Died on 20th day

August 20, 2 Lucius Caesar the second son of Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa and Julia the Elder. He was born between 14 of June and 15 July 17 BC with the name Lucius Vipsanius Agrippa, but when he was adopted by his maternal grandfather Roman Emperor Caesar Augustus, his name was changed to Lucius Julius Caesar. In the year of his birth, his maternal grandfather Caesar Augustus adopted him and his brother Gaius Caesar. He and his brother were raised and educated by their grandparents
April 20, 168 Pope Anicetus the Bishop of Rome from 157 to his death in 168. According to the Annuario Pontificio, the start of his papacy may have been 153. His name is Greek for unconquered. According to the Liber Pontificalis, Anicetus was a Syrian from the city of Emesa
December 20, 217 Pope Zephyrinus bishop of Rome or pope from 199 to his death in 217. He was born in Rome. His predecessor was Pope Victor Upon his death on 20 December 217, he was succeeded by his principal advisor, Pope Callixtus I
January 20, 250 Pope Fabian the Bishop of Rome from 10 January 236 to his death in 250, succeeding Anterus. He is famous for the miraculous nature of his election, in which a dove is said to have descended on his head to mark him as the Holy Spirit's unexpected choice to become the next pope. He was succeeded by Cornelius
November 20, 284 Numerian Roman Emperor from 282 to 284 with his older brother Carinus. They were sons of Carus, a general raised to the office of praetorian prefect under Emperor Probus in 282
July 20, 384 Pope Timothy I of Alexandria 22nd Pope of Alexandria & Patriarch of the See of Mark.
October 20, 460 Aelia Eudocia the wife of Theodosius II, and a prominent historical figure in understanding the rise of Christianity during the beginning of the Byzantine Empire. Eudocia lived in a world where Greek paganism and Christianity were existing side by side with both pagans and unorthodox Christians being persecuted. Although Eudocia's work has been mostly ignored by modern scholars, her poetry and literary work are great examples of how her Christian faith and Greek upbringing were intertwined, exemplifying a legacy that the Byzantine Empire left behind on the Christian world
January 20, 473 Euthymius the Great an abbot in Palestine venerated in both Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches.
June 20, 537 Pope Silverius Pope from 8 June 536 to his deposition in 537, a few months before his death.
January 20, 640 Eadbald of Kent King of Kent from 616 until his death in 640. He was the son of King Æthelberht and his wife Bertha, a daughter of the Merovingian king Charibert. Æthelberht made Kent the dominant force in England during his reign and became the first Anglo-Saxon king to convert to Christianity from Anglo-Saxon paganism. Eadbald's accession was a significant setback for the growth of the church, since he retained his indigenous paganism and did not convert to Christianity for at least a year, and perhaps for as much as eight years. He was ultimately converted by either Laurentius or Justus, and separated from his first wife, who had been his stepmother, at the insistence of the church. Eadbald's second wife was Emma, who may have been a Frankish princess. She bore him two sons, Eormenred and Eorcenberht, and a daughter, Eanswith
August 20, 651 Oswine of Deira a King of Deira in northern England.
May 20, 685 Ecgfrith of Northumbria the King of Deira from 664 until 670, and then King of Northumbria from 670 until his death, succeeding his father Oswiu. He ruled over Northumbria when it was at the height of its power, but his reign ended with a disastrous defeat at the Battle of Nechtansmere in which he lost his life
March 20, 687 Cuthbert a saint of the early Northumbrian church in the Celtic tradition. He was a monk, bishop and hermit, associated with the monasteries of Melrose and Lindisfarne in what might loosely be termed the Kingdom of Northumbria in the Northeast of England. After his death he became one of the most important medieval saints of Northern England, with a cult centred on his tomb at Durham Cathedral. Cuthbert is regarded as the patron saint of northern England. His feast day is 20 March
April 20, 689 Cædwalla of Wessex the King of Wessex from approximately 685 until he abdicated in 688. His name is derived from the British Cadwallon. He was exiled from Wessex as a youth and during his exile gathered forces and attacked the South Saxons, killing their king, Æthelwealh, in what is now Sussex. Cædwalla was unable to hold the South Saxon territory, however, and was driven out by Æthelwealh's ealdormen. In either 685 or 686 he became King of Wessex. He may have been involved in suppressing rival dynasties at this time, as an early source records that Wessex was ruled by underkings until Cædwalla
February 20, 702 K'inich Kan B'alam II king of the pre-Columbian Maya polity of Baakal in the Classic period of Mesoamerican chronology, based around the ceremonial center and city now known as the Maya archaeological site of Palenque. Kan B'alam took the throne on January 10, 684, several months after the death of his father and predecessor, Pacal the Great. He continued the ambitious project of adorning Palenque with fine art and architecture begun by his father; his most important addition to the city of Palenque was the Temple of the Cross which is the center piece of the Temple of the Cross Complex. He was succeeded by his younger brother, K'inich K'an Joy Chitam II
October 20, 713 Ali ibn Husayn Zayn al-Abidin the fourth Shiite Imam, after his father Husayn, his uncle Hasan, and his grandfather Ali, the Prophet’s son-in-law. He survived the Battle of Karbala and was taken along with the enslaved women to the caliph in Damascus. Eventually, however, he was allowed to return to Medina where he led a secluded life with only a few intimate companions. Imam Sajjad's life and statements were entirely devoted to asceticism and religious teachings mostly in the form of invocations and supplications. His famous supplications are well known as Al-Sahifa al-Sajjadiyya
April 20, 767 Taichō a shugendō monk in Nara period Japan. He was raised in Echizen Province, which was in the southern portion of present day Fukui Prefecture. He was the second son of Mikami Yasuzumi. He is said to be the first person to reach the top of Mount Haku in neighboring Kaga Province and other peaks in the Ryōhaku Mountains
August 20, 768 Eadberht of Northumbria king of Northumbria from 737 or 738 to 758. He was the brother of Ecgbert, Archbishop of York. His reign is seen as a return to the imperial ambitions of seventh-century Northumbria and may represent a period of economic prosperity. He faced internal opposition from rival dynasties and at least two actual or potential rivals were killed during his reign. In 758 he abdicated in favour of his son Oswulf and became a monk at York
February 20, 789 Saint Leo of Catania the fifteenth bishop of Catania, famed also for his love and care toward the poor. His feast day occurs on February 20, the day of his death in which he is venerated as a Saint both by Roman Catholics and by the Orthodox Church. He lived in the lapse of time between the reigns of the Emperors Justinian II and Constantine He struggled especially against the paganism and sorcery still prevalent in the Byzantine Sicily
May 20, 794 Æthelberht II of East Anglia an eighth-century saint and a king of East Anglia, the Anglo-Saxon kingdom which today includes the English counties of Norfolk and Suffolk. Little is known of his reign, which may have begun in 779, according to later sources, and very few of the coins issued during his reign have been discovered. It is known from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle that he was killed on the orders of Offa of Mercia in 794
November 20, 811 Li Fan (Tang dynasty) an official of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty, serving as a chancellor during the reign of Emperor Xianzong.
January 20, 820 Al-Shafi‘i Abu ʿAbdillah Muhammad ibn Idris al-Shafi‘i A Muslim jurist, who lived from. Often referred to as 'Shaykh al-Islām' he was one of the four great Imams of which a legacy on juridical matters and teaching eventually led to the Shafi'i school of fiqh named after him. Hence he is often called Imam al-Shafi‘i. :1
June 20, 840 Louis the Pious the King of Aquitaine from 781. He was also King of the Franks and co-Emperor with his father, Charlemagne, from 813
January 20, 842 Theophilos (emperor) the Byzantine Emperor from 829 until his death in 842. He was the second emperor of the Amorian dynasty and the last emperor to support iconoclasm. Theophilos personally led the armies in his lifelong war against the Arabs, beginning in 831
March 20, 842 Alfonso II of Asturias the king of Asturias from 791 to his death, the son of Fruela I and the Basque Munia.
November 20, 842 Gregory of Dekapolis a 9th-century Byzantine monk, notable for his miracle-working and his travels across the Byzantine world. He is known as "the New Miracle-Worker" , and his feast day in the Eastern Orthodox Church is on November 20
March 20, 851 Ebbo archbishop of Rheims from 816 until 835 and again from 840 to 841. He was born a German serf on the royal demesne of Charlemagne. He was educated at his court and became the librarian and councillor of Louis the Pious, king of Aquitaine, son of Charlemagne. When Louis became emperor, he appointed Ebbo to the see of Rheims, then vacant after the death of Wulfaire
December 20, 860 Æthelbald of Wessex the second of the five sons of King Æthelwulf of Wessex and Osburh. He was king of Wessex from 858 to 860
November 20, 869 Edmund the Martyr king of East Anglia from about 855 until his death.
January 20, 882 Louis the Younger the second eldest of the three sons of Louis II the German and Emma. He succeeded his father as the King of Saxony on 28 August 876 and his elder brother Carloman as King of Bavaria from 880 to 882. He died in 882 and was succeeded in all his territories, which encompassed most of East Francia, by his younger brother, Charles the Fat, already King of Italy and Emperor
April 20, 888 Emperor Xizong of Tang an emperor of the Tang dynasty of China. He reigned from 873 to 888. He was the fifth son of his predecessor Emperor Yizong and was the elder brother of his successor Emperor Zhaozong. His reign saw his realm overrun by the great agrarian rebellions led by Wang Xianzhi and Huang Chao, and while both were eventually defeated, by the end of Emperor Xizong's reign, the Tang state had virtually disintegrated into pieces ruled by individual warlords, rather than the imperial government, and would never recover, falling eventually in 907
June 20, 930 Hucbald a Frankish music theorist, composer, teacher, writer, hagiographer, and Benedictine monk. Deeply influenced by Boethius' De Institutione Musica, he wrote the first systematic work on western music theory, aiming at reconciling through many notated examples ancient Greek music theory and the contemporary practice of the more recent so-called 'Gregorian chant'
July 20, 940 Ibn Muqla an Persian official of the Abbasid Caliphate who rose to high state posts in the early 10th century. His career culminated in his own assumption of the vizierate at Baghdad thrice, in 928–930, 932–933 and 934–936. Unable to successfully challenge the growing power of regional emirs, he lost his position to the first amir al-umara, Ibn Ra'iq, and died in prison. He was also a noted calligrapher
May 20, 965 Gero I , called the Great , ruled an initially modest march centred on Merseburg, which he expanded into a vast territory named after him: the marca Geronis. During the mid-10th century, he was the leader of the Saxon Drang nach Osten
August 20, 984 Pope John XIV Pope from December 983 to his death in 984. He was the successor to Pope Benedict VII
November 20, 996 Richard I Duke of Normandy the Duke of Normandy from 942 to 996. Dudo of Saint-Quentin, whom Richard commissioned to write his De moribus et actis primorum Normanniae ducum , called him a dux, but this use of the word may have been in the context of Richard's leadership in war, and not a reference to a title of nobility. Richard either introduced feudalism into Normandy, or he greatly expanded By the end of his reign, most important landholders held their lands in feudal tenure
August 20, 997 Conrad I Duke of Swabia Duke of Swabia from 983 until 997. His appointment as duke marked the return of Conradine rule over Swabia for the first time since 948
November 20, 1008 Geoffrey I Duke of Brittany the eldest son of Duke Conan I of Brittany. He was Count of Rennes , by right of succession. In 992 he assumed the title of Duke of Brittany, which had long been an independent state, but he had little control over much of Lower Brittany
November 20, 1022 Bernward of Hildesheim the thirteenth Bishop of Hildesheim from 993 until his death in 1022.
July 20, 1031 Robert II of France King of the Franks from 996 until his death. The second reigning member of the House of Capet, he was born in Orléans to Hugh Capet and Adelaide of Aquitaine
July 20, 1039 Conrad II Duke of Carinthia the Salian duke of Carinthia from 1035. His parents were Conrad I and Matilda of Swabia. His father died in 1011 when Conrad the Younger was a minor. Adalbero of Eppenstein was given the duchy of Carinthia. Instead Conrad became count in Nahegau, Speyergau, and Wormsgau
February 20, 1054 Yaroslav the Wise thrice Grand Prince of Novgorod and Kiev, uniting the two principalities for a time under his rule. Yaroslav's Christian name was George after Saint George
May 20, 1062 Bao Zheng a government officer during the reign of Emperor Renzong in ancient China's Song Dynasty. During his twenty five years in civil service, Bao consistently demonstrated extreme honesty and uprightness, with actions such as sentencing his own uncle, impeaching an uncle of Emperor Renzong's favourite concubine and punishing powerful families. His appointment from 1057 to 1058 as the prefect of Song's capital Kaifeng, where he initiated a number of changes to better hear the grievances of the people, made him a legendary figure
December 20, 1073 Dominic of Silos dedicated. He is revered as a saint in the Catholic Church. His feast day is December 20
November 20, 1084 Otto II Marquess of Montferrat the Margrave of Montferrat from 1042 until his death. He was a member of the Aleramid dynasty
September 20, 1085 Hermann II Count Palatine of Lotharingia Count Palatine of Lotharingia from 1064 when reaching majority, until 1085. He was count in the Ruhrgau and the Zulpichgau, as well as count of Brabant. He is the son of Henry I of Lotharingia and Mathild of Verdun , daughter of Gozelo I of Lotharingia
April 20, 1089 Demetrius Zvonimir of Croatia King of Croatia from 1075 until his death. He was crowned as king in Solin on 8 October 1076. Zvonimir also ruled as Ban of Slavonia , and was named Duke of Croatia in around 1075. His native name was Zvonimir, while the name Demetrius was adopted at his coronation
January 20, 1095 Wulfstan (died 1095) the last surviving pre-Conquest bishop and the only English-born bishop after 1075. Wulfstan is a Christian saint
August 20, 1097 Albert Azzo II Margrave of Milan a powerful nobleman in the Holy Roman Empire. He is considered the founder of Casa d'Este , having been head of the first family to be master of Este, a town of Padua
July 20, 1109 Eupraxia of Kiev the daughter of Vsevolod I, Prince of Kiev. She married Henry IV of Germany and took the name Adelaide