Born on 2nd day

August 2, 216 Marcus Minucius Rufus a Roman consul in 221 He was also Magister Equitum during the dictatorship of Quintus Fabius Maximus Verrucosus known as Cunctator.
August 2, 216 Gnaeus Servilius Geminus a Roman consul, serving as both general and admiral of Roman forces, during the Second Punic War.
March 2, 283 Eusebius of Vercelli a bishop and saint in Italy. Along with Athanasius, he affirmed the divinity of Jesus against Arianism
November 2, 293 Justus of Trieste a Roman Catholic saint.
July 2, 419 Valentinian III Western Roman Emperor from 425 to 455. His reign was marked by the ongoing dismemberment of the Western Empire
February 2, 450 Justin I Byzantine Emperor from 518 to 527. He rose through the ranks of the army and ultimately became its emperor, in spite of the fact he was illiterate and almost 70 years old at the time of accession. His reign is significant for the founding of the Justinian Dynasty that included his eminent nephew Justinian I and for the enactment of laws that de-emphasized the influence of the old Roman nobility. His consort was Empress Euphemia
November 2, 682 Umar II an Umayyad caliph who ruled from 717 to 720. He was also a cousin of the former caliph, being the son of Abd al-Malik's younger brother, Abd al-Aziz. He was also a female-line great-grandson of the second caliph Umar ibn Al-Khattab
July 2, 866 Robert the Strong Margrave in Neustria. His family is named after him and called the Robertians. In 853 he was named missus dominicus by Charles the Bald, King of West Francia. He was the father of two kings of West Francia Odo and Robert I of France. Robert the Strong was the great-grandfather of Hugh Capet and thus the ancestor of all the Capetians
April 2, 872 Muflih al-Turki a Turkish military officer of the Abbasid Caliphate in the mid-9th century. He played a prominent role in the events known as the Anarchy at Samarra, but was killed in battle against the Zanj rebels of southern Iraq
November 2, 934 Emma of France a French princess by birth and queen by marriage. She was the daughter of Robert I of France and either Aelis of Maine or Béatrice of Vermandois. Her family is known as the Robertians
November 2, 971 Mahmud of Ghazni the most prominent ruler of the Ghaznavid Empire. He conquered the eastern Iranian lands and the northwestern Indian subcontinent from 997 to his death in 1030. Mahmud turned the former provincial city of Ghazna into the wealthy capital of an extensive empire which covered most of today's Afghanistan, eastern Iran, and Pakistan, by looting the riches and wealth from the then Indian subcontinent. He was the first ruler to carry the title Sultan , signifying the extent of his power, though preserving the ideological link to the suzerainty of the Abbassid Caliphate. During his rule, he invaded and plundered parts of Hindustan 17 times
November 2, 1154 Constance Queen of Sicily the heiress of the Norman kings of Sicily and the wife of Henry VI, Holy Roman Emperor. She was Queen of Sicily in 1194–98, jointly with her husband from 1194 to 1197, and with her infant son Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor, in 1198
June 2, 1202 Margaret II Countess of Flanders countess of Flanders from 1244 to 1278 and also, countess of Hainaut from 1244 to 1253 and again from 1257 until her death.
February 2, 1208 James I of Aragon King of Aragon, Valencia and Majorca, Count of Barcelona and Lord of Montpellier from 1213 to 1276. His long reign saw the expansion of the House of Aragón on all sides: into Valencia to the south, Languedoc to the north, and the Balearic Islands to the east. By a treaty with Louis IX of France, he wrested the county of Barcelona from nominal French suzerainty and integrated it into his crown. His part in the Reconquista was similar in Mediterranean Spain to that of his contemporary Ferdinand III of Castile in Andalusia
November 2, 1235 Henry of Almain the son of Richard, 1st Earl of Cornwall and Isabel Marshal.
March 2, 1241 Isabella of France Queen of Navarre a daughter of Louis IX of France and Margaret of Provence. She was married to Theobald II of Navarre, eldest son of Theobald I of Navarre and Margaret of Navarre on 6 April 1255. Isabelle became Queen consort of Navarre
September 2, 1243 Gilbert de Clare 7th Earl of Gloucester a powerful English noble. Also known as "Red" Gilbert de Clare or "The red earl", probably because of his hair colour or fiery temper in battle
November 2, 1271 Emperor Gong of Song the 7th Emperor of the Chinese Southern Song Dynasty. He reigned from 1274 until his abdication in 1276 CE when he was succeeded by his elder brother, Emperor Duanzong of Song
November 2, 1287 Nasr Sultan of Granada a son of Muhammed II al-Faqih and the fourth Nasrid ruler of the Moorish Emirate of Granada in Al-Andalus on the Iberian Peninsula.
November 2, 1299 Alfonso IV of Aragon the King of Aragon and Count of Barcelona from 1327 to his death. He was born in Naples, the second son of James II and Blanche of Anjou. His reign saw the incorporation of the County of Urgell, Duchy of Athens, and Duchy of Neopatria into the Crown of Aragon
June 2, 1305 Abu Sa'id Bahadur Khan the ninth ruler of the Ilkhanate state in Iran.
May 2, 1308 Joan III Countess of Burgundy a reigning Countess of Burgundy and Artois, and a Duchess consort of Burgundy. She was the eldest daughter of King Philip V of France and Joan II of Burgundy. She
October 2, 1338 Ismail II Sultan of Granada the second son of Yusuf I and the ninth Nasrid ruler of the Moorish Emirate of Granada in Al-Andalus on the Iberian Peninsula. He reigned from August 1359 until June 1360
April 2, 1348 Andronikos IV Palaiologos Byzantine Emperor from 1376 to 1379.
May 2, 1360 Yongle Emperor the third emperor of the Ming Dynasty in China, reigning from 1402 to 1424.
November 2, 1361 Isabella Countess of Foix the daughter of Roger Bernard V, Viscount of Castelbon and his wife Gerauda of Navailles. She was Countess of Foix in her own right, but shared power with her husband. She succeeded as Countess, along with her husband upon the childless death of her brother Matthew, Count of Foix
July 2, 1363 Maria Queen of Sicily Queen of Sicily and Duchess of Athens and Neopatria from 1377 until her death.
August 2, 1373 Adolph I Duke of Cleves the second Count of Cleves and the fourth Count of Mark.
March 2, 1377 Edmund Stafford 5th Earl of Stafford the son of Hugh de Stafford, 2nd Earl of Stafford and Philippa de Beauchamp.
January 2, 1403 Basilios Bessarion one of the illustrious Greek scholars who contributed to the great revival of letters in the 15th century. He has been mistakenly known also as Johannes Bessarion due to an erroneous interpretation of Gregory III Mammas
March 2, 1409 Jean II Duke of Alençon the son of John I of Alençon and his wife Marie of Brittany, Lady of La Guerche , daughter of John V, Duke of Brittany and Joan of Navarre. He succeeded his father as Duke of Alençon and Count of Perche as a minor in 1415, after the latter's death at the Battle of Agincourt. He is best known as a general in the Last Phase of the Hundred Years' War and for his role as a comrade-in-arms of Joan of Arc, who called him "le beau duc"
April 2, 1412 Ruy Gonzáles de Clavijo a Castilian traveller and writer. In 1403-05 Clavijo was the ambassador of Henry III of Castile to the court of Timur, founder and ruler of the Timurid Empire. A diary of the journey, perhaps based on detailed notes kept while traveling, was later published in Spanish in 1582 and in English in 1859
August 2, 1417 Shin Suk-ju a Korean politician and soldier during the Joseon Dynasty. He served as Prime Minister from 1461 to 1464 and from 1471 to 1475
June 2, 1423 Ferdinand I of Naples the King of Naples from 1458 to 1494. He was the son of Alfonso V of Aragon and his mistress, Giraldona Carlino
August 2, 1424 John II Duke of Lorraine Duke of Lorraine from 1453 to his death. He inherited the duchy from his mother, Duchess Isabelle, during the life of his father, Duke René of Anjou, also Duke of Lorraine and titular king of Naples. As heir-apparent of Naples, he was styled the Duke of Calabria, and spent most of his time engaging in plots for Angevin recovery of Naples. In 1466, the Catalonians chose his father as King of Aragon, and he was created Prince of Girona, as heir-apparent. He went into Catalonia to press the family's claims, but died, supposedly by poison, in Barcelona
February 2, 1426 Eleanor of Navarre Aragon , Regent and the queen regnant of Navarre in 1479. She was crowned on 28 January 1479 in Tudela
November 2, 1428 Yolande Duchess of Lorraine Duchess of Lorraine and Bar. She was the daughter of Isabella, Duchess of Lorraine, and René of Anjou. Because of her various titles she is also known as Yolande de Lorraine and Yolande d'Anjou. Her younger sister was Margaret of Anjou, Queen consort of Henry VI of England. Though she was nominally in control of major territories, she ceded her power and titles to her husband and her son
May 2, 1437 Filippo Buonaccorsi an Italian humanist and writer.
May 2, 1451 René II Duke of Lorraine Count of Vaudémont from 1470, Duke of Lorraine from 1473, and Duke of Bar from 1483 to 1508. He claimed the crown of the Kingdom of Naples and the County of Provence as the Duke of Calabria 1480–1493 and as King of Naples and Jerusalem 1493–1508. He succeeded his uncle John of Vaudémont as Count of Harcourt in 1473, exchanging it for the county of Aumale in 1495. He succeeded as Count of Guise in 1504
October 2, 1452 Richard III of England King of England from 1483 until his death in 1485 in the Battle of Bosworth Field. He was the last king of the House of York and the last of the Plantagenet dynasty. His defeat at Bosworth Field, the last decisive battle of the Wars of the Roses, marks the end of the Middle Ages in England. He is the subject of the play Richard III by William Shakespeare
February 2, 1455 John King of Denmark King of Denmark , Norway and as John II of Sweden in the Kalmar Union, and also Duke of Schleswig and Holstein. The three most important political goals of King John were the restoration of the Kalmar Union, reduction of the dominance of the Hanseatic League, and the building of a strong Danish royal power
August 2, 1455 John Cicero Elector of Brandenburg Elector of Brandenburg from 1486 until his death, the fourth of the House of Hohenzollern. After his death he received the cognomen Cicero, after the Roman orator Cicero, but the elector's eloquence and interest in the arts is doubtful
February 2, 1457 Peter Martyr d'Anghiera an Italian-born historian of Spain and its discoveries during the Age of Exploration. He wrote the first accounts of explorations in Central and South America in a series of letters and reports, grouped in the original Latin publications of 1511 to 1530 into sets of ten chapters called "decades." His Decades are of great value in the history of geography and discovery. His De Orbe Novo describes the first contacts of Europeans and Native Americans, Native American civilizations in the Caribbean and North America, as well as Mesoamerica, and includes, for example, the first European reference to India rubber. It was first translated into English in 1555, and in a fuller version in 1912
May 2, 1458 Eleanor of Viseu a Portuguese infanta and later queen consort of Portugal.
March 2, 1459 Pope Adrian VI the 218th pope of the Catholic Church from 9 January 1522 until his death on 14 September 1523.
January 2, 1462 Piero di Cosimo an Italian Renaissance painter.
October 2, 1470 Isabella of Aragon Duchess of Milan the daughter of King Alfonso II of Naples and Ippolita Maria Sforza. From 1489 to 1494, she was the Duchess consort of Milan, and from 1499 to 1524 the suo jure Duchess of Bari and Princess of Rossano. After her brother Ferdinand II's death, she was the heir of the Brienne claim to the title King of Jerusalem
November 2, 1470 Edward V of England King of England from his father Edward IV's death on 9 April 1483 until 26 June of the same year. He was never crowned, and his 86-day reign was dominated by the influence of his uncle and Lord Protector, Richard, Duke of Gloucester, who succeeded him as Richard III on 26 June 1483; this was confirmed by the Act entitled Titulus Regius, which denounced any further claims through his father's heirs. Edward and his younger brother Richard of Shrewsbury, Duke of York were the Princes in the Tower who disappeared after being sent to heavily guarded royal lodgings in the Tower of London. Responsibility for their deaths is widely attributed to Richard III, but the lack of any solid evidence and conflicting contemporary accounts suggest four other primary suspects
April 2, 1473 John Corvinus King of Bosnia. He was the illegitimate son of Matthias Corvinus, King of Hungary, and his mistress, Barbara Edelpöck
September 2, 1473 Ercole Strozzi an Italian poet, the son of Tito Vespasiano Strozzi. He was a friend of Lucrezia Borgia, and was murdered in Ferrara