February 5 in history

February 5 events chronologically

62 Earthquake in Pompeii, Italy
756 An Lushan, leader of a revolt against the Tang Dynasty, declares himself emperor and establishes the state of Yan
1576 Henry of Navarre abjures Catholicism at Tours and rejoins the Protestant forces in the French Wars of Religion
1597 A group of early Japanese Christians are killed by the new government of Japan for being seen as a threat to Japanese society
1631 Roger Williams emigrates to Boston
1778 South Carolina becomes the second state to ratify the Articles of Confederation
1782 Spanish defeat British forces and capture Minorca

Top 7 most famous people born on February 5

1788 Robert Peel a British Conservative statesman, who twice served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 10 December 1834 to 8 April 1835, and again from 30 August 1841 to 29 June 1846. The son of a wealthy textile manufacturer, he served in many top offices over four decades. While serving as Home Secretary, Peel reformed and liberalised the criminal law, and created the modern police force, leading to a new type of officer known in tribute to him as "bobbies" and "peelers". He cut tariffs to stimulate business; to replace the lost revenue he pushed through a 3% income tax. He played a central role in making Free Trade a reality and set up a modern banking system. Initially a supporter of legal discrimination against Catholics, Peel eventually supported the Roman Catholic Relief Act 1829, claiming "though emancipation was a great danger, civil strife was a greater danger". Peel has been criticised for his handling of the Irish famine. In 1834, Peel issued the Tamworth Manifesto, laying down the principles upon which the modern British Conservative Party is based. Peel often started from a traditional Tory position in opposition to a measure, then reversed himself and became the leader in supporting liberal legislation. This happened with the Test Act , Catholic Emancipation , the Reform Act of 1832, the income tax and most notably the repeal of the Corn Laws. Therefore many critics said he was a traitor to the Tory cause, or "a Liberal wolf in sheep's clothing" because his final position reflected liberal ideas. Historian A.J.P. Taylor says:
1870 Alfred Adler an Austrian medical doctor, psychotherapist, and founder of the school of individual psychology. His emphasis on the importance of feelings of inferiority—the inferiority complex—is recognized as isolating an element which plays a key role in personality development. Alfred Adler considered human beings as an individual whole, therefore he called his psychology "Individual Psychology"
1914 William S. Burroughs an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, painter, and spoken word performer. A primary figure of the Beat Generation and a major postmodernist author, he is considered to be "one of the most politically trenchant, culturally influential, and innovative artists of the 20th century". His influence is considered to have affected a range of popular culture as well as literature. Burroughs wrote 18 novels and novellas, six collections of short stories and four collections of essays. Five books have been published of his interviews and correspondences. He also collaborated on projects and recordings with numerous performers and musicians, and made many appearances in films
1969 Michael Sheen a Welsh actor and director. After training at London's Royal Academy of Dramatic Art , he made his professional debut in 1991, starring in When She Danced at the Gielgud Theatre. He worked mainly in theatre throughout the 1990s and made notable stage appearances in Romeo and Juliet , Don't Fool With Love , Peer Gynt , The Seagull , The Homecoming , and Henry His performances in Amadeus at the Old Vic and Look Back in Anger at the National Theatre were nominated for Olivier Awards in 1998 and 1999, respectively. In 2003, he was nominated for a third Olivier Award for his performance in Caligula at the Donmar Warehouse
1984 Carlos Tevez an Argentine professional footballer who plays as a forward for Italian club Juventus. His energy and goal scoring rate made him an indispensable player for the club in the eyes of fellow players and media alike
1985 Cristiano Ronaldo a Portuguese professional footballer who plays as a forward for Spanish club Real Madrid and captains the Portugal national team.
1992 Neymar a Brazilian professional footballer who plays for Spanish club FC Barcelona and is the captain for the Brazil national team. He plays as a forward or winger

Top 7 most famous people died on February 5

1661 Shunzhi Emperor the third emperor of the Qing dynasty and the first Qing emperor to rule over China, from 1644 to 1661. A committee of Manchu princes chose him to succeed his father, Hong Taiji , in September 1643, when he was five years old. The princes also appointed two co-regents: Dorgon , fourteenth son of Qing founder Nurhaci , and Jirgalang , one of Nurhaci's nephews, both of whom were members of the Qing imperial clan
1881 Thomas Carlyle a Scottish philosopher, satirical writer, essayist, historian and teacher. Considered one of the most important social commentators of its time, he presented many lectures during his lifetime with certain acclaim in the Victorian era. One of those conferences resulted in his famous work On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and The Heroic in History where he explains that the key role in history lies in the actions of the "Great Man", claiming that "History is nothing but the biography of the Great Man"
1971 Mátyás Rákosi a Hungarian communist politician. He was born Mátyás Rosenfeld in Ada. He was the leader of Hungary's Communist Party from 1945 to 1956 — first as General Secretary of the Hungarian Communist Party and later holding the same post with the Hungarian Working People's Party. As such, from 1949 to 1956, he was the de facto ruler of Communist Hungary. His rule was aligned with USSR politics during Joseph Stalin's government. American journalist John Gunther described Rákosi as "the most malevolent character I ever met in political life."
1993 Joseph L. Mankiewicz a film director, screenwriter, and producer. Mankiewicz had a long Hollywood career, and twice won the Academy Award for both Best Director and Best Writing, Screenplay, for A Letter to Three Wives and All About Eve
1999 Wassily Leontief a Russian-American economist notable for his research on how changes in one economic sector may have an effect on other sectors. Leontief won the Nobel Committee's Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 1973, and three of his doctoral students have also been awarded the prize
2008 Maharishi Mahesh Yogi born Mahesh Prasad Varma and obtained the honorific Maharishi and Yogi as an adult. He developed the Transcendental Meditation technique and was the leader and guru of a worldwide organization that has been characterized in multiple ways including as a new religious movement and as non-religious
2010 Harry Schwarz a South African lawyer, statesman and long-time political opposition leader against apartheid in South Africa, who eventually served as the South African ambassador to the United States during the country’s transition to majority rule.