February 1825 in history

February 1825 events chronologically

Feb 3 Vendsyssel-Thy, once part of the Jutland peninsula that formed westernmost Denmark, becomes an island after a flood drowns its 1 km wide isthmus
Feb 4 The Ohio Legislature authorizes the construction of the Ohio and Erie Canal and the Miami and Erie Canal
Feb 9 After no presidential candidate receives a majority of electoral votes in the election of 1824, the United States House of Representatives elects John Quincy Adams President of the United States
Feb 12 The Creek cede the last of their lands in Georgia to the United States government by the Treaty of Indian Springs, and migrate west

Top 7 most famous people born in February 1825

Feb 1 Francis James Child an American scholar, educator, and folklorist, best known today for his collection of folk songs known as the Child Ballads. Child was Boylston professor of rhetoric and oratory at Harvard University, where he produced influential editions of English poetry. In 1876 he was named Harvard's first Professor of English, a position which allowed him to focus on academic research. It was during this time that he began work on the Child Ballads
Feb 7 Karl Möbius a German zoologist who was a pioneer in the field of ecology and a former director of the Museum für Naturkunde in Berlin.
Feb 8 Henry Walter Bates an English naturalist and explorer who gave the first scientific account of mimicry in animals. He was most famous for his expedition to the rainforests of the Amazon with Alfred Russel Wallace, starting in 1848. Wallace returned in 1852, but lost his collection on the return voyage when his ship caught fire. When Bates arrived home in 1859 after a full eleven years, he had sent back over 14,712 species of which 8,000 were new to science. Bates wrote up his findings in his best-known work, The Naturalist on the River Amazons
Feb 8 Henri Giffard a French engineer. In 1852, he invented the steam injector and the powered airship
Feb 15 Carter Harrison Sr. an American politician who served as mayor of Chicago, Illinois from 1879 until 1887; he was subsequently elected to a fifth term in 1893 but was assassinated before completing his term. He previously served two terms in the United States House of Representatives. Harrison was the first cousin twice removed of President William Henry Harrison
Feb 18 Mór Jókai a Hungarian dramatist and novelist.
Feb 28 Jean-Baptiste Arban a cornetist, conductor, composer, pedagogue and the first famed virtuoso of the cornet à piston or valved cornet. He was influenced by Niccolò Paganini's virtuosic technique on the violin and successfully proved that the cornet was a true solo instrument by developing virtuoso technique on the instrument

Died in February 1825

Feb 6 William Eustis an early American physician, politician, and statesman from Massachusetts. Trained in medicine, he served as a military surgeon during the American Revolutionary War, notably at the Battle of Bunker Hill. He resumed medical practice after the war, but soon entered politics
Feb 11 Frederick IV Duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg the last duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg.
Feb 17 Jean-Baptiste Robert Lindet a French politician of the Revolutionary period. His brother, Robert Thomas Lindet, became a constitutional bishop and member of the National Convention. Although his role may not have been spectacular, Jean-Baptiste Lindet came to be the embodiment of the growing middle class that came to dominate French politics during the Revolution
Feb 24 Thomas Bowdler an English physician and philanthropist, best known for publishing The Family Shakspeare, an expurgated edition of William Shakespeare's work, edited by his sister Henrietta Maria Bowdler, intended to be more appropriate for 19th century women and children than the original. Although early editions of the work were published with the spelling "Shakspeare", after Bowdler's death, later editions adopted the spelling "Shakespeare", reflecting changes in the standard spelling of Shakespeare's name