Died on 6th day

November 6, 16 Agrippina the Younger a Roman Empress and one of the more prominent women in the Julio-Claudian dynasty. She was a great-granddaughter of the Emperor Augustus, great-niece and adoptive granddaughter of the Emperor Tiberius, sister of the Emperor Caligula, niece and fourth wife of the Emperor Claudius, and mother of the Emperor Nero
October 6, 23 Wang Mang a Han Dynasty official who seized the throne from the Liu family and founded the Xin Dynasty , ruling AD 9–23. The Han dynasty was restored after his overthrow and his rule marks the separation between the Western Han Dynasty and Eastern Han Dynasty. Some historians have traditionally viewed Wang as a usurper, while others have portrayed him as a visionary and selfless social reformer. Though a learned Confucian scholar who sought to implement the harmonious society he saw in the classics, his efforts ended in chaos
August 6, 258 Pope Sixtus II the Pope or Bishop of Rome from 31 August 257 to his death in 258. He was martyred during the persecution by Emperor Valerian
December 6, 343 Saint Nicholas a historic 4th-century Christian saint and Greek Bishop of Myra in Lycia. Because of the many miracles attributed to his intercession, he is also known as Nikolaos the Wonderworker. He had a reputation for secret gift-giving, such as putting coins in the shoes of those who left them out for him, and thus became the model for Santa Claus, whose modern name comes from the Dutch Sinterklaas, itself from a series of elisions and corruptions of the transliteration of "Saint Nikolaos". His reputation evolved among the faithful, as was common for early Christian saints. In 1087, part of the relics were furtively translated to Bari, in Apulia, Italy; for this reason, he is also known as Nikolaos of Bari. The remaining bones were taken to Venice in 1100. His feast day is 6 December
September 6, 394 Eugenius a usurper in the Western Roman Empire against Emperor Theodosius Though himself a Christian, he was the last Emperor to support Roman polytheism.
October 6, 404 Aelia Eudoxia the Empress consort of the Byzantine Emperor Arcadius.
January 6, 429 Honoratus an early Archbishop of Arles, who was also the Abbot of Lérins Abbey. He is honored as a saint in the Catholic Church
August 6, 523 Pope Hormisdas Pope from 20 July 514 to his death in 523. His papacy was dominated by the Acacian schism, started in 484 by Acacius of Constantinople's efforts to placate the Monophysites. His efforts to resolve this schism were successful, and on 28 March 519, the reunion between Constantinople and Rome was ratified in the cathedral of Constantinople before a large crowd
July 6, 649 Goar of Aquitaine a priest and hermit of the seventh century. He was offered the position of Bishop of Trier, but died before accepting the position. He is noted for his piety, and is revered as a miracle-worker. He is a patron saint of innkeepers, potters, and vine growers
June 6, 696 Claudius of Besançon a priest, monk, abbot, and bishop. A native of Franche-Comté, Claudius became a priest at Besançon and later a monk. Georges Goyau in the Catholic Encyclopedia wrote that “The Life of Claudius, Abbot of Condat, has been the subject of much controversy.” Anglican Henry Wace has written that "on this saint the inventors of legends have compiled a vast farrago of improbabilities."
December 6, 735 Prince Toneri a Japanese imperial prince in the Nara period. He was a son of Emperor Temmu. He was given the posthumous name, Emperor Sudoujinkei , as the father of Emperor Junnin. In the beginning of the Nara period, he gained political power as a leader of imperial family together with Prince Nagaya. He supervised the compilation of the Nihonshoki
February 6, 743 Hisham ibn Abd al-Malik 10th Umayyad caliph who ruled from 724 until his death in 743. When he was born in 691 his mother named him after her father
August 6, 750 Marwan II an Umayyad caliph who ruled from 744 until 750 when he was killed. He was the last Umayyad ruler to rule from Damascus
March 6, 757 Baldred of Tyninghame a Northumbrian hermit and abbot, resident in East Lothian during the 8th century.
January 6, 786 Abo of Tiflis a Christian martyr and the Patron Saint of the city of Tbilisi, Georgia.
February 6, 797 Donnchad Midi High King of Ireland. His father, Domnall Midi, had been the first Uí Néill High King from the south-central Clann Cholmáin based in modern County Westmeath and western County Meath, Ireland. The reigns of Domnall and his successor, Niall Frossach of the Cenél nEógain, had been relatively peaceful, but Donnchad's rule saw a return to a more expansionist policy directed against Leinster, traditional target of the Uí Néill, and also, for the first time, the great southern kingdom of Munster
May 6, 850 Emperor Ninmyō the 54th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. Ninmyō's reign lasted from 833 to 850
October 6, 869 Ermentrude of Orléans Queen of the Franks by her marriage to Charles the Bald, Holy Roman Emperor and King of West Francia. She was the daughter of Odo, Count of Orléans and his wife Engeltrude
October 6, 877 Charles the Bald the King of West Francia , King of Italy and Holy Roman Emperor. After a series of civil wars that began during the reign of his father, Louis the Pious, Charles succeeded by the Treaty of Verdun in acquiring the western third of the Carolingian Empire. He was a grandson of Charlemagne and the youngest son of Louis the Pious by his second wife, Judith
January 6, 884 Hasan ibn Zayd an Alid who became the founder of the Zaydid dynasty of Tabaristan.
February 6, 893 Photios I of Constantinople recognized in the Eastern Orthodox churches as Photios the Great.
April 6, 912 Notker the Stammerer a musician, author, poet, and Benedictine monk at the Abbey of Saint Gall in modern Switzerland. He is commonly accepted to be the "Monk of Saint Gall" who wrote De Carolo Magno, a book of anecdotes about the Emperor Charlemagne
June 6, 913 Alexander (Byzantine emperor) sometimes numbered Alexander III, ruled as Emperor of the Byzantine Empire in 912–913. He was the third son of Emperor Basil I and Eudokia Ingerina. Unlike his older brother Leo VI the Wise, his paternity was not disputed between Basil I and Michael III because he was born years after the death of Michael
July 6, 918 William I Duke of Aquitaine the Count of Auvergne from 886 and Duke of Aquitaine from 893, succeeding the Poitevin ruler Ebalus Manser. He made numerous monastic foundations, most important among them the foundation of Cluny Abbey on 11 September 910
September 6, 926 Emperor Taizu of Liao the first emperor of the Liao Dynasty. His given name was Abaoji , and he also took the Chinese name Some sources also suggest that the surname Yelü was adopted during his lifetime, though there is no unanimity on this point
September 6, 957 Liudolf Duke of Swabia the duke of Swabia from 950 until 954. He was the only son of Otto I, king of Germany, by his wife Eadgyth, daughter of Edward the Elder, king of England
September 6, 972 Pope John XIII Pope from 1 October 965 to his death in 972. His pontificate was caught up in the continuing conflict between the Emperor, Otto I, and the Roman nobility
May 6, 988 Dirk II Count of Holland Count in Frisia and Holland. He was the son of Count Dirk I and Geva
December 6, 1003 Pope John XVII Pope for about seven months from 16 May to December 1003. He was born John Sicco, the son of another John Sicco, in the region of Rome then referred to as Biveretica. He succeeded Pope Silvester II
October 6, 1014 Samuel of Bulgaria the Tsar of the First Bulgarian Empire from 997 to 6 October 1014. From 977 to 997, he was a general under Roman I of Bulgaria, the second surviving son of Emperor Peter I of Bulgaria, and co-ruled with him, as Roman bestowed upon him the command of the army and the effective royal authority. As Samuel struggled to preserve his country's independence from the Byzantine Empire, his rule was characterized by constant warfare against the Byzantines and their equally ambitious ruler Basil II
July 6, 1017 Genshin the most influential of a number of Tendai scholars active during the tenth and eleventh centuries in Japan. He was not a wandering evangelist as Kūya was, but was an elite cleric who espoused a doctrine of devotion to Amida Buddha which taught that because Japan was thought to have entered mappō, the "degenerate age" of the "latter law," the only hope for salvation lay in the reliance on the power of Amitabha. Other doctrines, he claimed, could not aid an individual because they depended on "self-power" , which cannot prevail during the chaos of the degenerate age, when the power of another is necessary. In his approach to rebirth in the Pure Land, Genshin emphasized visual meditation practices, where later Pure Land sects favored verbal recitations such as the nembutsu. Genshin's doctrine is documented in his magnum opus, the Ōjōyōshū , which in later copies of the text came complete with graphic depictions of the joy of the blessed and the suffering of those doomed to chaos
October 6, 1019 Frederick of Luxembourg a son of count Siegfried of Luxembourg and Hedwig of Nordgau.
August 6, 1027 Richard III Duke of Normandy the eldest son of Richard II who died in 1026. Richard's short reign lasted less than a year. It opened with a revolt by his brother and finished in his death by unknown causes
September 6, 1032 Rudolph III of Burgundy the last king of an independent Kingdom of Arles, also called the Second Kingdom of Burgundy. He was the son of King Conrad of Burgundy and Queen Matilda of France. He was the last male member of the Burgundian group of the Elder Welfs family
March 6, 1040 Alhazen an Arab, Muslim, scientist, polymath, mathematician, astronomer and philosopher who made significant contributions to the principles of optics, astronomy, mathematics, meteorology, visual perception and the scientific method.
March 6, 1052 Emma of Normandy a queen consort of England, Denmark and Norway. She was the daughter of Richard I, Duke of Normandy, and his second wife, Gunnora. Through her marriages to Æthelred the Unready and Cnut the Great , she became the Queen Consort of England, Denmark, and Norway. She was the mother of three sons, Edward the Confessor, Alfred, and Harthacnut, as well as two daughters, Goda of England, and Gunhilda of Denmark. Even after her husbands' deaths Emma remained in the public eye, and continued to participate actively in politics. As Anne Duggan notes, Emma is the "first of the early medieval queens" portrayed visually and she is the central figure within the Encomium Emmae Reginae, a critical source for the history of early 11th-century English politics
May 6, 1052 Boniface III Margrave of Tuscany the most powerful north Italian prince of his age. By inheritance he was Count of Brescia, Canossa, Ferrara, Florence, Lucca, Mantua, Modena, Pisa, Pistoia, Parma, Reggio, and Verona from 1007 and, by appointment, Margrave of Tuscany from 1027 until his assassination in 1052. He was the son of the Margrave Tedald and Willa of Bologna. The Lombard family's ancestral castle was Canossa and they had held Modena for several generations. They possessed a great many allodial titles and their power lay chiefly in Emilia
December 6, 1060 Andrew I of Hungary King of Hungary from 1046 to 1060. He descended from a younger branch of the Árpád dynasty. After spending fifteen years in exile, he ascended the throne during an extensive revolt of the pagan Hungarians. He strengthened the position of Christianity in the Kingdom of Hungary and successfully defended its independence against the Holy Roman Empire
October 6, 1072 Sancho II of León and Castile King of Castile , Galicia and León.
November 6, 1078 Berthold II Duke of Carinthia an ancestor of the House of Baden, in addition to being Duke of Carinthia and Margrave of Verona.
December 6, 1082 Ramon Berenguer II Count of Barcelona Count of Barcelona from 1076 until his death. He ruled jointly with his twin brother, Berenguer Ramon The Chronicle of San Juan de la Pena called him, "... exceeding brave and bold, kind, pleasant, pious, joyful, generous, and of an attractive appearance. Because of the extremely thick hair he had on top of his head, he was known as Cap d'Estop."
January 6, 1088 Berengar of Tours a French 11th century Christian theologian and Archdeacon of Angers, a scholar whose leadership of the cathedral school at Chartres set an example of intellectual inquiry through the revived tools of dialectic that was soon followed at cathedral schools of Laon and Paris, and who disputed with the Church leadership over the doctrine of transubstantiation in the Eucharist.
June 6, 1097 Agnes of Aquitaine Queen of Aragon and Navarre sometimes confused.
October 6, 1101 Bruno of Cologne the founder of the Carthusian Order, personally founded the order's first two communities. He was a celebrated teacher at Reims, and a close advisor of his former pupil, Pope Urban II
November 6, 1101 Welf I Duke of Bavaria Duke of Bavaria from 1070 to 1077 and from 1096 to his death. He was the first member of the Welf branch of the House of Este. In the genealogy of the Elder House of Welf he is counted as Welf IV
August 6, 1118 Al-Mustazhir the Abbasid caliph in Baghdad from 1094 to 1118. He succeeded his father al-Muqtadi. During his twenty-four year incumbency he was politically irrelevant, despite the civil strife at home and the appearance of the First Crusade in Syria. An attempt was even made by crusader Raymond IV of Toulouse to attack Baghdad, but he was defeated near Tokat. The global Muslim population had climbed to about 5 per cent as against the Christian population of 11 per cent by 1100
August 6, 1119 Waleran Duke of Lower Lorraine the Duke of Limburg and Count of Arlon from his father's death in about 1119 until his own twenty years later. He was given the Duchy of Lower Lorraine by Lothair of Supplinburg in 1128 after the latter's accession as King of Germany in 1125
June 6, 1134 Norbert of Xanten venerated as a saint.
March 6, 1137 Olegarius the Bishop of Barcelona from 1116 and Archbishop of Tarragona from 1118 until his death. He was an intimate of Ramon Berenguer III, Count of Barcelona, and often accompanied the count on military ventures
June 6, 1138 Ar-Rashid (12th century) the Abbasid caliph in Baghdad from 1135 to 1136.