25th day in history

25th day events chronologically

January 25, 41 After a night of negotiation, Claudius is accepted as Roman Emperor by the Senate
February 25, 138 The Roman emperor Hadrian adopts Antoninus Pius, effectively making him his successor
September 25, 275 In Rome, (after the assassination of Aurelian), the Senate proclaims Marcus Claudius Tacitus Emperor
July 25, 285 Diocletian appoints Maximian as Caesar, co-ruler
July 25, 306 Constantine I is proclaimed Roman emperor by his troops
July 25, 315 The Arch of Constantine is completed near the Colosseum in Rome to commemorate Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Milvian Bridge
December 25, 333 Roman Emperor Constantine the Great elevates his youngest son Constans to the rank of Caesar

Top 7 most famous people born on 25th day

April 25, 1599 Oliver Cromwell an English military and political leader and later Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland.
June 25, 1852 Antoni Gaudí a Spanish Catalan architect from Reus and the best known practitioner of Catalan Modernism. Gaudí's works reflect an individualized and distinctive style. Most are located in Barcelona, including his magnum opus, the Sagrada Família
October 25, 1881 Pablo Picasso a Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, stage designer, poet and playwright who spent most of his adult life in France. As one of the greatest and most influential artists of the 20th century, he is known for co-founding the Cubist movement, the invention of constructed sculpture, the co-invention of collage, and for the wide variety of styles that he helped develop and explore. Among his most famous works are the proto-Cubist Les Demoiselles d'Avignon , and Guernica , a portrayal of the Bombing of Guernica by the German and Italian airforces at the behest of the Spanish nationalist government during the Spanish Civil War
June 25, 1903 George Orwell an English novelist, essayist, journalist and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice, opposition to totalitarianism, and commitment to democratic socialism
February 25, 1943 George Harrison an English musician, multi-instrumentalist, singer and songwriter who achieved international fame as the lead guitarist of the Beatles. Although John Lennon and Paul McCartney were the band's primary songwriters, most of their albums included at least one Harrison composition, including "While My Guitar Gently Weeps", "Here Comes the Sun" and "Something", which became the Beatles' second-most-covered song
March 25, 1947 Elton John an English singer, songwriter, composer, pianist, record producer, and occasional actor. He has worked with lyricist Bernie Taupin as his songwriter partner since 1967; they have collaborated on more than 30 albums to date
October 25, 1984 Katy Perry an American singer, songwriter, and actress. She had limited exposure to secular music during her childhood and pursued a career in gospel music as a teenager. After releasing her debut studio album, Katy Hudson, in 2001, Perry moved to Los Angeles the following year to venture into secular music. She recorded a collaborative album with the Matrix, which was released in 2009. Perry also recorded an album with Glen Ballard that was not released due to contractual complications

Top 7 most famous people died on 25th day

August 25, 1867 Michael Faraday an English scientist who contributed to the fields of electromagnetism and electrochemistry. His main discoveries include those of electromagnetic induction, diamagnetism and electrolysis
August 25, 1900 Friedrich Nietzsche a German philologist, philosopher, cultural critic, poet and composer. He wrote several critical texts on religion, morality, contemporary culture, philosophy and science, displaying a fondness for metaphor, irony and aphorism
December 25, 1963 Tristan Tzara a Romanian and French avant-garde poet, essayist and performance artist. Also active as a journalist, playwright, literary and art critic, composer and film director, he was known best for being one of the founders and central figures of the anti-establishment Dada movement. Under the influence of Adrian Maniu, the adolescent Tzara became interested in Symbolism and co-founded the magazine Simbolul with Ion Vinea and painter Marcel Janco. During World War I, after briefly collaborating on Vinea's Chemarea, he joined Janco in Switzerland. There, Tzara's shows at the Cabaret Voltaire and Zunfthaus zur Waag, as well as his poetry and art manifestos, became a main feature of early Dadaism. His work represented Dada's nihilistic side, in contrast with the more moderate approach favored by Hugo Ball
December 25, 1977 Charlie Chaplin an English actor, comedian, and filmmaker who rose to fame in the silent era. Chaplin became a worldwide icon through his screen persona "the Tramp" and is considered one of the most important figures in the history of the film industry. His career spanned more than 75 years, from childhood in the Victorian era until a year before his death at age 88, and encompassed both adulation and controversy
June 25, 2009 Michael Jackson an American singer, songwriter, dancer, and actor. Called the King of Pop, his contributions to music and dance, along with his publicized personal life, made him a global figure in popular culture for over four decades
August 25, 2009 Ted Kennedy the senior United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic Party. He was the second most senior member of the Senate when he died and was the fourth-longest-serving senator in United States history, having served there for almost 47 years. As the most prominent living member of the Kennedy family for many years, he was also the last surviving son of Joseph Kennedy, and Rose Kennedy; the youngest brother of President John Kennedy and Senator Robert Kennedy, both victims of assassination; and the father of Congressman Patrick Kennedy
August 25, 2012 Neil Armstrong an American astronaut and the first person to walk on the Moon. He was also an aerospace engineer, naval aviator, test pilot, and university professor. Before becoming an astronaut, Armstrong was an officer in the U.S. Navy and served in the Korean War. After the war, he earned his bachelor's degree at Purdue University and served as a test pilot at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics High-Speed Flight Station, now known as the Dryden Flight Research Center, where he logged over 900 flights. He later completed graduate studies at the University of Southern California