Died on 17th day

October 17, 33 Agrippina the Elder a distinguished and prominent Roman woman of the first century Agrippina was the wife of the general and statesman Germanicus and a relative to the first Roman Emperors.
March 17, 45 Titus Labienus a professional Roman soldier in the late Roman Republic. He served as Tribune of the Plebs in 63 BC, and is remembered as one of Julius Caesar's lieutenants, mentioned frequently in the accounts of his military campaigns. He was the father of Quintus Labienus
March 17, 180 Marcus Aurelius Roman Emperor from 161 to 180. He ruled with Lucius Verus as co-emperor from 161 until Verus' death in 169. He was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers
May 17, 290 Emperor Wu of Jin the grandson of Sima Yi and son of Sima Zhao. He became the first emperor of the Jin dynasty after forcing Cao Huan, last ruler of the state of Cao Wei, to abdicate to him. He reigned from 265 to 290, and after conquering the state of Eastern Wu in 280, was the emperor of a unified China. Emperor Wu was known for his extravagance and sensuality, especially after the unification of China; legends boasted of his incredible potency among ten thousand concubines
February 17, 306 Theodore of Amasea one of the two saints called Theodore, who are venerated as Warrior Saints and Great Martyrs in the Eastern Orthodox Church. He is also known as Theodore Tyron. The other saint of the same name is Theodore Stratelates, also known as Theodore of Heraclea, but this second St Theodore may never have had a separate existence. When the epithet is omitted, the reference is usually to St Theodore of Amasea
April 17, 326 Pope Alexander of Alexandria 19th Pope of Alexandria & Patriarch of the See of Mark. During his patriarchate, he dealt with a number of issues facing the Church in that day. These included the dating of Easter, the actions of Meletius of Lycopolis, and the issue of greatest substance, Arianism. He was the leader of the opposition to Arianism at the First Council of Nicaea. He also is remembered for being the mentor of the man who would be his successor, Athanasius of Alexandria, who would become one of the leading Church fathers
November 17, 344 Emperor Kang of Jin an emperor of the Eastern Jin Dynasty. He was a son of Emperor Ming and younger brother of Emperor Cheng. His reign was brief—only two years
February 17, 364 Jovian (emperor) Roman Emperor from 363 to 364. Upon the death of emperor Julian the Apostate during his campaign against the Sassanid Empire, Jovian was hastily declared emperor by his soldiers. He sought peace with the Persians on humiliating terms and reestablished Christianity as the state church. His reign only lasted eight months
November 17, 375 Valentinian I Roman emperor from 364 to 375. Upon becoming emperor he made his brother Valens his co-emperor, giving him rule of the eastern provinces while Valentinian retained the west
January 17, 395 Theodosius I Roman Emperor from 379 to 395. Theodosius was the last emperor to rule over both the eastern and the western halves of the Roman Empire. On accepting his elevation, he campaigned against Goths and other barbarians who had invaded the Empire; he failed to kill, expel, or entirely subjugate them, and after the Gothic War they established a homeland south of the Danube, in Illyricum, within the empire's borders. He fought two destructive civil wars, in which he defeated the usurpers Magnus Maximus and Eugenius at great cost to the power of the Empire
February 17, 440 Mesrop Mashtots an Armenian theologian, linguist and hymnologist. He is best known for having invented the Armenian alphabet 405 AD, which was a fundamental step in strengthening the Armenian statehood and the bond between the Armenian Kingdom and Armenians living in the Byzantine Empire and the Persian Empire. He was also, according to a number of scholars and contemporaneous Armenian sources, the creator of the Caucasian Albanian and Georgian alphabets
October 17, 456 Avitus Western Roman Emperor from 8 or 9 July 455 to 17 October 456. He was a senator and a high-ranking officer both in the civil and military administration, as well as Bishop of Piacenza
November 17, 474 Leo II (emperor) Byzantine Emperor for less than a year in 474. He was the son of Zeno and Ariadne, and maternal grandson of Leo I and Verina. As Leo's closest male relative, he was named successor upon his grandfather's death. After taking his father as colleague, he died of an unknown disease about 10 months into his reign in November, 474. It was widely rumored that he might have been poisoned by his mother Ariadne in order to bring her husband Zeno to the throne. He was indeed succeeded by his father, although his grandmother Verina took advantage of his death to conspire against Zeno
April 17, 485 Proclus a Greek Neoplatonist philosopher, one of the last major Classical philosophers. He set forth one of the most elaborate and fully developed systems of Neoplatonism. He stands near the end of the classical development of philosophy, and was very influential on Western medieval philosophy as well as Islamic thought
July 17, 521 Magnus Felix Ennodius Bishop of Pavia in 514, and a Latin rhetorician and poet.
October 17, 532 Pope Boniface II reigned from 17 September 530 to his death in 532.
November 17, 593 Gregory of Tours a Gallo-Roman historian and Bishop of Tours, which made him a leading prelate of Gaul. He was born Georgius Florentius, later adding the name Gregorius in honour of his maternal great-grandfather. He wrote in a form of late Vulgar Latin; however, it has been argued that this was a deliberate ploy to ensure his works would reach a wide audience. He is the main contemporary source for Merovingian history. His most notable work was his Decem Libri Historiarum or Ten Books of Histories, better known as the Historia Francorum , a title given to it by later chroniclers, but he is also known for his accounts of the miracles of saints, especially four books of the miracles of Martin of Tours. St Martin's tomb was a major draw in the 6th century, and Gregory's writings had the practical aspect of promoting this highly organized devotion
July 17, 607 Ali the cousin and son-in-law of the Islamic prophet Muhammad, ruling over the Islamic Caliphate from 656 to 661. A son of Abu Talib, Ali was also the first male who accepted Islam. Sunnis consider Ali the fourth and final of the Rashidun , while Shias regard Ali as the first Imam after Muḥammad, and consider him and his descendants the rightful successors to Muhammad, all of whom are members of the Ahl al-Bayt, the household of Muhammad. This disagreement split the Ummah into the Sunni and Shi`i branches
March 17, 624 Amr ibn Hishām one of the Meccan polytheist pagan Qurayshi leaders known for his hostility against the Islamic prophet Muhammad and the early Muslims in Mecca. He was one of the arch-enemies of Muḥammad and the flag-bearer of disbelief and hatred towards Islam and the early Muslims. His malevolence and enmity was to such an extent that Muhammad gave him the title of ‘The Pharaoh of this Ummah’. Muhammad also said, “He who calls Abu Jahl 'Abu Hakam' has made a serious mistake. He should seek forgiveness from Allah for this.”
June 17, 629 Shahrbaraz king of the Sasanian Empire from 27 April 629 to 17 June 629. He usurped the throne from Ardashir III, and was killed by Sasanian nobles after forty days. Before usurping the Sasanian throne he was a general under Khosrau His name Shahrbaraz is actually an honorific title, and means "the Boar of the Empire", attesting to his dexterity in military command and his warlike person, as the boar was the animal associated with the Zoroastrian Izad Vahram, the epitome of victory
November 17, 641 Emperor Jomei the 34th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.
April 17, 656 Peada of Mercia briefly King of southern Mercia after his father's death in November 655 until his own death in the spring of the next year.
June 17, 656 Uthman a companion of the Islamic prophet Muhammad, and the third of the Sunni Rashidun or "Rightly Guided Caliphs". Born into a prominent Meccan clan of the Quraysh tribe, he played a major role in early Islamic history, succeeding Umar ibn al-Khattab as caliph at age 65. He was also the prophet's son-in-law twice, being married to two of the prophet’s daughters Ruqayyah and Umm Kulthum
December 17, 658 Judicael ap Hoel the King of Domnonée and a Breton high king in the mid-seventh century.
March 17, 659 Gertrude of Nivelles a seventh-century abbess who, with her mother Itta, founded the Benedictine monastery of Nivelles in present-day Belgium. Although she was never formally canonized, in 1677 Pope Clement XII declared her universal feast day to be March 17. She is the patron saint of travelers, gardeners, and cats, and against rats and mental illness
February 17, 661 Finan of Lindisfarne an Irish monk, trained at Iona in Scotland, who became the second Bishop of Lindisfarne from 651 until 661.
June 17, 676 Pope Adeodatus II Pope from 11 April 672 to his death in 676. Little is known about him. Most surviving records indicate that Adeodatus was known for his generosity, especially when it came to the poor and to pilgrims
December 17, 693 Begga the daughter of Pepin of Landen, mayor of the palace of Austrasia, and his wife Itta von Swaibia. On the death of her husband, she took the veil, founded seven churches, and built a convent at Andenne on the Meuse River where she spent the rest of her days as abbess. She was buried in Saint Begga's Collegiate Church in Andenne
October 17, 739 Nothhelm a medieval Anglo-Saxon Archbishop of Canterbury. A correspondent of both Bede and Boniface, it was Nothhelm who gathered materials from Canterbury for Bede's historical works. After his appointment to the archbishopric in 735, he attended to ecclesiastical matters, including holding church councils. Although later antiquaries felt that Nothhelm was the author of a number of works, later research has shown them to be authored by others. After his death he was considered a saint
April 17, 744 Al-Walid II an Umayyad caliph who ruled from 743 until 744. He succeeded his uncle, Hisham ibn Abd al-Malik
August 17, 754 Carloman (mayor of the palace) the eldest son of Charles Martel, majordomo or mayor of the palace and duke of the Franks, and his wife Chrotrud of Treves. On Charles's death , Carloman and his brother Pepin the Short succeeded to their father's legal positions, Carloman in Austrasia, and Pepin in Neustria. He was a member of the family later called the Carolingians and it can be argued that he was instrumental in consolidating their power at the expense of the ruling Merovingian kings of the Franks. He withdrew from public life in 747 to take up the monastic habit, "the first of a new type of saintly king," according to Norman Cantor, "more interested in religious devotion than royal power, who frequently appeared in the following three centuries and who was an indication of the growing impact of Christian piety on Germanic society"
December 17, 779 Saint Sturm a disciple of Saint Boniface and founder and first abbot of the Benedictine monastery and abbey of Fulda in 742 or 744. Sturm's tenure as abbot lasted from 747 until 779
March 17, 787 Han Huang an official of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty, serving as a chancellor during the reign of Emperor Dezong. He was praised by traditional historians for his frugality and personal integrity, but blamed for being overly harsh and cruel in his governance
December 17, 796 Ecgfrith of Mercia king of Mercia from July to December 796. He was the son of Offa, the greatest king of Mercia, and Cynethryth. In 787, Ecgfrith had been consecrated king, the first known consecration of an English king, probably arranged by Offa in imitation of the consecration of Charlemagne's sons by the pope in 781
June 17, 811 Sakanoue no Tamuramaro a general and shogun of the early Heian Period of Japan. He was the son of Sakanoue no Karitamaro
April 17, 818 Bernard of Italy the King of the Lombards from 810 to 818. He plotted against his uncle, Emperor Louis the Pious, when the latter's Ordinatio Imperii made Bernard a vassal of his cousin Lothair. When his plot was discovered, Louis had him blinded, a procedure which killed him
June 17, 850 Tachibana no Kachiko a Japanese empress, the chief consort of Emperor Saga and the daughter of Tachibana no Kiyotomo.
July 17, 855 Pope Leo IV Pope from 10 April 847 to his death in 855.
April 17, 858 Pope Benedict III Pope from 29 September 855 to his death in 858.
October 17, 866 Al-Musta'in the Abbasid Caliph from 862 to 866, during the "Anarchy at Samarra". After the death of previous Caliph, al-Muntasir , the Turkish military leaders held a council to select his successor. They were not willing to have al-Mu'tazz or his brothers; so they elected Al-Musta'in, a grandson of al-Mu'tasim
November 17, 885 Liutgard of Saxony the wife and Queen of Louis the Younger, the Frankish King of Saxony and East Francia.
July 17, 924 Edward the Elder an English king. He became king in 899 upon the death of his father, Alfred the Great. His court was at Winchester, previously the capital of Wessex. He captured the eastern Midlands and East Anglia from the Danes in 917 and became ruler of Mercia in 918 upon the death of Æthelflæd, his sister
December 17, 942 William I of Normandy the second ruler of Normandy, from 927 until his assassination.
May 17, 946 Al-Qa'im Bi-Amrillah the second Caliph of the Fatimid Caliphate in Ifriqiya and ruled from 934 to 946. He is the 12th Imam according to Isma'ili Fatemi faith
June 17, 1025 Bolesław I Chrobry a Duke of Poland during 992–1025 and the first crowned King of Poland since 18 April 1025 until his death two months later. He was also Duke of Bohemia as Boleslav IV during 1002–03
September 17, 1025 Hugh Magnus co-King of France under his father, Robert II, from 1017 until his death in 1025. He was a member of the House of Capet, a son of Robert II by his third wife, Constance of Arles
March 17, 1040 Harold Harefoot King of England from 1035 to 1040. His cognomen "Harefoot" referred to his speed, and the skill of his huntsmanship. He was the younger son of Cnut the Great, king of England, Denmark, and Norway by his first wife, Ælfgifu of Northampton
March 17, 1058 Lulach King of Scots between 15 August 1057 and 17 March 1058.
July 17, 1070 Baldwin VI Count of Flanders a Belgian nobleman. He was the ruling count of Hainaut from 1051 to 1070 and Count of Flanders from 1067 to 1070
April 17, 1080 Harald III of Denmark King of Denmark from 1074 to 1080. Harald III was an illegitimate son of Danish king Sweyn II Estridsson, and contested the crown with some of his brothers. He was a peaceful ruler who initiated a number of reforms. Harald was married to his cousin Margareta Hasbjörnsdatter, but did not leave any heirs, and was succeeded by his brother Canute IV the Saint. Four of his half-brothers were in turn crowned Danish kings