January 19 in history

January 19 events chronologically

379 Emperor Gratian elevates Flavius Theodosius at Sirmium to Augustus, and gives him power over all the eastern provinces of the Roman Empire
639 Clovis II, king of Neustria and Burgundy, is crowned
649 Conquest of Kucha: The forces of Kucha surrender after a forty-day siege led by Tang Dynasty general Ashina She'er, establishing Tang control over the northern Tarim Basin in Xinjiang
1419 Hundred Years' War: Rouen surrenders to Henry V of England, completing his reconquest of Normandy
1511 Mirandola surrenders to the French
1520 Sten Sture the Younger, the Regent of Sweden, is mortally wounded at the Battle of Bogesund
1607 San Agustin Church in Manila is officially completed; it is the oldest church still standing in the Philippines

Top 7 most famous people born on January 19

1736 James Watt a Scottish inventor and mechanical engineer whose improvements to the Newcomen steam engine were fundamental to the changes brought by the Industrial Revolution in both his native Great Britain and the rest of the world.
1807 Robert E. Lee an American soldier best known for commanding the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia in the American Civil War from 1862 until his surrender in 1865. The son of Revolutionary War officer Henry "Light Horse Harry" Lee III and a top graduate of the United States Military Academy, Robert Lee was an exceptional officer and combat engineer in the United States Army for 32 years. During this time, he served throughout the United States, distinguished himself during the Mexican–American War, served as Superintendent of the United States Military Academy, and married Mary Custis
1809 Edgar Allan Poe an American author, poet, editor, and literary critic, considered part of the American Romantic Movement. Best known for his tales of mystery and the macabre, Poe was one of the earliest American practitioners of the short story, and is generally considered the inventor of the detective fiction genre. He is further credited with contributing to the emerging genre of science fiction. He was the first well-known American writer to try to earn a living through writing alone, resulting in a financially difficult life and career
1839 Paul Cézanne a French artist and Post-Impressionist painter whose work laid the foundations of the transition from the 19th-century conception of artistic endeavour to a new and radically different world of art in the 20th century. Cézanne's often repetitive, exploratory brushstrokes are highly characteristic and clearly recognizable. He used planes of colour and small brushstrokes that build up to form complex fields. The paintings convey Cézanne's intense study of his subjects
1943 Janis Joplin an American singer-songwriter who first rose to fame in the late 1960s as the lead singer of the psychedelic-acid rock band Big Brother and the Holding Company, and later as a solo artist with her own backing groups, The Kozmic Blues Band and The Full Tilt Boogie Band. Her first ever large scale public performance was at the Monterey Pop Festival, this led her to becoming very popular and one of the major attractions to the Woodstock festival and the Festival Express train tour. Joplin charted five singles, and other popular songs from her four-year solo career include "Down on Me", "Summertime", "Piece of My Heart", "Ball 'n' Chain", "Maybe", "To Love Somebody", "Kozmic Blues", "Work Me, Lord", "Cry Baby", "Mercedes Benz", and her only number one hit, "Me and Bobby McGee"
1946 Dolly Parton an American singer-songwriter, instrumentalist, actress, author, and philanthropist. Her career began as a child performer on the radio, then recording a few singles from the age of 13. She rose to prominence in 1967 as a featured performer on singer Porter Wagoner's weekly syndicated TV program; their first duet single, a cover of Tom Paxton's "The Last Thing on My Mind", was a top-ten hit on the country singles chart and led to several successful albums before they ended their partnership in 1974. Moving towards mainstream pop music, her 1977 single "Here You Come Again" was a success on both the country and pop charts. A string of pop-country hits followed into the mid-1980s, the most successful being her 1981 hit "9 to 5" and her 1983 duet with Kenny Rogers "Islands in the Stream", both of which topped the U.S. pop and country singles charts. A pair of albums recorded with Linda Ronstadt and Emmylou Harris were among her later successes. In the late 1990s, she returned to classic country/bluegrass with a series of acclaimed recordings. Non-musical ventures include Dollywood, a theme park in Pigeon Forge in the Smoky Mountains of Tennessee, and her efforts on behalf of childhood literacy, particularly her Imagination Library, as well as Dolly Parton's Dixie Stampede and Pirates Voyage
1980 Jenson Button a British Formula One driver from England currently signed to McLaren. He was the 2009 Formula One World Champion, driving for Brawn GP

Top 7 most famous people died on January 19

1629 Abbas I of Persia the 5th Safavid Shah Emperor of Iran, and generally considered the greatest ruler of the Safavid dynasty. He was the third son of Shah Mohammad
1865 Pierre-Joseph Proudhon a French politician, the founder of Mutualist philosophy, an economist and a socialist. He was the first person to declare himself an anarchist and is among its most influential theorists. He is considered by many to be the "father of anarchism". He became a member of the French Parliament after the revolution of 1848, whereafter he referred to himself as a federalist
1981 Francesca Woodman an American photographer best known for her black and white pictures featuring herself and female models. Many of her photographs show young women who are nude, blurred , merging with their surroundings, or whose faces are obscured. Her work continues to be the subject of much critical acclaim and attention, years after she killed herself at the age of 22
1990 Rajneesh an Indian mystic, guru and spiritual teacher. His international following has continued beyond his death
2000 Hedy Lamarr an Austrian and American actress and inventor. After an early film career in Germany, which culminated in her controversial nude scenes in the film Ecstasy , Lamarr moved to Hollywood at the invitation of MGM head Louis Mayer, and soon became a star during the studio's golden age
2007 Hrant Dink a Turkish-Armenian editor, journalist and columnist.
2013 Stan Musial an American professional baseball player and Navy veteran of World War He was a Major League Baseball outfielder and first baseman on the Louis Cardinals for 22 seasons, from 1941 through 1963. Nicknamed "Stan the Man", Musial is widely considered to be one of the greatest hitters in baseball history. He compiled 3,630 career hits, ranking fourth all-time and first in a career spent with only one team. With 1,815 hits at home and 1,815 on the road, he also is considered to be the most consistent hitter of his era. He hit 475 home runs during his career, was named the National League's Most Valuable Player three times, and won three World Series championship titles. He shares the MLB record for the most All-Star Games played with Hank Aaron and Willie Mays. Musial was a first-ballot inductee into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1969. He was also selected to the Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame in the inaugural class of 2014