as well as Islamic thought
April 9, 491 Zeno (emperor) Byzantine Emperor from 474 to 475 and again from 476 to 491. Domestic revolts and religious dissension plagued his reign, which nevertheless succeeded to some extent in foreign issues. His reign saw the end of the Western Roman Empire under Julius Nepos, but he contributed much to stabilizing the eastern Empire
April 26, 499 Emperor Xiaowen of Northern Wei an emperor of the Northern Wei from September 20, 471 to April 26, 499.
April 25, 501 Saint Rusticus (Archbishop of Lyon) the Archbishop of Lyon, since the year 494, the successor of Saint Lupicinus of Lyon. Later canonized, his feast day is 25 April. He was the son of Aquilinus , nobleman at Lyon; and a schoolfellow and friend of Sidonius Apollinaris, who was a vicarius of a province in Gaul under the father of Sidonius between 423 and 448, and his wife Tullia , and the great-grandson of Decimus Rusticus and his wife Artemia, and also of Saint Eucherius and his wife Gallia. He was also the brother of Viventiolus
April 29, 505 Pope John I (II) of Alexandria 29th Pope of Alexandria & Patriarch of the See of Mark.
April 22, 536 Pope Agapetus I Pope from 13 May 535 to his death in 536. He is not to be confused with another Saint Agapetus, an Early Christian martyr with the feast day of 6 August
April 2, 573 Nicetius of Lyon Archbishop of Lyon, then Lugdunum, France, during the 6th century. He served from 552 or 553. He was ordained as a priest by Agricola, Bishop of Châlons-sur-Marne. He was the nephew of Saint Sacerdos, bishop of Lyon, and his successor. He revived ecclesiastical chant in his diocese
April 5, 582 Eutychius of Constantinople the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople from 552 to 565, and from 577 to 582. His feast is kept by the Orthodox Church on 6 April, and he is mentioned in the Catholic Church's "Corpus Juris". His terms of office, occurring during the reign of Emperor Justinian the Great, were marked by controversies with both imperial and papal authority
April 9, 585 Emperor Jimmu the first emperor of Japan, according to legend. His accession is traditionally dated as 660 He is a descendant of the sun goddess Amaterasu through her grandson Ninigi, as well as a descendant of the storm god Susanoo. He launched a military expedition from Hyuga near the Inland Sea, captured Yamato, and established this as his center of power
April 13, 585 Hermenegild the son of king Leovigild of Visigothic Spain. He fell out with his father in 579, then revolted the following year. During his rebellion, he converted from Arian Christianity to Chalcedonian Christianity. Hermenegild was defeated in 584, and exiled. His death was later celebrated as a martyrdom due to the influence of Pope Gregory the Great's Dialogues, in which he portrayed Hermenegild as a "Catholic martyr rebelling against the tyranny of an Arian father."
April 22, 591 Peter III of Raqqa the Patriarch of Antioch and head of the Syriac Orthodox Church from 581 until his death in 591.
April 11, 618 Emperor Yang of Sui the second son of Emperor Wen of Sui, and the second emperor of China's Sui dynasty.
April 8, 622 Prince Shōtoku a semi-legendary regent and a politician of the Asuka period in Japan who served under Empress Suiko. He was a son of Emperor Yōmei and his younger half-sister Princess Anahobe no Hashihito. His parents were relatives of the ruling Soga clan, and was involved in the defeat of the rival Mononobe Clan. The primary source of the life and accomplishments of Prince Shōtoku comes from the Nihon Shoki
April 24, 624 Mellitus the first Bishop of London in the Saxon period, the third Archbishop of Canterbury, and a member of the Gregorian mission sent to England to convert the Anglo-Saxons from their native paganism to Christianity. He arrived in 601 AD with a group of clergymen sent to augment the mission, and was consecrated as Bishop of London in 604. Mellitus was the recipient of a famous letter from Pope Gregory I known as the Epistola ad Mellitum, preserved in a later work by the medieval chronicler Bede, which suggested the conversion of the Anglo-Saxons be undertaken gradually, integrating pagan rituals and customs. In 610, Mellitus returned to Italy to attend a council of bishops, and returned to England bearing papal letters to some of the missionaries
April 15, 628 Empress Suiko the 33rd monarch of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.
April 27, 629 Ardashir III king of the Sasanian Empire from 6 September 628 to 27 April 629.
April 4, 636 Isidore of Seville considered, as the 19th-century historian Montalembert put it in an oft-quoted phrase, "The last scholar of the ancient world".
April 26, 645 Richarius a Frankish hermit, monk, and the founder of two monasteries. He is venerated as a saint in the Roman Catholic Church
April 17, 656 Peada of Mercia briefly King of southern Mercia after his father's death in November 655 until his own death in the spring of the next year.
April 16, 665 Fructuosus of Braga the Bishop of Dumio and Archbishop of Braga, a great founder of monasteries, who died on 16 April 665. He was the son of a Visigothic dux in the region of Bierzo and he accompanied his father at a young age on certain official trips over his estates. Fructuosus was a disciple of Bishop Conantius of Palencia
April 11, 678 Pope Donus Pope from 2 November 676 to his death in 678. He was the son of a Roman named Mauricius. Not much is known of this pope
April 9, 682 Maslama ibn Mukhallad al-Ansari one of the Companions of the Prophet and active in Egypt in the decades after its conquest by the Muslims.
April 20, 689 Cædwalla of Wessex the King of Wessex from approximately 685 until he abdicated in 688. His name is derived from the British Cadwallon. He was exiled from Wessex as a youth and during his exile gathered forces and attacked the South Saxons, killing their king, Æthelwealh, in what is now Sussex. Cædwalla was unable to hold the South Saxon territory, however, and was driven out by Æthelwealh's ealdormen. In either 685 or 686 he became King of Wessex. He may have been involved in suppressing rival dynasties at this time, as an early source records that Wessex was ruled by underkings until Cædwalla
April 23, 711 Childebert III seemingly but a puppet of the mayor of the palace, Pepin of Heristal, though his placita show him making judicial decisions of his own will, even against the Arnulfing clan. His nickname has no comprehensible justification except possibly as a result of these judgements, but the Liber Historiae Francorum calls him a "famous man" and "the glorious lord of good memory, Childebert, the just king." He had a son named Dagobert, who succeeded him, as Dagobert III but his wife was not Edonne, the invention of later fantasists. It is possible, though not likely, that Chlothar IV was also his son. He spent almost his entire life in a royal villa on the Oise
April 9, 715 Pope Constantine Pope from 25 March 708 to his death in 715. With the exception of Antipope Constantine, he was the only pope to take such a "quintessentially" Eastern name of an emperor. During this period, the regnal name was also used by emperors and patriarchs
April 23, 725 Wihtred of Kent king of Kent from about 690 or 691 until his death. He was a son of Ecgberht I and a brother of Eadric. Wihtred acceded to the throne after a confused period in the 680s, which included a brief conquest of Kent by Cædwalla of Wessex and subsequent dynastic conflicts. His immediate predecessor was Oswine of Kent, who was probably descended from Eadbald of Kent, though not through the same line as Wihtred. Shortly after the start of his reign, Wihtred issued a code of laws—the Law of Wihtred—that has been preserved in a manuscript known as the Textus Roffensis. The laws pay a great deal of attention to the rights of the Church, including punishment for irregular marriages and for pagan worship. Wihtred's long reign had few incidents recorded in the annals of the day. He was succeeded in 725 by his sons, Æthelberht II, Eadberht I, and Ælfric
April 17, 744 Al-Walid II an Umayyad caliph who ruled from 743 until 744. He succeeded his uncle, Hisham ibn Abd al-Malik
April 26, 757 Pope Stephen II Pope from 26 March 752 to his death in 757. He succeeded Pope Zachary following the death of Pope-elect Stephen. Stephen II marks the historical delineation between the Byzantine Papacy and the Frankish Papacy
April 20, 767 Taichō a shugendō monk in Nara period Japan. He was raised in Echizen Province, which was in the southern portion of present day Fukui Prefecture. He was the second son of Mikami Yasuzumi. He is said to be the first person to reach the top of Mount Haku in neighboring Kaga Province and other peaks in the Ryōhaku Mountains
April 30, 783 Hildegard of the Vinzgau daughter of the Germanic Count Gerold of Vinzgau and Emma of Alemannia. She was the second wife of Charlemagne, who married her around 771. They had the following children:
April 18, 796 Æthelred I of Northumbria the king of Northumbria from 774 to 779 and again from 790 until he was murdered in 796. He was the son of Æthelwald Moll and Æthelthryth and possibly became king while still a child after Alhred was deposed
April 4, 814 Plato of Sakkoudion a Byzantine minor official who became a monk in 759. After refusing the metropolitan see of Nicomedia or the headship of a monastery in Constantinople, in 783 he founded the monastery of Sakkoudion on Mount Olympus in Bithynia, of which he became the first abbot. He is notable, along with his nephew Theodore Stoudites, for his iconodule stance during the Byzantine Iconoclasm and his participation in the Second Council of Nicaea, and to his firm opposition to the second marriage of Emperor Constantine VI to his niece Theodote. He was canonized by the Church, and his feast day is 18 April
April 13, 814 Krum khan of Bulgaria during the First Bulgarian Empire from sometime after 796 but before 803 until his death in 814. During his reign the Bulgarian territory doubled in size, spreading from the middle Danube to the Dnieper and from Odrin to the Tatra Mountains. According to the Encyclopaedia Britannica his able and energetic rule brought law and order to Bulgaria and developed the rudiments of state organisation