January 14 in history

January 14 events chronologically

1301 Andrew III of Hungary dies, ending the Árpád dynasty in Hungary
1343 Arnošt of Pardubice becomes the last bishop of Prague and, subsequently, the first Archbishop of Prague
1539 Spain annexes Cuba
1639 The "Fundamental Orders", the first written constitution that created a government, is adopted in Connecticut
1724 King Philip V of Spain abdicates the throne
1761 The Third Battle of Panipat is fought in India between the Afghans under Ahmad Shah Durrani and the Marhatas
1784 American Revolutionary War: Ratification Day, United States - Congress ratifies the Treaty of Paris with Great Britain

Top 7 most famous people born on January 14

83 Mark Antony a Roman politician and general who played a critical role in the transformation of the Roman Republic from an oligarchy into the autocratic Roman Empire.
1741 Benedict Arnold a general during the American Revolutionary War who originally fought for the American Continental Army but defected to the British Army. While a general on the American side, he obtained command of the fortifications at West Point, New York , overlooking the cliffs at the Hudson River , and planned to surrender it to the British forces. After the plan was exposed in September 1780, he was commissioned into the British Army as a brigadier general
1875 Albert Schweitzer a German—and later French—theologian, organist, philosopher, physician, and medical missionary in Africa, also known for his interpretive life of Jesus. He was born in the province of Alsace-Lorraine, at that time part of the German Empire, considered himself French and wrote mostly in French. Schweitzer, a Lutheran, challenged both the secular view of Jesus as depicted by historical-critical methodology current at his time in certain academic circles, as well as the traditional Christian view
1919 Giulio Andreotti the 41st Prime Minister of Italy and leader of the Christian Democracy party. Occupying all the major offices of state over the course of a forty-year political career, he was a figure who reassured the civil service, business community, and the Vatican, while guiding Italy's European Union integration. In foreign policy, he established closer relations with the Arab world. Admirers of Andreotti saw him as having mediated political and social contradictions, enabling the transformation of a substantially rural country into the fifth-biggest economy in the world. Critics said he had done nothing against a system of patronage that had led to pervasive corruption. Despite a wry sense of humour that could sound like cynicism, Andreotti was a devout Catholic with a relatively modest lifestyle who did not use his position to enrich himself or his family
1925 Yukio Mishima the pen name of Kimitake Hiraoka , a Japanese author, poet, playwright, actor, and film director. Mishima is considered one of the most important Japanese authors of the 20th century; he was nominated three times for the Nobel Prize in Literature and was poised to win the prize in 1968 but lost the award to his fellow countryman Yasunari Kawabata, presumably because of his radical right-wing activities. His avant-garde work displayed a blending of modern and traditional aesthetics that broke cultural boundaries, with a focus on sexuality, death, and political change. He is remembered for his ritual suicide by seppuku after a failed coup d'état attempt, known as the "Mishima Incident"
1963 Steven Soderbergh an American film producer, screenwriter, cinematographer, editor, and director. He is best known for directing critically acclaimed commercial Hollywood films like Out of Sight, Erin Brockovich, Traffic and Contagion, and the remake of Ocean's Eleven. He has also directed smaller, less conventional works, such as Sex, Lies, and Videotape; Schizopolis; Bubble; Kafka; The Girlfriend Experience; and Che
1969 Dave Grohl an American rock musician, multi-instrumentalist, singer-songwriter, producer, and film director, who first gained recognition and fame as the drummer for the grunge band Nirvana. He is also the lead vocalist, rhythm guitarist, main songwriter and founder of the band Foo Fighters

Top 7 most famous people died on January 14

1742 Edmond Halley best known for computing the orbit of the eponymous Halley's Comet. He was the second Astronomer Royal in Britain, succeeding John Flamsteed
1753 George Berkeley an Anglo-Irish philosopher whose primary achievement was the advancement of a theory he called "immaterialism". This theory denies the existence of material substance and instead contends that familiar objects like tables and chairs are only ideas in the minds of perceivers, and as a result cannot exist without being perceived. Berkeley is also known for his critique of abstraction, an important premise in his argument for immaterialism
1867 Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres a French Neoclassical painter. Although he considered himself to be a painter of history in the tradition of Nicolas Poussin and Jacques-Louis David, by the end of his life it was Ingres's portraits, both painted and drawn, that were recognized as his greatest legacy
1898 Lewis Carroll an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, which includes the poem Jabberwocky, and the poem The Hunting of the Snark, all examples of the genre of literary nonsense. He is noted for his facility at word play, logic, and fantasy. There are societies in many parts of the world dedicated to the enjoyment and promotion of his works and the investigation of his life
1957 Humphrey Bogart an American screen actor who, with performances in films during the 1940s such as The Maltese Falcon, Casablanca, and The Big Sleep, became widely regarded as a cultural icon. In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked Bogart as the greatest male star in the history of American cinema
1977 Anthony Eden an English Conservative politician who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1955 to 1957. He was also Foreign Secretary for three periods between 1935 and 1955, including during World War He is best known for his outspoken opposition to appeasement in the 1930s; his diplomatic leadership in the 1940s and 1950s; and the failure of his Middle East policy in 1956 that ended his premiership
1978 Kurt Gödel an Austrian, and later American, logician, mathematician, and philosopher. Considered with Aristotle and Gottlob Frege to be one of the most significant logicians in history, Gödel made an immense impact upon scientific and philosophical thinking in the 20th century, a time when others such as Bertrand Russell, N. Whitehead, and David Hilbert were pioneering the use of logic and set theory to understand the foundations of mathematics