January 27 in history

January 27 events chronologically

98 Trajan succeeded his adoptive father Nerva as Roman emperor; under his rule the Roman Empire would reach its maximum extent
661 The Rashidun Caliphate ends with the death of Ali
1142 Song Dynasty General Yue Fei is executed
1186 Henry VI, the son and heir of the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick I, marries Constance of Sicily
1302 Dante Alighieri, the poet and politician is exiled from Florence, Italy, where he served as one of six priors governing the city
1343 Pope Clement VI issues the papal bull Unigenitus to justify the power of the pope and the use of indulgences. Nearly 200 years later, Martin Luther would protest this
1593 The Vatican opens the seven-year trial of scholar Giordano Bruno

Top 7 most famous people born on January 27

1756 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart a prolific and influential composer of the Classical era.
1832 Lewis Carroll an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon and photographer. His most famous writings are Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, its sequel Through the Looking-Glass, which includes the poem Jabberwocky, and the poem The Hunting of the Snark, all examples of the genre of literary nonsense. He is noted for his facility at word play, logic, and fantasy. There are societies in many parts of the world dedicated to the enjoyment and promotion of his works and the investigation of his life
1859 Wilhelm II German Emperor the last German Emperor and King of Prussia, ruling the German Empire and the Kingdom of Prussia from 15 June 1888 to 9 November 1918. He was the eldest grandson of the British Queen Victoria and related to many monarchs and princes of Europe
1872 Learned Hand a United States judge and judicial philosopher. He served on the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York and later the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Hand has been quoted more often by legal scholars and by the Supreme Court of the United States than any other lower-court judge
1944 Mairead Maguire a peace activist from Northern Ireland. She co-founded, with Betty Williams and Ciaran McKeown, the Women for Peace, which later became the Community for Peace People, an organisation dedicated to encouraging a peaceful resolution of the Troubles in Northern Ireland. Maguire and Williams were awarded the 1976 Nobel Peace Prize. Maguire has also won several other awards
1955 John Roberts the 17th and current Chief Justice of the United States. He has served since 2005, having been nominated by President George Bush after the death of Chief Justice William Rehnquist. He has been described as having a conservative judicial philosophy in his jurisprudence
1980 Marat Safin a Russian politician and retired tennis player. Safin won two Grand Slam tournaments and reached the world 1 ranking during his career. He was also famous for his emotional outbursts and sometimes fiery temper on court. Safin is the older brother of former world 1 WTA player, Dinara Safina. They are the first brother-sister tandem in tennis history who both achieved 1 rankings

Top 7 most famous people died on January 27

1596 Francis Drake an English sea captain, privateer, navigator, slaver, and politician of the Elizabethan era. Drake carried out the second circumnavigation of the world, from 1577 to 1580
1901 Giuseppe Verdi an Italian Romantic composer primarily known for his operas. He is considered, together with Richard Wagner, the preeminent opera composer of the nineteenth century
2008 Suharto the second President of Indonesia, holding the office for 31 years from Sukarno's ouster in 1967 until his resignation in 1998.
2009 John Updike an American novelist, poet, short story writer, art critic, and literary critic.
2010 J. D. Salinger Jerome David "J. D." Salinger was an American writer who won acclaim early in life. He led a very private life for more than a half-century. He published his final original work in 1965 and gave his last interview in 1980
2010 Howard Zinn an American historian, author, playwright, and social activist. He was a political science professor at Boston University for 24 years and taught history at Spelman College for 7 years. Zinn wrote more than 20 books, including his best-selling and influential A People's History of the United States. He wrote extensively about the civil rights and anti-war movements, and labor history of the United States. His memoir, You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train, was also the title of a 2004 documentary about Zinn's life and work
2014 Pete Seeger an American folk singer and activist. A fixture on nationwide radio in the 1940s, he also had a string of hit records during the early 1950s as a member of the Weavers, most notably their recording of Lead Belly's "Goodnight, Irene", which topped the charts for 13 weeks in 1950. Members of the Weavers were blacklisted during the McCarthy Era. In the 1960s, he re-emerged on the public scene as a prominent singer of protest music in support of international disarmament, civil rights, counterculture and environmental causes