Died on 2nd day

August 2, 257 Pope Stephen I the bishop of Rome from 12 May 254 to his death in 257. Of Roman birth but of Greek ancestry, he became bishop after serving as archdeacon of Pope Lucius I, who appointed Stephen his successor
March 2, 274 Mani (prophet) now extinct. Mani was born in or near Seleucia-Ctesiphon in Parthian Babylonia , at the time still part of the Parthian Empire. Six of his major works were written in Syriac Aramaic, and the seventh, dedicated to the king of the empire, Shapur I, was written in Middle Persian, his native language. He died in Gundeshapur, under the Sassanid Empire
May 2, 373 Athanasius of Alexandria the twentieth bishop of Alexandria. His episcopate lasted 45 years , of which over 17 were spent in five exiles ordered by four different Roman emperors. Athanasius is a renowned Christian theologian, a Church Father, the chief defender of Trinitarianism against Arianism, and a noted Egyptian leader of the fourth century
September 2, 421 Constantius III Western Roman Emperor for seven months in 421. A prominent general and politician, he was the power behind the throne for much of the 410s, and in 421 briefly became co-emperor of the Western Empire with Honorius
September 2, 459 Simeon Stylites a Syriac ascetic saint who achieved fame for living 37 years on a small platform on top of a pillar near Aleppo in Syria. Several other stylites later followed his model. He is known formally as Saint Simeon Stylites the Elder to distinguish him from Simeon Stylites the Younger, Simeon Stylites III and Saint Symeon Stylites of Lesbos
October 2, 534 Athalaric the King of the Ostrogoths in Italy. He was a son of Eutharic and Amalasuntha. His maternal grandfather was Theoderic the Great. He succeeded his grandfather as king in 526
April 2, 573 Nicetius of Lyon Archbishop of Lyon, then Lugdunum, France, during the 6th century. He served from 552 or 553. He was ordained as a priest by Agricola, Bishop of Châlons-sur-Marne. He was the nephew of Saint Sacerdos, bishop of Lyon, and his successor. He revived ecclesiastical chant in his diocese
September 2, 595 Patriarch John IV of Constantinople the 33rd bishop or Patriarch of Constantinople. He was the first to assume the title Ecumenical Patriarch. He is regarded as a saint by the Eastern Orthodox Church which holds a feast on September 2
February 2, 619 Laurence of Canterbury the second Archbishop of Canterbury from about 604 to 619. He was a member of the Gregorian mission sent from Italy to England to Christianize the Anglo-Saxons from their native Anglo-Saxon paganism, although the date of his arrival is disputed. He was consecrated archbishop by his predecessor, Augustine of Canterbury, during Augustine's lifetime, to ensure continuity in the office. While archbishop, he attempted unsuccessfully to resolve differences with the native British bishops by corresponding with them about points of dispute. Laurence faced a crisis following the death of King Æthelberht of Kent, when the king's successor abandoned Christianity; he eventually reconverted. Laurence was revered as a saint after his death in 619
July 2, 626 Li Jiancheng a crown prince of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty. He was the oldest son of the founding emperor Emperor Gaozu and therefore was designated crown prince after the founding of the dynasty in 618. However, although he himself was fairly capable as a general, he was overshadowed by the contributions of his younger brother Li Shimin the Prince of Qin, and the brothers contended for power for years, with Li Jiancheng aided by another younger brother, Li Yuanji the Prince of In 626, Li Shimin, fearing that Li Jiancheng and Li Yuanji were about to kill him, laid an ambush for them at Xuanwu Gate outside the palace and killed them. Li Shimin then effectively forced Emperor Gaozu to yield the throne to him
July 2, 626 Li Yuanji an imperial prince of the Chinese Tang Dynasty. He was a son of the dynasty's founder Emperor Gaozu of Tang , and in the intense rivalry developed between his older brothers Li Jiancheng the Crown Prince and Li Shimin the Prince of Qin, he sided with Li Jiancheng and often advocated drastic actions against Li Shimin, including assassination. In 626, Li Shimin, fearing that Li Jiancheng and Li Yuanji were about to kill him, laid an ambush for them at Xuanwu Gate outside the palace and killed them. Li Shimin then effectively forced Emperor Gaozu to yield the throne to him
March 2, 640 Bilal Ibn Rabah one of the most trusted and loyal Sahabah of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. He was born in Mecca and is considered as the first muezzin, chosen by Muhammad himself. Born as a slave, Bilal was among the emancipated slaves freed by Abu Bakr due to the Islamic teachings of slavery. He was known for his beautiful voice with which he called people to their prayers. He died sometime between 638 to 642, when he was just over sixty years old. Bilal ibn Rabah, rose to a position of prominence in Islam. His respected stature during the birth of Islam is often cited by Muslims as evidence of the importance of pluralism and racial equality in the foundations of the religion
August 2, 640 Pope Severinus Pope from 28 May to his death in 640. He became caught up in a power struggle with the Byzantine Emperor Heraclius over the ongoing Monothelite controversy
July 2, 649 Li Jing (general) a general and one time chancellor of the Chinese Tang Dynasty. In 630, Li Jing defeated the Eastern Tujue Jiali Khan Ashina Duobi with just 3,000 cavalry soldiers in a surprise attack, allowing Tang to subjugate Eastern Tujue and reduce it to a vassal state. He and Li Shiji were considered the two most prominent early Tang generals
September 2, 652 Abu Sufyan ibn Harb the leader of the Quraish tribe of Mecca. He was a staunch opponent of the Islamic prophet Muhammad before accepting Islam and becoming a Muslim warrior later in his life. His mother, Safia, is the paternal aunt of Maymuna bint al-Harith
March 2, 672 Chad of Mercia a prominent 7th century Anglo-Saxon churchman, who became abbot of several monasteries, Bishop of the Northumbrians and subsequently Bishop of the Mercians and Lindsey People. He was later canonised as a saint. He was the brother of Cedd, also a saint. He features strongly in the work of Bede the Venerable and is credited, together with Cedd, with introducing Christianity to the Mercian kingdom
August 2, 686 Pope John V Pope from 12 July 685 to his death in 686. He was the first pope of the Byzantine Papacy allowed to be consecrated by the Byzantine Emperor without prior consent, and the first in a line of ten consecutive popes of Eastern origin. His papacy was marked by reconciliation between the city of Rome and the Empire
August 2, 713 Princess Taiping a princess of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty and her mother Wu Zetian's Zhou Dynasty. She was the youngest daughter of Wu Zetian and Emperor Gaozong and was powerful during the reigns of her mother and her elder brothers Emperor Zhongzong and Emperor Ruizong , particularly during Emperor Ruizong's second reign
January 2, 827 Adalard of Corbie son of Bernard the son of Charles Martel and half-brother of Pepin; Charlemagne was his cousin.
October 2, 829 Michael II surnamed the Amorian or the Stammerer , reigned as Byzantine Emperor from December 820 to his death on 2 October 829, the first ruler of the Phrygian or Amorian dynasty.
September 2, 831 Yuan Zhen more known as an important Chinese writer and poet. In prose literature, Yuan Zhen is particularly known for his work Yingying's Biography , which has often been adapted for other treatments, including operatic and musical ones. In poetry, he is remembered for the inclusion of some of his poems by popular anthologies, his verses on exotic topics , and for being part of the group of "New Yuefu" poets, which often used poetry as a form of expression and protest, but one potentially subtle enough to avoid the likely repercussions of more direct criticism. The poetic circle in which Yuan Zhen was involved included Bai Juyi, among others. Politically Yuan Zhen was briefly chancellor, during the reign of Emperor Muzong
July 2, 862 Swithun an Anglo-Saxon bishop of Winchester and subsequently patron saint of Winchester Cathedral. His historical importance as bishop is overshadowed by his reputation for posthumous miracle-working. According to tradition, the weather on his feast day will continue for forty days. The precise meaning and origin of Swithun's name is unknown, but it most likely derives from the Old English word swiþ, 'strong'
February 2, 880 Bruno Duke of Saxony Duke of Saxony from 866 to his death. He was the eldest son of the Saxon count Liudolf and his wife, Oda of Billung. Bruno is rated as the progenitor of the Brunonen noble family, a branch of the Ottonian dynasty. However some mentions appear to refer to an earlier Saxon margrave Brun the Younger, possibly a grandfather, but this is unclear
June 2, 891 Al-Muwaffaq an Abbasid prince and military leader, who acted as the virtual regent of the Abbasid Caliphate for most of the reign of his brother, Caliph al-Mu'tamid. His stabilization of the internal political scene after the decade-long "Anarchy at Samarra", his successful defence of Iraq against the Saffarids and the suppression of the Zanj Rebellion restored a measure of the Caliphate's former power and began a period of recovery, which culminated in the reign of al-Muwaffaq's own son, the Caliph al-Mu'tadid
May 2, 907 Boris I of Bulgaria the Knyaz of the First Bulgarian Empire in 852–889. At the time of his baptism in 864, Boris was named Michael after his godfather, Emperor Michael III. The historian Steven Runciman called him one of the greatest persons in history
June 2, 910 Richilde of Provence the second consort of Charles the Bald, King and Emperor of the Franks. By her marriage, she became Queen of the West Franks, and then Empress of the Franks. She also served as regent
August 2, 924 Ælfweard of Wessex the second son of Edward the Elder, the eldest born to his second wife Ælfflæd.
July 2, 936 Henry the Fowler the Duke of Saxony from 912 and the King of Germany from 919 until his death. First of the Ottonian Dynasty of German kings and emperors, he is generally considered to be the founder and first king of the medieval German state, known until then as East Francia. An avid hunter, he obtained the epithet "the Fowler" because he was allegedly fixing his birding nets when messengers arrived to inform him that he was to be king
October 2, 939 Gilbert Duke of Lorraine the duke of Lotharingia until 939.
June 2, 958 Oda of Canterbury a 10th-century Archbishop of Canterbury in England. The son of a Danish invader, Oda became Bishop of Ramsbury before 928. A number of stories were told about his actions both prior to becoming and while a bishop, but few of these incidents are recorded in contemporary accounts. After being named to Canterbury in 941, Oda was instrumental in crafting royal legislation as well as involved in providing rules for his clergy. Oda was also involved in the efforts to reform religious life in England. He died in 958 and legendary tales afterwards were ascribed to him. Later he came to be regarded as a saint, and a hagiography was written in the late 11th or early 12th century
March 2, 968 William (archbishop of Mainz) Archbishop of Mainz from 17 December 954 until his death. He was the son of the Emperor Otto I the Great and a Slav mother
March 2, 986 Lothair of France the Carolingian king of West Francia from 10 September 954.
September 2, 1022 Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill King of Mide and High King of Ireland. His great victory at the Battle of Tara against Olaf Cuaran in 980 resulted in Gaelic control of the Kingdom of Dublin
September 2, 1031 Saint Emeric of Hungary the son of King Stephen I of Hungary and Giselle of Bavaria. He is assumed to be the second son of Stephen, he was named after his uncle, Henry II, and was the only of Stephen's sons who reached adulthood
August 2, 1058 Judith of Schweinfurt a Duchess of Bohemia.
April 2, 1075 Al-Qa'im (caliph) the Abbasid Caliph in Baghdad from 1031 to 1075. He was the son of the previous Caliph al-Qadir
August 2, 1079 Roman Svyatoslavich prince of Tmutarakan in Kievan Rus'. The starting year of his reign is uncertain, but he reigned his principality from around 1073 or 1077. His former allies, the Cumans killed him after their unsuccessful joint campaign against his uncle, Vsevolod I of Kiev
November 2, 1083 Matilda of Flanders the wife of William the Conqueror and, as such, Queen of England. She bore William nine children, including two kings, William II and Henry I
January 2, 1096 William de St-Calais a medieval Norman monk, abbot of the abbey of Saint-Vincent in Le Mans in Maine, who was nominated by King William I of England as Bishop of Durham in 1080. During his term as bishop, St-Calais replaced the canons of his cathedral chapter with monks, and began the construction of Durham Cathedral. In addition to his ecclesiastical duties, he served as a commissioner for the Domesday Book. He was also a councilor and advisor to both King William I and his son, King William II, known as William Rufus. Following William Rufus' accession to the throne in 1087, St-Calais is considered by scholars to have been the new king's chief advisor
August 2, 1100 William II of England King of England from 1087 until 1100, with powers over Normandy, and influence in Scotland. He was less successful in extending control into Wales. William is commonly known as William Rufus or William the Red, perhaps because of his red-faced appearance
January 2, 1105 Theodoric I Count of Montbéliard a Count of Montbéliard, Count of Bar and lord of Mousson and Count of Verdun. He was the son of Louis, Count of Montbéliard, and Sophie, Countess of Bar and Lady of Mousson
April 2, 1118 Baldwin I of Jerusalem one of the leaders of the First Crusade, who became the first Count of Edessa and then the second ruler and first titled King of Jerusalem. He was the brother of Godfrey of Bouillon, who was the first ruler of the crusader state of Jerusalem, although Godfrey refused the title of 'king' which Baldwin accepted
March 2, 1121 Floris II Count of Holland the first from the native dynasty of Holland to be called Count of Holland.
February 2, 1124 Bořivoj II Duke of Bohemia the duke of Bohemia from 25 December 1100 until May 1107 and from December 1117 until 16 August 1120. He was the younger half-brother and successor of Bretislaus His father was Vratislav II of Bohemia, his mother Świętosława of Poland
March 2, 1127 Charles I Count of Flanders Count of Flanders from 1119 to 1127. He is most remembered for his murder and its aftermath
November 2, 1148 Saint Malachy an Irish saint and Archbishop of Armagh, to whom were attributed several miracles and an alleged vision of 112 Popes later attributed to the apocalyptic list of Prophecy of the Popes. He was the first native born Irish saint to be canonised
February 2, 1154 Viacheslav I of Kiev Vladimirovich , Prince of Smolensk , Turov , Pereyaslavl , Peresopnitsa , Vyshgorod and Grand Prince of Kiev.
September 2, 1179 Taira no Shigemori the eldest son of the Taira clan patriarch, Taira no Kiyomori. He took part in the Hōgen and Heiji rebellions. He died of illness in 1179
December 2, 1198 Ruaidrí Ua Conchobair King of Connacht from 1156 to 1186, and High King of Ireland from 1166 to 1183. He was the last High King of Ireland before the Norman invasion
February 2, 1212 Bernhard Count of Anhalt a German prince of the House of Ascania, Count of Anhalt and Ballenstedt, and Lord of Bernburg through his paternal inheritance. From 1180 he was also Duke of Saxony as Bernhard III or Bernhard I