3rd day in history

3rd day events chronologically

August 3, 8 Roman Empire general Tiberius defeats the Dalmatae on the river Bathinus
September 3, 301 San Marino, one of the smallest nations in the world and the world's oldest republic still in existence, is founded by Saint Marinus
July 3, 324 Battle of Adrianople: Constantine I defeats Licinius, who flees to Byzantium
June 3, 350 The Roman usurper Nepotianus, of the Constantinian dynasty, proclaims himself Roman Emperor, entering Rome at the head of a group of gladiators
November 3, 361 Emperor Constantius II dies of a fever at Mopsuestia in Cilicia, on his deathbed he is baptised and declares his cousin Julian rightful successor
October 3, 382 Roman Emperor Theodosius I concludes a peace treaty with the Goths and settles them in the Balkans in exchange for military service
August 3, 435 Deposed Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople Nestorius, considered the originator of Nestorianism, is exiled by Roman Emperor Theodosius II to a monastery in Egypt

Top 7 most famous people born on 3rd day

May 3, 1469 Niccolò Machiavelli an Italian historian, politician, diplomat, philosopher, humanist, and writer based in Florence during the Renaissance. He was for many years an official in the Florentine Republic, with responsibilities in diplomatic and military affairs. He was a founder of modern political science, and more specifically political ethics. He also wrote comedies, carnival songs, and poetry. His personal correspondence is renowned in the Italian language. He was Secretary to the Second Chancery of the Republic of Florence from 1498 to 1512, when the Medici were out of power. He wrote his masterpiece, The Prince, after the Medici had recovered power and he no longer held a position of responsibility in Florence
March 3, 1847 Alexander Graham Bell credited with inventing the first practical telephone.
July 3, 1883 Franz Kafka a German-language writer of novels and short stories, regarded by critics as one of the most influential authors of the 20th century. Most of his works, such as "Die Verwandlung" , Der Prozess , and Das Schloss , are filled with the themes and archetypes of alienation, physical and psychological brutality, parent–child conflict, characters on a terrifying quest, labyrinths of bureaucracy, and mystical transformations
January 3, 1892 J. R. R. Tolkien an English writer, poet, philologist, and university professor, best known as the author of the classic high fantasy works The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion.
April 3, 1924 Marlon Brando an American actor and one-time director. He is hailed for bringing a gripping realism to film acting, and is widely considered to be one of the greatest and most influential actors of all time. A cultural icon, Brando is most famous for his Oscar-winning performances as Terry Malloy in On the Waterfront and Vito Corleone in The Godfather , as well as influential performances in A Streetcar Named Desire , Viva Zapata! , Julius Caesar , The Wild One , Reflections in a Golden Eye , Last Tango in Paris and Apocalypse Now. Brando was also an activist, supporting many causes, notably the African-American Civil Rights Movement and various American Indian Movements
January 3, 1969 Michael Schumacher a German retired racing driver. Schumacher is a seven-time Formula One World Champion and is widely regarded as one of the greatest F1 drivers of all time. He was named Laureus World Sportsman of the Year twice. He holds many of Formula One's driver records, including most championships, race victories, fastest laps, pole positions and most races won in a single season – 13 in 2004. In 2002, he became the only driver in Formula One history to finish in the top three in every race of a season and then also broke the record for most consecutive podium finishes. According to the official Formula One website, he is "statistically the greatest driver the sport has ever seen"
June 3, 1986 Rafael Nadal a Spanish professional tennis player currently ranked world 3. He is widely regarded as the finest clay court player in history and has been nicknamed "The King of Clay." His evolution into an all-court threat has established him as one of the best ever all-rounders in tennis, with some considering Nadal to be the greatest player of all time

Top 7 most famous people died on 3rd day

September 3, 1658 Oliver Cromwell an English military and political leader and later Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland.
October 3, 1896 William Morris an English textile designer, poet, novelist, translator, and socialist activist. Associated with the British Arts and Crafts Movement, he was a major contributor to the revival of traditional British textile arts and methods of production. His literary contributions helped to establish the modern fantasy genre, while he played a significant role in propagating the early socialist movement in Britain
February 3, 1924 Woodrow Wilson the 28th President of the United States from 1913 to 1921 and leader of the Progressive Movement. He served as President of Princeton University from 1902 to 1910 and was Governor of New Jersey from 1911 to 1913. He led his Democratic Party to win control of both the White House and Congress in 1912
June 3, 1924 Franz Kafka a German-language writer of novels and short stories, regarded by critics as one of the most influential authors of the 20th century. Most of his works, such as "Die Verwandlung" , Der Prozess , and Das Schloss , are filled with the themes and archetypes of alienation, physical and psychological brutality, parent–child conflict, characters on a terrifying quest, labyrinths of bureaucracy, and mystical transformations
November 3, 1957 Wilhelm Reich an Austrian psychoanalyst, a member of the second generation of psychoanalysts after Sigmund Freud, and one of the most radical figures in the history of psychiatry. He was the author of several influential books, most notably Character Analysis and The Mass Psychology of Fascism. His work on character contributed to the development of Anna Freud's The Ego and the Mechanisms of Defence , and his idea of muscular armour – the expression of the personality in the way the body moves – shaped innovations such as body psychotherapy, Fritz Perls's Gestalt therapy, Alexander Lowen's bioenergetic analysis, and Arthur Janov's primal therapy. His writing influenced generations of intellectuals: during the 1968 student uprisings in Paris and Berlin, students scrawled his name on walls and threw copies of The Mass Psychology of Fascism at the police
November 3, 1982 E. H. Carr an English historian, diplomat, journalist and international relations theorist, and an opponent of empiricism within historiography. Carr was best known for his 14-volume history of the Soviet Union, in which he provided an account of Soviet history from 1917 to 1929, for his writings on international relations, particularly The Twenty Years' Crisis, and for his book What Is History?, in which he laid out historiographical principles rejecting traditional historical methods and practices
August 3, 2008 Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn a Russian novelist, historian, and critic of Soviet totalitarianism. He helped to raise global awareness of the gulag and the Soviet Union's forced labor camp system. While his writings were long suppressed in the USSR, he wrote many books, most notably The Gulag Archipelago, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, August 1914 and Cancer Ward. Solzhenitsyn was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1970, "for the ethical force with which he has pursued the indispensable traditions of Russian literature". He was expelled from the Soviet Union in 1974 but returned to Russia in 1994 after the dissolution of the Soviet Union