January 21 in history

January 21 events chronologically

763 The Battle of Bakhamra between Alids and Abbasids near Kufa ends in a decisive Abbasid victory
1525 The Swiss Anabaptist Movement is founded when Conrad Grebel, Felix Manz, George Blaurock, and about a dozen others baptize each other in the home of Manz's mother in Zürich, breaking a thousand-year tradition of church-state union
1535 Following the Affair of the Placards, French Protestants are burned at the stake in front of the Cathedral of Notre-Dame de Paris
1720 Sweden and Prussia sign the Treaty of Stockholm
1749 The Teatro Filarmonico in Verona is destroyed by fire. It is rebuilt in 1754
1774 Abdul Hamid I became Sultan of the Ottoman Empire and Caliph of Islam
1789 The first American novel, The Power of Sympathy or the Triumph of Nature Founded in Truth, is printed in Boston, Massachusetts

Top 7 most famous people born on January 21

1813 John C. Frémont an American military officer, explorer, and politician who became the first candidate of the anti-slavery Republican Party for the office of President of the United States. During the 1840s, when he led four expeditions into the American West, that era's penny press and admiring historians accorded Frémont the sobriquet The Pathfinder
1824 Stonewall Jackson a Confederate general during the American Civil War, and one of the best-known Confederate commanders after General Robert Lee. His military career includes the Valley Campaign of 1862 and his service as a corps commander in the Army of Northern Virginia under Robert Lee. Confederate pickets accidentally shot him at the Battle of Chancellorsville on May 2, 1863. The general survived with the loss of an arm to amputation, but died of complications from pneumonia eight days later. His death was a severe setback for the Confederacy, affecting not only its military prospects, but also the morale of its army and of the general public. Jackson in death became an icon of Southern heroism and commitment, becoming a mainstay in the pantheon of the "Lost Cause"
1940 Jack Nicklaus a retired American professional golfer. He is widely regarded as the greatest professional golfer of all time, winning a total of 18 career major championships, while producing 19 second place and 9 third place finishes in them, over a span of 25 years. Nicklaus focused on the major championships , and played a selective schedule of regular PGA Tour events, yet still finished with 73 victories, third on the all-time list
1941 Plácido Domingo a Spanish tenor and conductor known for his versatile and strong voice, possessing a ringing and dramatic tone throughout its range. As of the end of 2013, he has sung 144 different roles
1951 Eric Holder the 82nd Attorney General of the United States, in office since 2009. Holder, serving in the administration of President Barack Obama, is the first African American to hold the position of U.S. Attorney General. As of 2014, Holder is one of three members of the original Obama cabinet that are still serving in their posts: the others being Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and Education Secretary Arne Duncan
1953 Paul Allen an American philanthropist, investor and innovator, best known as the co-founder of Microsoft Corporation, with Bill Gates. As of August 2014, he was estimated to be the 55th richest person in the world, with an estimated wealth of $16.4 billion
1963 Hakeem Olajuwon a retired Nigerian-American professional basketball player. From 1984 to 2002, he played the center position in the National Basketball Association for the Houston Rockets and Toronto Raptors. He led the Rockets to back-to-back NBA championships in 1994 and 1995. In 2008, he was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame. Listed at 7 ft 0 in , Olajuwon is considered one of the greatest centers ever to play the game. He was nicknamed "The Dream" during his basketball career, for his grace on and off the court

Top 7 most famous people died on January 21

1789 Baron d'Holbach a French-German author, philosopher, encyclopedist and a prominent figure in the French Enlightenment. He was born Paul Heinrich Dietrich in Edesheim, near Landau in the Rhenish Palatinate, but lived and worked mainly in Paris, where he kept a salon. He was well known for his atheism and for his voluminous writings against religion, the most famous of them being The System of Nature
1793 Louis XVI of France King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, after which he was subsequently King of the French from 1791 to 1792, before his deposition and execution during the French Revolution. His father, Louis, Dauphin of France, was the son and heir apparent of Louis XV of France. As a result of the Dauphin's death in 1765, Louis succeeded his grandfather in 1774
1892 John Couch Adams a British mathematician and astronomer. Adams was born in Laneast, near Launceston, Cornwall, and died in Cambridge. The Cornish name Couch is pronounced "cooch"
1924 Vladimir Lenin a Russian communist revolutionary, politician and political theorist. He served as head of government of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic from 1917, and of the Soviet Union from 1922 until his death. Under his administration, the Russian Empire was replaced by the Soviet Union; all wealth including land, industry and business was nationalized. Based in Marxism, his political theories are known as Leninism
1938 Georges Méliès a French illusionist and filmmaker famous for leading many technical and narrative developments in the earliest days of cinema. Méliès, a prolific innovator in the use of special effects, accidentally discovered the substitution stop trick in 1896, and was one of the first filmmakers to use multiple exposures, time-lapse photography, dissolves, and hand-painted color in his work. Because of his ability to seemingly manipulate and transform reality through cinematography, Méliès is sometimes referred to as the first "Cinemagician". His films include A Trip to the Moon and The Impossible Voyage , both involving strange, surreal journeys somewhat in the style of Jules Verne, and are considered among the most important early science fiction films, though their approach is closer to fantasy. Méliès was also an early pioneer of horror cinema, which can be traced back to his The Haunted Castle
1950 George Orwell an English novelist, essayist, journalist and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice, opposition to totalitarianism, and commitment to democratic socialism
1959 Cecil B. DeMille an American film director and film producer in both silent and sound films.