Born on 22nd day

December 22, 244 Diocletian a Roman emperor from 284 to 305. Born to a family of low status in the Roman province of Dalmatia, Diocletian rose through the ranks of the military to become cavalry commander to the Emperor Carus. After the deaths of Carus and his son Numerian on campaign in Persia, Diocletian was proclaimed emperor. The title was also claimed by Carus' other surviving son, Carinus, but Diocletian defeated him in the Battle of the Margus. Diocletian's reign stabilized the empire and marks the end of the Crisis of the Third Century. He appointed fellow officer Maximian as augustus, co-emperor, in 286
June 22, 662 Emperor Ruizong of Tang the fifth and ninth emperor of Tang Dynasty. He was the eighth son of Emperor Gaozong and the fourth son of Emperor Gaozong's second wife Empress Wu
March 22, 841 Bernard Plantapilosa the Count of Auvergne from 872 to his death. The Emperor Charles the Fat granted him the title of Margrave of Aquitaine in 885
March 22, 875 William I Duke of Aquitaine the Count of Auvergne from 886 and Duke of Aquitaine from 893, succeeding the Poitevin ruler Ebalus Manser. He made numerous monastic foundations, most important among them the foundation of Cluny Abbey on 11 September 910
June 22, 916 Sayf al-Dawla the founder of the Emirate of Aleppo, encompassing most of northern Syria and parts of western Jazira, and the brother of al-Hasan ibn Abdallah ibn Hamdan.
June 22, 1000 Robert I Duke of Normandy the Duke of Normandy from 1027 until his death. Owing to uncertainty over the numbering of the Dukes of Normandy he is usually called Robert I, but sometimes Robert II with his ancestor Rollo as Robert He was the father of William the Conqueror who became in 1066 King of England and founded the House of Normandy
February 22, 1040 Rashi a medieval French rabbi and author of a comprehensive commentary on the Talmud and commentary on the Tanakh. Acclaimed for his ability to present the basic meaning of the text in a concise and lucid fashion, Rashi appeals to both learned scholars and beginning students, and his works remain a centerpiece of contemporary Jewish study. His commentary on the Talmud, which covers nearly all of the Babylonian Talmud , has been included in every edition of the Talmud since its first printing by Daniel Bomberg in the 1520s. His commentary on Tanach — especially on the Chumash — is an indispensable aid to students of all levels. The latter commentary alone serves as the basis for more than 300 "supercommentaries" which analyze Rashi's choice of language and citations, penned by some of the greatest names in rabbinic literature
February 22, 1071 Arnulf III Count of Flanders a.k.a Arnulf 'the unlucky' became Count of Flanders as a minor in 1070 and until his death in 1071.
October 22, 1071 William IX Duke of Aquitaine the Duke of Aquitaine and Gascony and Count of Poitou between 1086 and his death. He was also one of the leaders of the Crusade of 1101. Though his political and military achievements have a certain historical importance, he is best known as the earliest troubadour — a vernacular lyric poet in the Occitan language — whose work survived
December 22, 1091 Jutta von Sponheim currently the Rhineland-Palatinate. She was the daughter of Count Stephen of Spanheim
December 22, 1095 Roger II of Sicily King of Sicily, son of Roger I of Sicily and successor to his brother Simon. He began his rule as Count of Sicily in 1105, became Duke of Apulia and Calabria in 1127, and then King of Sicily in 1130. By the time of his death at the age of 58, Roger had succeeded in uniting all the Norman conquests in Italy into one kingdom with a strong centralized government
May 22, 1124 Wiprecht of Groitzsch the Margrave of Meissen and the Saxon Ostmark from 1123 until his death. He was born to a noble family of the Altmark, the son of Wiprecht of Balsamgau and Sigena of Leinungen. After his father's death in 1060, he was raised at the court of Lothair Udo II, Margrave of the Nordmark, in Stade
July 22, 1136 William FitzEmpress the youngest of the three sons of Geoffrey, Count of Anjou and Empress Matilda, daughter of King Henry I of England.
February 22, 1169 Shirkuh a Kurdish military commander, and uncle of Saladin. His military and diplomatic efforts in Egypt were a key factor in establishing the Ayyubid family in that country
December 22, 1177 Emperor Antoku the 81st emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. His reign spanned the years from 1180 through 1185. During this time, the imperial family was involved in a bitter struggle between warring clans. Yoritomo, with his cousin Yoshinaka, led a force from the Minamoto clan against the Taira, who controlled the emperor. During the sea battle of Dan-no-ura in March 1185, a member of the royal household took Antoku and plunged with him into the water in the Shimonoseki Straits, drowning the child emperor rather than allowing him to be captured by the opposing forces. The conflict between the clans led to numerous legends and tales. Antoku's tomb is said to be located in a number of places around western Japan, including the island of Iwo Jima, a result of the spreading of legends about the emperor and the battle
December 22, 1189 Chagatai Khan the second son of Genghis Khan. He was Khan of the Chagatai Khanate from 1226-1242 C.E. The Chagatai language and Chagatai Turks take their names from him. He inherited most of what are now the five Central Asian states after the death of his father. He was also appointed by Genghis Khan to oversee the execution of the Yassa, the written code of law created by Genghis Khan, though that lasted only until Genghis Khan was crowned Khan of the Mongol Empire. The Empire later came to be known as the Chagatai Khanate, a descendant empire of the Mongol Empire. Chagatai Khan was considered hot-headed and somewhat temperamental by his relatives, because of his attitude of non-acceptance of Jochi as Great Khan. He was the most vocal about this issue among his relations. Chaghatai himself appears to have been a just and energetic governor, though perhaps rough and uncouth, and addicted to hard drinking. At any rate, he was animated by the soldier-like spirit of his father, and succeeded in keeping order among as heterogeneous a population, as a kingdom was ever composed of
October 22, 1197 Emperor Juntoku the 84th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. His reign spanned the years from 1210 through 1221
July 22, 1210 Joan of England Queen of Scotland Queen consort of Scotland from 1221 until her death. She was the third child of John, King of England and Isabella of Angoulême
September 22, 1211 Ibn Khallikan a 13th Century Shafi'i Islamic scholar of Arab or Kurdish origin.
March 22, 1212 Emperor Go-Horikawa the 86th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. This reign spanned the years from 1221 through 1232
January 22, 1263 Ibn Taymiyyah a Sunni Islamic scholar , Sunni Islamic philosopher, Sunni theologian and logician. He lived during the troubled times of the Mongol invasions. He was a member of the school founded by Ahmad ibn Hanbal, and is considered by his followers, along with Ibn Qudamah, as one of the two most significant proponents of Hanbalism; in the modern era, his adherents often refer to the two as "the two sheikhs" and Ibn Taymiyyah in particular as "Sheikh ul-Islam". Ibn Taymiyyah was notable for having sought the return of Sunni Islam to what he viewed as earlier interpretations of the Qur'an and the Sunnah, and is considered to have had considerable influence in contemporary Wahhabism, Salafism, and Jihadism. He is renowned for his fatwa issued against the Mongol rulers declaring jihad by Muslims against them compulsory, on the grounds that they did not follow Sharia and as such were not Muslim, their claims to have converted to Islam notwithstanding. His teachings had a profound influence on the Muhammad ibn Abd al-Wahhab, and other later Sunni scholars
July 22, 1298 John Stewart of Bonkyll a son of Alexander Stewart, 4th High Steward of Scotland. He was a military commander during the First Scottish War of Independence and during the Battle of Falkirk, he commanded the Scottish archers, and was killed during the battle. Stewart is interred in the churchyard of the Falkirk Old Parish Church
December 22, 1300 Khutughtu Khan Emperor Mingzong of Yuan a son of Khayishan who briefly ascended the throne of the Yuan Dynasty in 1329, but died soon after he seized the throne of Great Khan of the Mongols and Emperor of China.
February 22, 1303 Gegeen Khan Emperor Yingzong of Yuan regarded as the ninth Great Khan of the Mongols in Mongolia. His name means "enlightened/bright khan" in the Mongolian language
September 22, 1335 Guglielmo Tocco the governor of the Greek island of Corfu in the 1330s and the founder of the Tocco dynasty.
January 22, 1355 William II Marquis of Namur inherited the Marquisate of Namur from his father William I in 1391 and held it until his own death.
March 22, 1367 Thomas de Mowbray 1st Duke of Norfolk an English peer. As a result of his involvement in the power struggles which led up to the fall of Richard II, he was banished and died in exile in Venice
September 22, 1373 Thomas le Despenser 1st Earl of Gloucester the son of Edward le Despenser, 1st Baron le Despencer, whom he succeeded in 1375.
March 22, 1394 Ulugh Beg a Timurid ruler as well as an astronomer, mathematician and sultan. His commonly known name is not truly a personal name, but rather a moniker, which can be loosely translated as "Great Ruler" or "Patriarch Ruler" and was the Turkic equivalent of Timur's Perso-Arabic title Amīr-e Kabīr. His real name was Mīrzā Mohammad Tāraghay bin Shāhrokh. Ulugh Beg was also notable for his work in astronomy-related mathematics, such as trigonometry and spherical geometry. He built the great Ulugh Beg Observatory in Samarkand between 1424 and 1429. It was considered by scholars to have been one of the finest observatories in the Islamic world at the time and the largest in Central Asia. He built the Ulugh Beg Madrasah in Samarkand and Bukhara, transforming the cities into cultural centers of learning in Central Asia. He was also a mathematics genius of the 15th century — albeit his mental aptitude was perseverance rather than any unusual endowment of intellect. His Observatory is situated in Samarkand which is in Uzbekistan. He ruled Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan, southern Kazakhstan and most of Afghanistan for almost half a century from 1411 to 1449
January 22, 1397 Louis Dauphin of France Duke of Guyenne a younger son of Charles VI of France and Isabeau of Bavaria. He was the third child of his parents to hold the title Dauphin of France, holding it from the death of his older brother in 1401, when he was likewise made Duke of Guyenne
February 22, 1403 Charles VII of France a monarch of the House of Valois who ruled as King of France from 1422 to his death, although his legitimacy was initially contested by Henry VI of England.
August 22, 1412 Frederick II Elector of Saxony Elector of Saxony and was Landgrave of Thuringia.
June 22, 1425 Lucrezia Tornabuoni a daughter of Francesco di Simone Tornabuoni and Nanna di Niccolo di Luigi Guicciardini. Her brother was Giovanni Tornabuoni
November 22, 1428 Richard Neville 16th Earl of Warwick an English nobleman, administrator, and military commander. The son of Richard Neville, 5th Earl of Salisbury, Warwick was the wealthiest and most powerful English peer of his age, with political connections that went beyond the country's borders. One of the Yorkist leaders in the Wars of the Roses, he was instrumental in the deposition of two kings, a fact which later earned him his epithet of "Kingmaker" to later generations
January 22, 1440 Ivan III of Russia a Grand Prince of Moscow and Grand Prince of all Rus. Sometimes referred to as the "gatherer of the Russian lands", he tripled the territory of his state, ended the dominance of the Golden Horde over the Rus, renovated the Moscow Kremlin, and laid the foundations of the Russian state. He was one of the longest-reigning Russian rulers in history
February 22, 1440 Ladislaus the Posthumous Duke of Austria from 1440, King of Hungary from 1444 and King of Bohemia from 1453.
June 22, 1450 Eleanor of Naples Duchess of Ferrara was, by marriage, the first Duchess of Ferrara.
April 22, 1451 Isabella I of Castile queen of Castile and León. She and her husband, Ferdinand II of Aragon, brought stability to the kingdoms that became the basis for the political unification of Spain under their grandson, Holy Roman Emperor Charles After a struggle to claim her right to the throne, she reorganised the governmental system, brought the crime rate to the lowest it had been in years, and unburdened the kingdom of the enormous debt her brother had left behind. Her reforms and those she made with her husband had an influence that extended well beyond the borders of their united kingdoms. Isabella and Ferdinand are known for completing the Reconquista, ordering conversion or exile of their Muslim and Jewish subjects in the Spanish Inquisition, and for supporting and financing Christopher Columbus's 1492 voyage that led to the opening of the New World. Isabella was granted the title Servant of God by the Catholic Church in 1974
February 22, 1455 Johann Reuchlin a German-born humanist and a scholar of Greek and Hebrew, whose work also took him to modern-day France, Austria, Switzerland, Italy. Most of Reuchlin's career was around advancing German knowledge of Greek and Hebrew
March 22, 1459 Maximilian I Holy Roman Emperor King of the Romans from 1486 and Holy Roman Emperor from 1508 until his death, though he was never in fact crowned by the Pope, the journey to Rome always being too risky. He had ruled jointly with his father for the last ten years of his father's reign, from 1483. He expanded the influence of the House of Habsburg through war and his marriage in 1477 to Mary of Burgundy, the heiress to the Duchy of Burgundy, but he also lost the Austrian territories in today's Switzerland to the Swiss Confederacy
December 22, 1459 Sultan Cem a pretender to the Ottoman throne in the 15th century.
May 22, 1466 Marino Sanuto the Younger a Venetian historian.
July 22, 1478 Philip I of Castile the first member of the house of Habsburg to be King of Castile. The son of Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I, at age 3 Philip inherited the greater part of the Duchy of Burgundy and the Burgundian Netherlands from his mother, Mary, and at 27 briefly succeeded to the Crown of Castile as the husband of Queen Joanna, who was also heiress-presumptive to the Crown of Aragon. He was the first Habsburg monarch in Spain. He never inherited his father's territories, nor became Holy Roman Emperor, because he predeceased his father, but his son Emperor Charles V eventually united the Habsburg, Burgundian, Castilian, and Aragonese inheritances
March 22, 1490 Francesco Maria I della Rovere Duke of Urbino an Italian condottiero, who was Duke of Urbino from 1508 to 1516 and 1521 to 1538 when he retook the throne from Lorenzo II de' Medici.
December 22, 1490 Giovanni Tornabuoni an Italian merchant, banker and patron of the arts from Florence.
February 22, 1500 Rodolfo Pio da Carpi an Italian Cardinal, humanist and patron of the arts. He formed a great library and was at the center of humanist studies in 16th-century Rome, though serving on the Roman Inquisition. He was a trusted advisor to Pope Pius III and helped to establish the Inquisition at Milan
March 22, 1503 Antonio Francesco Grazzini an Italian author.
June 22, 1510 Alessandro de' Medici Duke of Florence ruler of Florence from 1530 until 1537. Though illegitimate, he was the last member of the "senior" branch of the Medici to rule Florence and the first to be a hereditary duke
October 22, 1511 Erasmus Reinhold a German astronomer and mathematician, considered to be the most influential astronomical pedagogue of his generation. He was born and died in Saalfeld, Saxony
February 22, 1514 Tahmasp I an influential Shah of Iran, who enjoyed the longest reign of any member of the Safavid dynasty. He was the son and successor of Ismail I