Born in February

February 8, 120 Vettius Valens a 2nd-century Hellenistic astrologer, a somewhat younger contemporary of Claudius Ptolemy.
February 7, 260 Qin Shi Huang the King of the state of Qin who conquered all other Warring States and united China in 221 Rather than maintain the title of king borne by the Shang and Zhou rulers, he ruled as the First Emperor of the Qin dynasty from 220 to 210 The title emperor would continue to be borne by Chinese rulers for the next two millennia.
February 8, 412 Proclus a Greek Neoplatonist philosopher, one of the last major Classical philosophers. He set forth one of the most elaborate and fully developed systems of Neoplatonism. He stands near the end of the classical development of philosophy, and was very influential on Western medieval philosophy as well as Islamic thought
February 2, 450 Justin I Byzantine Emperor from 518 to 527. He rose through the ranks of the army and ultimately became its emperor, in spite of the fact he was illiterate and almost 70 years old at the time of accession. His reign is significant for the founding of the Justinian Dynasty that included his eminent nephew Justinian I and for the enactment of laws that de-emphasized the influence of the old Roman nobility. His consort was Empress Euphemia
February 7, 572 Prince Shōtoku a semi-legendary regent and a politician of the Asuka period in Japan who served under Empress Suiko. He was a son of Emperor Yōmei and his younger half-sister Princess Anahobe no Hashihito. His parents were relatives of the ruling Soga clan, and was involved in the defeat of the rival Mononobe Clan. The primary source of the life and accomplishments of Prince Shōtoku comes from the Nihon Shoki
February 14, 585 'Amr ibn al-'As most noted for leading the Muslim conquest of Egypt in 640. A contemporary of Muhammad, and one of the Sahaba , who rose quickly through the Muslim hierarchy following his conversion to Islam in the year 8 He founded the Egyptian capital of Fustat and built the Mosque of Amr ibn al-As at its center
February 25, 586 Prætextatus (bishop of Rouen) the bishop of Rouen from 549 until his assassination in 586.
February 17, 624 Wu Zetian a Chinese sovereign, who ruled officially under the name of her self-proclaimed "Zhou dynasty", from 690 to 705. She was the only female emperor of China in more than 4,000 years. She had previous imperial positions, however, under both Emperor Taizong of Tang and his son Emperor Gaozong of Tang, of the Tang dynasty of China. Wu was a concubine of Emperor Taizong. After his death she married his successor and ninth son, Emperor Gaozong, officially becoming Gaozong's furen in 655, although having considerable political power prior to this. After Gaozong's debilitating stroke in 690, Wu Zetian ruled as effective sovereign until 705. She is the only recorded woman to rule China in her own right
February 12, 661 Princess Ōku a Japanese princess during the Asuka period in Japanese history. She was the daughter of Emperor Temmu and sister of Prince Ōtsu. As a young girl, she witnessed the Jinshin War. According to the Man'yōshū , she became the first Saiō to serve at Ise Grand Shrine. After the death of her brother in 686, she returned from Ise to Yamato to enshrine his remains on Futakami, before a quiet end to her life at age 40
February 6, 685 Hlothhere of Kent a King of Kent who ruled from 673 to 685.
February 13, 711 Emperor Jimmu the first emperor of Japan, according to legend. His accession is traditionally dated as 660 He is a descendant of the sun goddess Amaterasu through her grandson Ninigi, as well as a descendant of the storm god Susanoo. He launched a military expedition from Hyuga near the Inland Sea, captured Yamato, and established this as his center of power
February 8, 785 Emperor Saga the 52nd emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. Saga's reign spanned the years from 809 through 823
February 6, 884 Emperor Daigo the 60th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.
February 27, 906 Conrad Duke of Thuringia the Duke of Thuringia until 892 and the Duke of Franconia until his death. He was the namesake of the Conradiner family and son of Udo of Neustria. His mother was a daughter of Conrad I of Logenahe. He was the count of the Oberlahngau , Hessengau , Gotzfeldgau , Wetterau , and Wormsgau. He united all of Hesse under his political control and thus bequeathed to his heirs what would be the Duchy of Franconia
February 21, 921 Abe no Seimei an onmyōji, a leading specialist of onmyōdō during the middle of the Heian Period in Japan. In addition to his prominence in history, he is a legendary figure in Japanese folklore and has been portrayed in a number of stories and films
February 3, 929 Guy Margrave of Tuscany the son of Adalbert II of Tuscany with Bertha, daughter of Lothair II of Lotharingia.
February 28, 929 Adalbert I of Ivrea the margrave of Ivrea, the second of the Anscarid dynasty, from the late 890s until his death. In the intermittent civil war that effecting Italy from 888 into the 930s, Adalbert initially strove to remain neutral, but from 901 on he sided sequentially with every claimant to the Italian throne
February 6, 975 Emperor Sanjō the 67th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.
February 13, 988 Adalbert Atto of Canossa the first Count of Canossa and founder of that noble house which eventually was to play a determinant rôle in the political settling of Italy and the Investiture Controversy in the eleventh and twelfth centuries.
February 16, 1032 Emperor Yingzong of Song the fifth emperor of the Song Dynasty of China. His personal name was originally Zhao Zongshi but he later changed it to Zhao Shu. He reigned from 1063 to 1067. His temple name means "Outstandingly Talented Ancestor"
February 22, 1040 Rashi a medieval French rabbi and author of a comprehensive commentary on the Talmud and commentary on the Tanakh. Acclaimed for his ability to present the basic meaning of the text in a concise and lucid fashion, Rashi appeals to both learned scholars and beginning students, and his works remain a centerpiece of contemporary Jewish study. His commentary on the Talmud, which covers nearly all of the Babylonian Talmud , has been included in every edition of the Talmud since its first printing by Daniel Bomberg in the 1520s. His commentary on Tanach — especially on the Chumash — is an indispensable aid to students of all levels. The latter commentary alone serves as the basis for more than 300 "supercommentaries" which analyze Rashi's choice of language and citations, penned by some of the greatest names in rabbinic literature
February 13, 1067 Geoffrey II of Provence the first count of Forcalquier following the death of his father Fulk Bertrand in 1062. His elder brother Bertrand II inherited Provence, but not the title of margrave. Geoffrey himself is often counted amongst the co-counts of Provence of the era. It is not certain that his region of Forcalquier was regarded as a dinstinct entity and not merely the Provençal demesne under his charge
February 28, 1069 Abbad II al-Mu'tadid the second independent Muslim ruler of Seville in Al-Andalus. His father, Abu al-Qasim Muhammad ibn Abbad, had established the Muslim taifa of Seville, and Abbad became its ruler when Abu al-Qasim died in 1042. He initially had amicable relations with his neighbour Ferdinand I, Count of Castile and King of León, and tolerated the Christian faith in his own lands. Among other acts of friendship, he authorized the transfer of Saint Isidore's relics from Seville to the Basilica of San Isidoro of León
February 22, 1071 Arnulf III Count of Flanders a.k.a Arnulf 'the unlucky' became Count of Flanders as a minor in 1070 and until his death in 1071.
February 12, 1074 Conrad II of Italy the Duke of Lower Lorraine , King of Germany and King of Italy. He was the second son of Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV and Bertha of Savoy, and their eldest son to reach adulthood, his older brother Henry having been born and died in the same month of August 1071. Although Conrad's rule in Lorraine and Germany was nominal, he spent most of his life in Italy and there he was king in fact as well as in name
February 27, 1076 Godfrey IV Duke of Lower Lorraine a son of Godfrey the Bearded, whom he succeeded as Duke of Lower Lorraine in 1069. His mother was Doda and his sister was Ida
February 16, 1084 Siegfried I (archbishop of Mainz) the Abbot of Fulda from 25 December 1058 until 6 January 1060, and from January 1060 until his death in February 1084, he was Archbishop of Mainz.
February 7, 1102 Empress Matilda the claimant to the English throne during the civil war known as the Anarchy. The daughter of King Henry I of England, she moved to Germany as a child when she married the future Holy Roman Emperor Henry She travelled with her husband into Italy in 1116, was controversially crowned in Peter's Basilica, and acted as the imperial regent in Italy. Matilda and Henry had no children, and when he died in 1125, the crown was claimed by Lothair II, one of his political enemies
February 24, 1102 Constantine I Prince of Armenia the second lord of Armenian Cilicia or “Lord of the Mountains”. During his rule, he controlled the greater part of the regions around the Taurus Mountains, and invested much of his efforts in cultivating the lands and rebuilding the towns within his domain. He provided ample provisions to the Crusaders, for example during the difficult period of the siege of Antioch in the winter of 1097. He was a passionate adherent of the separated Armenian Church
February 24, 1103 Emperor Toba the 74th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.
February 28, 1119 Emperor Xizong of Jin reigned from February 10, 1135 to January 9, 1150 as an emperor of the Jin Dynasty which controlled northern China from 1115 to 1234. His birth name was Wányán Hélá. His Han Chinese name was Wányán Dǎn. During his reign, the Jurchens were engaged in a war with the Song Dynasty
February 12, 1128 Toghtekin a Turkic military leader, who was atabeg of Damascus from 1104 to 1128. He was the founder of the Burid dynasty of Damascus
February 28, 1155 Henry the Young King the second of five sons of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine but the first to survive infancy. He was officially King of England; Duke of Normandy, Count of Anjou and Maine
February 14, 1164 Sviatoslav Olgovich the Prince of Novgorod ; Novgorod-Seversky ; Belgorod Kievsky ; and Chernigov. He was the son of Oleg Sviatoslavich, Prince of Chernigov with an unnamed daughter of Asaduk, Khan of Khumans
February 7, 1165 Stephen of Armenia the Marshal of Armenia, the son of Leo I, Prince of Armenia and Beatrice de Rethel.
February 22, 1169 Shirkuh a Kurdish military commander, and uncle of Saladin. His military and diplomatic efforts in Egypt were a key factor in establishing the Ayyubid family in that country
February 23, 1187 Ferdinand Count of Flanders reigned as jure uxoris Count of Flanders and Hainaut from his marriage to Countess Joan, celebrated in Paris in 1212, until his death. He was born in Coimbra, and he was an Infante of Portugal as the fourth son of King Sancho I of Portugal and Dulce of Aragon
February 23, 1187 Peter I Count of Urgell the second son of King Sancho I of Portugal and his wife Dulce, infanta of Aragon, and would eventually become Count of Urgell and Lord of the Balearic Islands.
February 8, 1191 Yaroslav II of Vladimir the Grand Prince of Vladimir who helped to restore his country and capital after the Mongol invasion of Russia.
February 20, 1194 Tancred King of Sicily King of Sicily from 1189 to 1194. He was born in Lecce an illegitimate son of Roger III, Duke of Apulia by his mistress Emma, a daughter of Achard II, Count of Lecce. He inherited the title "Count of Lecce" from his grandfather and is consequently often referred to as Tancred of Lecce. Although a member of the Hauteville family, due to his illegitimate status he was known by the surname, Fitz Roger, meaning "son of Roger"
February 17, 1201 Nasir al-Din al-Tusi a Persian polymath and prolific writer: An architect, astronomer, biologist, chemist, mathematician, philosopher, physician, physicist, scientist, theologian and Marja Taqleed. He was of the Ismaili-, and subsequently Twelver Shī‘ah Islamic belief. The Muslim scholar Ibn Khaldun considered Tusi to be the greatest of the later Persian scholars
February 2, 1208 James I of Aragon King of Aragon, Valencia and Majorca, Count of Barcelona and Lord of Montpellier from 1213 to 1276. His long reign saw the expansion of the House of Aragón on all sides: into Valencia to the south, Languedoc to the north, and the Balearic Islands to the east. By a treaty with Louis IX of France, he wrested the county of Barcelona from nominal French suzerainty and integrated it into his crown. His part in the Reconquista was similar in Mediterranean Spain to that of his contemporary Ferdinand III of Castile in Andalusia
February 12, 1218 Kujō Yoritsune the fourth shogun of the Kamakura shogunate of Japan. His father was kanpaku Kujō Michiie and his grandmother was a niece of Minamoto no Yoritomo. He was born in the year of the Tiger, in the month, on the day, and so his given name at birth was Mitora
February 20, 1243 Romano Bonaventura a Catholic Christian prelate, Cardinal deacon of Sant'Angelo in Pescheria, his titulus , bishop of Porto-Santa Rufina , a cardinal-legate to the court of France.
February 1, 1261 Walter de Stapledon Bishop of Exeter 1308–1326 and twice Lord High Treasurer of England, in 1320 and 1322. He founded Exeter College, Oxford and contributed liberally to the rebuilding of Exeter Cathedral. His tomb and monument, of great architectural importance, survives in Exeter Cathedral
February 11, 1261 Otto III Duke of Bavaria Duke of Lower Bavaria from 1290 to 1312 and disputably King of Hungary and Croatia between 1305 and 1307 as Béla V.
February 28, 1261 Margaret of Scotland Queen of Norway Queen of Norway as the wife of King Eric II.
February 24, 1265 Roger IV Count of Foix the seventh count of Foix from 1241 to his death. His reign began with the south again at war with the north in France and, though he was reluctant to join his father's old ally, Raymond VII of Toulouse, in revolt and he did not aid the king of England, Henry III, in his Saintonge War
February 21, 1267 Baldwin of Ibelin Seneschal of Cyprus the fourth of five sons of John I of Beirut and his second wife Melisende of Arsuf.
February 16, 1270 Otto von Lutterberg the Ordensmeister of the Livonian Order of the Teutonic Knights from 1266 to 1270, and was in command of the Livonian Order in 1268 when the Knights were heavily defeated by a Russian army at the Battle of Rakvere.