Born on 8th day

November 8, 30 Nerva Roman Emperor from 96 to 98. Nerva became Emperor at the age of sixty-five, after a lifetime of imperial service under Nero and the rulers of the Flavian dynasty. Under Nero, he was a member of the imperial entourage and played a vital part in exposing the Pisonian conspiracy of 65. Later, as a loyalist to the Flavians, he attained consulships in 71 and 90 during the reigns of Vespasian and Domitian respectively
December 8, 65 Horace the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus. The rhetorician Quintillian regarded his Odes as just about the only Latin lyrics worth reading: "He can be lofty sometimes, yet he is also full of charm and grace, versatile in his figures, and felicitously daring in his choice of words."
February 8, 120 Vettius Valens a 2nd-century Hellenistic astrologer, a somewhat younger contemporary of Claudius Ptolemy.
September 8, 394 Arbogast (general) a Frankish general in the Roman Empire. It has been stated by some ancient historians that he was the son of Flavius Bauto, Valentinian II's former magister militum and protector before Arbogast, but modern scholars largely discount this claim
February 8, 412 Proclus a Greek Neoplatonist philosopher, one of the last major Classical philosophers. He set forth one of the most elaborate and fully developed systems of Neoplatonism. He stands near the end of the classical development of philosophy, and was very influential on Western medieval philosophy as well as Islamic thought
January 8, 454 John the Silent a Christian saint known for living alone for seventy-six years. He was given the surname because he loved recollection and silence. John's feast day is May 13 in the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic Church, and December 3 in the Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches
September 8, 685 Emperor Xuanzong of Tang the seventh emperor of the Tang dynasty in China, reigning from 712 to 756. His reign of 43 years was the longest during the Tang Dynasty. In the early half of his reign he was a diligent and astute ruler, ably assisted by capable chancellors like Yao Chong and Song Jing, and was credited with bringing Tang China to a pinnacle of culture and power
February 8, 785 Emperor Saga the 52nd emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. Saga's reign spanned the years from 809 through 823
September 8, 801 Ansgar an Archbishop of Hamburg-Bremen. The see of Hamburg was designated a mission to bring Christianity to Northern Europe, and Ansgar became known as the "Apostle of the North"
September 8, 829 Ali al-Hadi the tenth of the Twelve Imams. His full name is ‘Alī ibn Muhammad ibn ‘Alī. The exact date of his birth and death are unknown, but it is generally accepted that he was born between 827–830 CE and he died in 868 CE
June 8, 862 Emperor Xizong of Tang an emperor of the Tang dynasty of China. He reigned from 873 to 888. He was the fifth son of his predecessor Emperor Yizong and was the elder brother of his successor Emperor Zhaozong. His reign saw his realm overrun by the great agrarian rebellions led by Wang Xianzhi and Huang Chao, and while both were eventually defeated, by the end of Emperor Xizong's reign, the Tang state had virtually disintegrated into pieces ruled by individual warlords, rather than the imperial government, and would never recover, falling eventually in 907
April 8, 894 Adalelm Count of Troyes the Count of Troyes from 886 to his death. He was a son of Emenon, Count of Poitou, and a Robertian
April 8, 956 Gilbert Duke of Burgundy count of Chalon, Autun, Troyes, Avallon and Dijon, and duke of Burgundy between 952 and 956. He ruled Burgundy jure uxoris, his wife Ermengarde being of the family of Richard the Justiciar. By her he had two daughters: Adelais and Liutgarde. Gilbert never managed to maintain the independence of the duchy in the struggles for power of 10th century France. In 955, he became a vassal of Hugh the Great, count of Paris and married his oldest daughter, Lieutgard, to Hugh's son Otto of Paris
March 8, 1015 Anawrahta the founder of the Pagan Empire. Considered the father of the Burmese nation, Anawrahta turned a small principality in the dry zone of Upper Burma into the first Burmese Empire that formed the basis of modern-day Burma. Historically verifiable Burmese history begins with his accession to the Pagan throne in 1044
December 8, 1021 Wang Anshi a Chinese economist, statesman, chancellor and poet of the Song Dynasty who attempted controversial, major socioeconomic reforms. These reforms constituted the core concepts and motives of the Reformists, while their nemesis, Chancellor Sima Guang, led the Conservative faction against them
January 8, 1037 Su Shi a Chinese writer, poet, painter, calligrapher, pharmacologist, gastronome, and a statesman of the Song dynasty. A major personality of the Song era, Su was an important figure in Song Dynasty politics, aligning himself with Sima Guang and others, against the New Policy party lead by Wang Anshi. Su Shi was famed as an essayist, and his prose writings lucidly contribute to the understanding of topics such as 11th-century Chinese travel literature or detailed information on the contemporary Chinese iron industry. His poetry has a long history of popularity and influence in China, Japan, and other areas in the near vicinity and is well known in the English speaking parts of the world through the translations by Arthur Waley, among others. In terms of the arts, Su Shi has some claim to being "the pre-eminent personality of the eleventh century." He is credited with creating dongpo pork, a prominent dish in Hangzhou cuisine
November 8, 1050 Sviatopolk II of Kiev supreme ruler of the Kievan Rus for 20 years, from 1093 to 1113. He was not a popular prince, and his reign was marked by incessant rivalry with his cousin Vladimir Monomakh. Upon his death the Kievan citizens raised a rebellion against the Jewish merchants and Varangian officials who speculated in grain and salt
October 8, 1060 Hugh V of Lusignan the fifth Lord of Lusignan and Lord of Couhé. He succeeded his father, Hugh IV, sometime around 1026
August 8, 1078 Emperor Horikawa the 73rd emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.
March 8, 1147 Jordan of Santa Susanna a Carthusian monk, created Cardinal Deacon by Pope Lucius II in December 1144 and then Cardinal Priest of Santa Susanna by Eugene III on 21 December 1145. He is often referred to as a member of the Roman family of the Orsini, but more recent research concludes that he was probably a Frenchman. He served as Camerlengo of the Holy Roman Church under Eugene III and subscribed the papal bulls between 9 January 1145 and 11 June 1154
September 8, 1157 Richard I of England King of England from 6 July 1189 until his death. He also ruled as Duke of Normandy , Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Lord of Cyprus, Count of Poitiers, Count of Anjou, Count of Maine, Count of Nantes, and Overlord of Brittany at various times during the same period. He was the third of five sons of King Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. He was known as Richard Cœur de Lion or Richard the Lionheart because of his reputation as a great military leader and warrior. The Muslims called him Melek-Ric or Malek al-Inkitar. He was also known in Occitan as Oc e No , because of his reputation for terseness
September 8, 1157 Alexander Neckam an English scholar, teacher, theologian and abbot of Cirencester from 1213 to his death in 1217.
October 8, 1170 Vladimir III Igorevich a Rus' prince. He was the son of Igor Svyatoslavich and was with him during his campaign against the Cumans on 13 April 1185, immortalized in the epic The Tale of Igor's Campaign; he participated in the first battle, wherein he set off ahead of the main group along with Svyatoslav Olgovich of Rylsk and defeated the Cuman forces. However, he was captured in the second battle by Khans Gzak and Konchak. The Tale of Igor’s Campaign describes how, after Igor escaped from captivity, Gzak and Konchak debated whether to kill Vladimir or entice him into marrying a Cuman maiden:
February 8, 1191 Yaroslav II of Vladimir the Grand Prince of Vladimir who helped to restore his country and capital after the Mongol invasion of Russia.
September 8, 1209 Sancho II of Portugal King of Portugal from 1223 to 1247. He was succeeded by his brother, King Afonso III, in 1247
April 8, 1250 John Tristan Count of Valois a French prince of the Capetian dynasty. He was jure uxoris Count of Nevers from 1265 to 1270, Count of Auxerre and Tonnerre and also Count of Valois and Crépy
September 8, 1271 Charles Martel of Anjou the eldest son of king Charles II of Naples and Maria of Hungary, the daughter of King Stephen V of Hungary.
July 8, 1273 Anno von Sangershausen served as the Grand Master of the Teutonic Order from 1256 to 1273.
May 8, 1278 Emperor Duanzong of Song the eighth and penultimate emperor of the Southern Song Dynasty of China who reigned from 1276 to 1278 and died at the early age of ten. He was also known as the "Nation Establishing Duke ". Born Zhào Shì , his father was sixth Southern Song Emperor Duzong. He became Prince Ji in 1274 and Prince Yi in 1276. Enthroned as emperor at Fuzhou on 14 June 1276, his only era took the name of Jǐngyán. Duanzong's temple name means "Final Ancestor"
March 8, 1286 John III Duke of Brittany duke of Brittany, from 1312 to his death and 5th Earl of Richmond from 1334 to his death. He was the son of Duke Arthur II and Mary of Limoges, his first wife. John was strongly opposed to his father's second marriage to Yolande of Dreux, Queen of Scotland and attempted to contest its legality
February 8, 1291 Afonso IV of Portugal King of Portugal and the Algarves from 1325 until his death. He was the only legitimate son of King Denis of Portugal by his wife Elizabeth of Aragon
March 8, 1293 Beatrice of Castile (1293–1359) Queen of Portugal by marriage and Infanta of Castile-León by birth. She was the wife of King Afonso IV of Portugal, and the youngest daughter of King Sancho IV of Castile and his Queen, María de Molina
April 8, 1320 Peter I of Portugal King of Portugal and the Algarve from 1357 until his death. He was the third but only surviving son of Afonso IV of Portugal and his wife, princess Beatrice of Castile
May 8, 1326 Joan I Countess of Auvergne the daughter of William XII, Count of Auvergne and Boulogne, by his wife, Margaret, a sister of Philip III of Navarre. She was Queen of France by her marriage to King John She inherited the counties of Auvergne and Boulogne after the death of her father
November 8, 1342 Julian of Norwich regarded as one of the most important Christian mystics. She is venerated in the Anglican and Lutheran churches, but has never been canonised or beatified. Written around 1395, her work, Revelations of Divine Love, is the first book in the English language known to have been written by a woman
November 8, 1344 Robert Duke of Bar Marquis of Pont-à-Mousson and Count and then Duke of Bar. He succeeded his elder brother Edward II of Bar as count in 1352, and the county was promoted to a duchy in 1354. Their parents were Henry IV of Bar and Yolande, granddaughter of Robert III, Count of Flanders
August 8, 1356 Giovanni Gradenigo the fifty-sixth Doge of Venice, appointed on April 21, 1355. During his reign, Venice signed a peace with Genoa
January 8, 1360 Ulrich von Jungingen the 26th Grand Master of the Teutonic Knights, serving from 1407 to 1410. His policy of confrontation with the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and the Kingdom of Poland would spark the Polish–Lithuanian–Teutonic War and lead to disaster for his Order, and his own death, at the Battle of Grunwald
September 8, 1380 Bernardino of Siena a Catholic saint. He is known in the Roman Catholic Church as “the Apostle of Italy” for his efforts to revive the country's Catholic faith during the 15th century. His preaching was frequently directed against gambling, witchcraft, sodomy and usury - particularly as practiced by Jews
September 8, 1380 Alexander Peresvet a Russian Orthodox Christian monk who fought in a single combat with the Tatar champion Temir-murza at the opening of the Battle of Kulikovo , where they killed each other.
February 8, 1405 Constantine XI Palaiologos the last reigning Byzantine Emperor, reigning as a member of the Palaiologos dynasty from 1449 to his death in battle at the fall of Constantinople. Following his death, he became a legendary figure in Greek folklore as the "Marble Emperor" who would awaken and recover the Empire and Constantinople from the Ottomans. His death marked the end of the Roman Empire, which had continued in the East for 977 years after the fall of the Western Roman Empire
April 8, 1408 Hedwig Jagiellon (1408–1431) a Polish and Lithuanian princess, and a member of the Jagiellon dynasty. For most of her life she, as the only child of Wladyslaw Jagiello, was considered to be heiress of the Polish and Lithuanian thrones. After the birth of Jagiello's sons in 1424 and 1427, Hedwig had some support for her claims to the throne. She died in 1431 amidst rumors that she was poisoned by her stepmother Sophia of Halshany
December 8, 1412 Astorre II Manfredi lord of Imola from 1439 and of Faenza from 1443.
September 8, 1413 Catherine of Bologna an Italian cloistered nun, artist and saint.
May 8, 1427 John Tiptoft 1st Earl of Worcester an English nobleman and scholar, Lord High Treasurer, Lord High Constable and Deputy Governor of Ireland. He was known as the Butcher of England
April 8, 1435 John Clifford 9th Baron de Clifford a Lancastrian military leader during the Wars of the Roses. For a time he was one of the strongest supporters of King Henry VI's Queen, Margaret of Anjou
September 8, 1442 John de Vere 13th Earl of Oxford one of the principal Lancastrian commanders during the English Wars of the Roses.
May 8, 1460 Frederick I Margrave of Brandenburg-Ansbach born at Ansbach as the eldest son of the Albert III, Margrave of Brandenburg by his second wife Anna, daughter of Frederick II, Elector of Saxony. His elder half-brother was the Elector Johann Cicero of Brandenburg. Friedrich succeeded his father as Margrave of Ansbach in 1486 and his younger brother as Margrave of Bayreuth in 1495
September 8, 1474 Ludovico Ariosto an Italian poet. He is best known as the author of the romance epic Orlando Furioso. The poem, a continuation of Matteo Maria Boiardo's Orlando Innamorato, describes the adventures of Charlemagne, Orlando, and the Franks as they battle against the Saracens with diversions into many sideplots. Ariosto composed the poem in the ottava rima rhyme scheme and introduced narrative commentary throughout the work
July 8, 1478 Gian Giorgio Trissino an Italian Renaissance humanist, poet, dramatist, diplomat, and grammarian.