Died on 12th day

August 12, 30 Cleopatra the last active pharaoh of Ancient Egypt, only shortly survived by her son, Caesarion as pharaoh.
April 12, 45 Gnaeus Pompeius a Roman politician and general from the late Republic.
April 12, 238 Gordian I Roman Emperor for one month with his son Gordian II in 238, the Year of the Six Emperors. Caught up in a rebellion against the Emperor Maximinus Thrax, he was defeated by forces loyal to Maximinus before committing suicide
April 12, 238 Gordian II Roman Emperor for one month with his father Gordian I in 238, the Year of the Six Emperors. Seeking to overthrow the Emperor Maximinus Thrax, he died in battle outside of Carthage
March 12, 295 Maximilian (martyr) a Christian saint whose feast day is observed on 12 March. He is a martyr of the Christian Church from the third century AD, born in AD 274. Because his father Fabius Victor was a soldier in the Roman army, Maximilian was obliged to join at the age of 21. Brought before the proconsul of Numidia Cassius Dion, he refused, stating that, as a Christian, he could not serve in the military. This led to his martyrdom by beheading on 12 March, AD 295, at the City of Thavaste , North Africa. He is noted as an early conscientious objector; the 1970s anti-Vietnam War clergy group Order of Maximilian took their name from him
April 12, 352 Pope Julius I the bishop of Rome from 6 February 337 to his death in 352.
April 12, 371 Zeno of Verona either an early Christian Bishop of Verona or a martyr. He is a saint in the Roman Catholic Church and in the Eastern Orthodox Church
March 12, 417 Pope Innocent I Pope from 401 to his death in 417.
July 12, 524 Viventiolus the Archbishop of Lyon , from the year of 514. Later canonized, his Feast Day is July 12
September 12, 551 Sacerdos of Lyon a French saint whose Feast Day is September 12. He was Archbishop of Lyon, France from 544 to September 12, 551. He was the son of Rusticus, Archbishop of Lyon, and wife
March 12, 604 Pope Gregory I Pope from 3 September 590 to his death in 604. Gregory is well known for his writings, which were more prolific than those of any of his predecessors as pope. He is also known as Gregory the Dialogist in Eastern Christianity because of his Dialogues. For this reason, English translations of Eastern texts will sometimes list him as "Gregory Dialogus"
November 12, 607 Pope Boniface III the Pope from 19 February to his death in 607. Despite his short time as Pope he made a significant contribution to the organization of the Catholic Church
October 12, 633 Edwin of Northumbria the King of Deira and Bernicia – which later became known as Northumbria – from about 616 until his death. He converted to Christianity and was baptised in 627; after he fell at the Battle of Hatfield Chase, he was venerated as a saint
October 12, 638 Pope Honorius I reigned from 27 October 625 to his death in 638.
September 12, 640 Sak K'uk' now eastern Mexico.
October 12, 642 Pope John IV reigned from 24 December 640 to his death in 642. His election followed a four-month sede vacante
January 12, 690 Benedict Biscop an Anglo-Saxon abbot and founder of Monkwearmouth-Jarrow Priory and was considered a saint after his death.
July 12, 783 Bertrada of Laon a Frankish queen. She was the wife of Pepin the Short and the mother of Charlemagne, Carloman and Gisela
August 12, 792 Jænberht a medieval monk, and later the abbot, of St Augustine's Abbey, Canterbury who was named Archbishop of Canterbury in 765. As archbishop, he had a difficult relationship with King Offa of Mercia, who at one point confiscated lands from the archbishopric. By 787, some of the bishoprics under Canterbury's supervision were transferred to the control of the newly created Archbishopric of Lichfield, although it is not clear if Jænberht ever recognised its legitimacy. Besides the issue with Lichfield, Jænberht also presided over church councils in England. He died in 792 and was considered a saint after his death
May 12, 805 Æthelhard a Bishop of Winchester then an Archbishop of Canterbury in medieval England. Appointed by King Offa of Mercia, Æthelhard had difficulties with both the Kentish monarchs and with a rival archiepiscopate in southern England, and was deposed around 796 by King Eadberht III Præn of Kent. By 803, Æthelhard, along with the Mercian King Coenwulf, had secured the demotion of the rival archbishopric, once more making Canterbury the only archbishopric south of the Humber in Britain. Æthelhard died in 805, and was considered a saint until his cult was suppressed after the Norman Conquest in 1066
June 12, 816 Pope Leo III Pope from 795 to his death in 816. Protected by Charlemagne from his enemies in Rome, he subsequently strengthened Charlemagne's position by crowning him Roman Emperor and Augustus of the Romans
March 12, 817 Theophanes the Confessor a member of the Byzantine aristocracy, who became a monk and chronicler. He is venerated on March 12 in the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Roman Catholic Church
February 12, 821 Benedict of Aniane a Benedictine monk and monastic reformer, who left a large imprint on the religious practice of the Carolingian Empire. His feast day is February 12
March 12, 864 Liudolf Duke of Saxony a Saxon count, son of Count Brun and his wife, Gisla von Verla; later authors called him Duke of the Eastern Saxons and Count of Eastphalia. Liudolf had extended possessions in eastern Saxony, and was a leader in the wars of King Louis the German against Normans and Slavs. The ruling Liudolfing House, also known as the Ottonian dynasty, is named after him; he is its oldest verified member
August 12, 875 Louis II of Italy the King of Italy and Roman Emperor from 844, co-ruling with his father Lothair I until 855, after which he ruled alone. Louis's usual title was imperator augustus , but he used imperator Romanorum after his conquest of Bari in 871, which led to poor relations with Byzantium. He was called imperator Italiae in West Francia while the Byzantines called him Basileus Phrangias. The chronicler Andreas Bergomatis, who is the main source for Louis's activities in southern Italy, notes that "after his death a great tribulation came to Italy."
December 12, 884 Carloman II the youngest son of King Louis the Stammerer and Ansgarde of Burgundy, and became king, jointly with his brother Louis III of France, on his father's death in 879.
December 12, 894 Guy III of Spoleto the Margrave of Camerino from 880 and then Duke of Spoleto and Camerino from 883. He was crowned King of Italy in 889 and Holy Roman Emperor in 891. He died in 894 while fighting for control of the Italian peninsula
June 12, 918 Æthelflæd Lady of the Mercians, ruled Mercia from 911 to her death in 918. She was the eldest daughter of Alfred the Great, king of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Wessex, and his queen, Ealhswith. Æthelflæd was born at the height of the Viking invasions of England. Her father married her to Æthelred, Lord of the Mercians. After his death in 911, she ruled; the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle referred to her as the Myrcna hlæfdige, "Lady of the Mercians"
February 12, 941 Wulfhelm Bishop of Wells before being promoted to the Archbishopric of Canterbury about 926. Nothing is known about his time at Wells, but as archbishop he helped codify royal law codes and gave lands to monasteries. He went to Rome soon after his selection as archbishop. Two religious books that he gave to his cathedral are still extant
January 12, 951 Al-Farabi a renowned scientist and philosopher of the Islamic Golden Age. He was also a cosmologist, logician, and musician, representing the multidisciplinary approach of muslim scientists
November 12, 973 Burchard III Duke of Swabia the count of Thurgau and Zürichgau, perhaps of Rhaetia, and then Duke of Swabia from 954 to his death.
March 12, 996 Odo I Count of Blois the son of Theobald I of Blois and Luitgard, daughter of Herbert II of Vermandois. He received the title of count palatine, which was traditional in his family, from King Lothair of West Francia
May 12, 1003 Pope Sylvester II Pope from 2 April 999 to his death in 1003. Born Gerbert d'Aurillac , he was a prolific scholar and teacher. He endorsed and promoted study of Arab/Greco-Roman arithmetic, mathematics, and astronomy, reintroducing to Europe the abacus and armillary sphere, which had been lost to Europe since the end of the Greco-Roman era. He is said to be the first to introduce in Europe the decimal numeral system using the Arabic numerals after his studies at the University of al-Karaouine in Morocco. He was the first French Pope
May 12, 1012 Pope Sergius IV Pope and the ruler of the Papal States from 31 July 1009 to his death in 1012.
September 12, 1015 Lambert I Count of Louvain the first Count of Louvain in 1003. He was killed by Godfrey II, Duke of Lower Lorraine in battle for Godfrey's claim of Count of Verdun
June 12, 1020 Lyfing (Archbishop of Canterbury) an Anglo-Saxon Bishop of Wells and Archbishop of Canterbury.
March 12, 1022 Symeon the New Theologian a Byzantine Christian monk and poet who was the last of three saints canonized by the Eastern Orthodox church and given the title of "Theologian". "Theologian" was not applied to Symeon in the modern academic sense of theological study, but to recognize someone who spoke from personal experience of the vision of God. One of his principal teachings was that humans could and should experience theoria
January 12, 1027 Theodoric I Duke of Upper Lorraine the count of Bar and duke of Upper Lorraine from 978 to his death. He was the son and successor of Frederick I and Beatrice, daughter of Hugh the Great, count of Paris, and sister to the French king Hugh Capet
November 12, 1035 Cnut the Great a king of Denmark, England, Norway, and parts of Sweden, together often referred to as the Anglo-Scandinavian or North Sea Empire. After his death, the deaths of his heirs within a decade, and the Norman conquest of England in 1066, his legacy was largely lost to history. Historian Norman Cantor has made the statement that he was "the most effective king in Anglo-Saxon history", despite not being Anglo-Saxon
June 12, 1036 Tedald (bishop of Arezzo) the forty-third Bishop of Arezzo from 1023 until his death.
January 12, 1049 Abū-Sa'īd Abul-Khayr a famous Persian Sufi and poet who contributed extensively to the evolution of Sufi tradition.
July 12, 1067 John Komnenos (Domestic of the Schools) a Byzantine aristocrat and military leader. The younger brother of Emperor Isaac I Komnenos, he served as Domestic of the Schools during his brief reign. When Isaac I abdicated, Constantine X Doukas became emperor and John withdrew from public life until his death in 1067. Through his son Alexios I Komnenos, who became emperor in 1081, he was the progenitor of the Komnenian dynasty that ruled the Byzantine Empire from 1081 until 1185, and the Empire of Trebizond from 1204 until 1461
July 12, 1073 John Gualbert an Italian Roman Catholic saint, the founder of the Vallumbrosan Order.
November 12, 1087 William I Count of Burgundy Count of Burgundy from 1057 to 1087 and Mâcon from 1078 to 1087. He was a son of Renaud I and Alice of Normandy, daughter of Richard II, Duke of Normandy. William was the father of several notable children, including Pope Callixtus II
May 12, 1090 Liutold of Eppenstein Duke of Carinthia and Margrave of Verona from 1077 to 1090, succeeding Duke Berthold II of Zähringen.
November 12, 1094 Duncan II of Scotland king of Scots. He was son of Malcolm III and his first wife Ingibiorg Finnsdottir, widow of Thorfinn Sigurdsson
October 12, 1095 Leopold II Margrave of Austria the Margrave of Austria from 1075 to his death in 1095. He was a member of the House of Babenberg
February 12, 1101 Emperor Daozong of Liao now northeastern China. Succeeding his father, Xingzong, in 1055, Daozong ruled until he was murdered in 1101. He was succeeded by his grandson, Tianzuodi. He reigned from August 28, 1055 to February 12, 1101
December 12, 1101 Al-Musta'li the ninth Fatimid Caliph, and believed by the Mustaali Ismaili sect to be the 19th imam. Al-Musta‘li was made caliph by the vizier Malik al-Afdal Shahanshah as the successor to al-Mustansir. By and large, al-Musta‘li was subordinate to Malik al-Afdal. One complication with the selection of al-Musta‘li was that his older brother Nizar was considered by Nizar's supporters to be the rightful heir to the throne. This led to a power struggle within the Fatimids, and although Nizar's revolt was unsuccessful , the break from the rules of succession caused a schism amongst the Ismaili Shia. In Seljuk Syria and Persia, the Nizari sect developed, one branch of which is known to history as the Hashshashin. Supporters of Musta'li's imamate became known as the Mustaali sect
April 12, 1111 Berthold II Duke of Swabia the Duke of Swabia from 1092 to 1098.