Died on July 1

552 Totila the penultimate King of the Ostrogoths, reigning from 541 to 552 A skilled military and political leader, Totila reversed the tide of Gothic War, recovering by 543 almost all the territories in Italy that the Eastern Roman Empire had captured from his Kingdom in 540.
868 Ali al-Hadi the tenth of the Twelve Imams. His full name is ‘Alī ibn Muhammad ibn ‘Alī. The exact date of his birth and death are unknown, but it is generally accepted that he was born between 827–830 CE and he died in 868 CE
1175 Reginald de Dunstanville 1st Earl of Cornwall an illegitimate son of Henry I of England and Lady Sybilla Corbet.
1242 Chagatai Khan the second son of Genghis Khan. He was Khan of the Chagatai Khanate from 1226-1242 C.E. The Chagatai language and Chagatai Turks take their names from him. He inherited most of what are now the five Central Asian states after the death of his father. He was also appointed by Genghis Khan to oversee the execution of the Yassa, the written code of law created by Genghis Khan, though that lasted only until Genghis Khan was crowned Khan of the Mongol Empire. The Empire later came to be known as the Chagatai Khanate, a descendant empire of the Mongol Empire. Chagatai Khan was considered hot-headed and somewhat temperamental by his relatives, because of his attitude of non-acceptance of Jochi as Great Khan. He was the most vocal about this issue among his relations. Chaghatai himself appears to have been a just and energetic governor, though perhaps rough and uncouth, and addicted to hard drinking. At any rate, he was animated by the soldier-like spirit of his father, and succeeded in keeping order among as heterogeneous a population, as a kingdom was ever composed of
1277 Baibars the fourth Sultan of Egypt from the Mamluk Bahri dynasty. He was one of the commanders of the Egyptian forces that inflicted a defeat on the Seventh Crusade of King Louis IX of France. He also led the vanguard of the Egyptian army at the Battle of Ain Jalut in 1260, which marked the first substantial defeat of the Mongol army and is considered a turning point in history
1482 Alfonso Carrillo de Acuña a Spanish politician and Roman Catholic archbishop.
1555 John Bradford a prebendary of Paul's. He was an English Reformer and martyr. Bradford was in the Tower of London for alleged crimes against Mary Tudor for his Protestant faith. Bradford was burned at the stake on 1 July 1555
1589 Lady Saigō the first consort and trusted confidante of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the samurai lord who unified Japan at the end of the sixteenth century and then ruled as Shogun. She was also the mother of the second Tokugawa shogun, Tokugawa Hidetada
1592 Marc'Antonio Ingegneri an Italian composer of the late Renaissance. He was born in Verona and died in Cremona. Even though he spent most of his life working in northern Italy, because of his stylistic similarity to Palestrina he is often considered to be a member of the Roman School of polyphonic church music. He is also famous as the teacher of Claudio Monteverdi
1614 Isaac Casaubon a classical scholar and philologist, first in France and then later in England, regarded by many of his time as the most learned man in Europe.
1622 William Parker 4th Baron Monteagle an English peer, best known for his role in the discovery of the Gunpowder Plot. In 1605 Parker was due to attend the opening of Parliament. He was a member of the House of Lords as Lord Monteagle, the title on his mother's side. He received a letter: it appears that someone, presumably a fellow Catholic, was afraid he would be blown The so-called Monteagle letter survives in the National Archives , but its origin remains mysterious
1673 Fyodor Rtishchev a boyar and an intimate friend of Alexis I of Russia who was renowned for his piety and alms-deeds.
1681 Oliver Plunkett the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland who was the last victim of the Popish Plot. Plunkett was beatified in 1920 and canonised in 1975, the first new Irish saint for almost seven hundred years
1690 Philipp Duke of Saxe-Merseburg-Lauchstädt a German prince. He was a member of the House of Wettin
1717 Princess Anna Sophie of Denmark the eldest daughter of King Frederick III of Denmark and Sophie Amalie of Brunswick-Lüneburg, and Electress of Saxony from 1680 to 1691 as the wife of John George III.
1726 Countess Charlotte of Hanau-Lichtenberg the wife of Duke Louis VIII of Hesse-Darmstadt.
1736 Ahmed III Sultan of the Ottoman Empire and a son of Sultan Mehmed His mother was Mâh-Pâre Ummatullah Râbi'a Gül-Nûş Valide Sultan, originally named Evmania Voria, who was an ethnic Greek. He was born at Hajioglupazari, in Dobruja. He succeeded to the throne in 1703 on the abdication of his brother Mustafa Nevşehirli Damat İbrahim Pasha and his daughter, Hatice Sultan directed the government from 1718 to 1730, a period referred to as the Tulip Era
1742 Bohuslav Matěj Černohorský a Czech composer, organist and teacher of the baroque era. He wrote among other works motets, other choral works and organ solo works
1756 Franciszek Maksymilian Ossoliński a Polish noble , politician, collector and patron of arts.
1774 Henry Fox 1st Baron Holland a leading British politician of the 18th century. He identified primarily with the Whig faction. He notably held the posts of Secretary for War, Southern Secretary and Paymaster of the forces, from which he enriched himself, but while widely tipped as a future Prime Minister, he never held that office. He was the father of Charles James Fox
1777 Dai Zhen a prominent Chinese scholar of the Qing dynasty from Xiuning, Anhui. A versatile scholar, he made great contributions to mathematics, geography, phonology and philosophy. His philosophical and philological critiques of Neo-Confucianism continue to be influential
1782 Charles Watson-Wentworth 2nd Marquess of Rockingham KG, PC , styled The Hon. Charles Watson-Wentworth before 1733, Viscount Higham between 1733 and 1746, Earl of Malton between 1746 and 1750 and The Marquess of Rockingham in 1750, was a British Whig statesman, most notable for his two terms as Prime Minister of Great Britain. He became the patron of many Whigs, known as the Rockingham Whigs, and served as a leading Whig grandee. He served in only two high offices during his lifetime , but was nonetheless very influential during his one and a half years of service
1784 Wilhelm Friedemann Bach a German composer and performer. Despite his acknowledged genius as an organist, improviser and composer, his income and employment were unstable and he died in poverty
1785 Ishikawa Toyonobu a Japanese ukiyo-e print artist. He is sometimes said to have been the same person as Nishimura Shigenobu, a contemporary ukiyo-e artist and student of Nishimura Shigenaga about whom very little is known
1787 Charles Prince of Soubise a military man, and a minister to the kings Louis XV and Louis XVI. The last male of his branch of the House of Rohan, he was also the great grandfather to the duc d'Enghien, executed by Napoleon in 1804. Styled prince d'Epinoy at birth, he became the Prince of Soubise after 1749
1805 Pinchas Horowitz a rabbi and Talmudist.
1819 Jemima Wilkinson a charismatic American evangelist who preached total sexual abstinence and the Ten Commandments to their Quaker "Society of Universal Friends." Their family were strict Quakers, most of their views were from their upbringing in the Quaker religion.
1824 Lachlan Macquarie a British Army officer and colonial administrator from Scotland. He served as the fifth and last autocratic Governor of New South Wales from 1810 to 1821, and had a leading role in the social, economic and architectural development of the colony. He is considered by historians to have had a crucial influence on the transition of New South Wales from a penal colony to a free settlement and therefore to have played a major role in the shaping of Australian society in the early nineteenth century. An inscription on his tomb in Scotland describes him as "The Father of Australia"
1839 Mahmud II the 30th Sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1808 until his death in 1839. He was born in the Topkapi Palace, Constantinople, the posthumous son of Sultan Abdulhamid His reign is notable mostly for the extensive administrative, military and fiscal reforms he instituted, which culminated into the Decree of Tanzimat that was carried out by his sons Abdülmecid I and Abdülaziz In 1826 he abolished the Janissary corps of 135,000 men and executed thousands of its leaders, thereby removing a major obstacle to army reform
1843 Domingo Caycedo a Colombian statesman who served as Vice-president of Gran Colombia and the Republic of New Granada, and due to the absence of the presidents, he himself served as President a total of eleven times, making him the person to have served more times as President of Colombia. He is also credited for creating the Republic of New Granada after the division of Venezuela and Ecuador
1855 Antonio Rosmini-Serbati an Italian Roman Catholic priest and philosopher. He founded the Rosminians, officially the Institute of Charity or Societas a charitate nuncupata
1860 Charles Goodyear an American self-taught chemist and manufacturing engineer who invented and developed a process to vulcanize rubber in 1839, which he improved while living and working in Springfield, Massachusetts in 1844, and for which he received patent number 3633 from the United States Patent Office on June 15, 1844.
1863 John F. Reynolds a career United States Army officer and a general in the American Civil War. One of the Union Army's most respected senior commanders, he played a key role in committing the Army of the Potomac to the Battle of Gettysburg and was killed at the start of the battle
1864 Josiah Quincy III a U.S. educator and political figure. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives , Mayor of Boston , and President of Harvard University. The historic Quincy Market in downtown Boston is named in his honor
1871 Samuel Joseph May a radical American reformer during the nineteenth century, championed multiple reform movements including education, women’s rights, and abolitionism. He was born on September 12, 1797 in an upper class Boston area. May was the son of Colonel Joseph May, a merchant, and Dorothy Sewell, who was descended from or connected to many of the leading families of colonial Massachusetts, including the Quincys and the Hancocks. His sister was Abby May Alcott, mother of novelist Louisa May Alcott. In 1825, he married Lucretia Flagge Coffin with whom he had five children. The oldest died as a toddler, but May saw this event as a sacrifice he had to make for the purity of his own soul
1876 Mikhail Bakunin a Russian revolutionary anarchist, and founder of collectivist anarchism. He is considered among the most influential figures of anarchism, and one of the principal founders of the "social anarchist" tradition. Bakunin's enormous prestige as an activist made him one of the most famous ideologues in Europe, and he gained substantial influence among radicals throughout Russia and Europe
1880 Philipp Phoebus a German physician and pharmacologist.
1881 Hermann Lotze a German philosopher and logician. He also had a medical degree and was unusually well versed in biology. He argued that if the physical world is governed by mechanical laws, relations and developments in the universe could be explained as the functioning of a world mind. His medical studies were pioneering works in scientific psychology
1881 Henri Étienne Sainte-Claire Deville a French chemist.
1882 John Henry Hill a United States businessman, educator and member of the Episcopal Church, chiefly identified with teaching and missionary work in Greece.
1884 Allan Pinkerton a Scottish American detective and spy, best known for creating the Pinkerton National Detective Agency.
1884 Eduard Totleben a Baltic German military engineer and Imperial Russian Army general. He was in charge of fortification and sapping work during a number of important Russian military campaigns
1886 Otto Wilhelm Hermann von Abich a German mineralogist and geologist. Full member of St Petersburg Academy of Sciences
1889 José Joaquín Pérez a Chilean political figure. He served as the president of Chile between 1861 and 1871
1890 Adolf Ebert a Romance philologist and literary historian from Austria. He was an author of literary studies as well as a publisher of periodicals, including the Jahrbuch für Romanische und Englische Literatur
1891 Mihail Kogălniceanu a Moldavian-born Romanian liberal statesman, lawyer, historian and publicist; he became Prime Minister of Romania on October 11, 1863, after the 1859 union of the Danubian Principalities under Domnitor Alexandru Ioan Cuza, and later served as Foreign Minister under Carol He was several times Interior Minister under Cuza and Carol. A polymath, Kogălniceanu was one of the most influential Romanian intellectuals of his generation. Siding with the moderate liberal current for most of his lifetime, he began his political career as a collaborator of Prince Mihail Sturdza, while serving as head of the Iași Theater and issuing several publications together with the poet Vasile Alecsandri and the activist Ion Ghica. After editing the highly influential magazine Dacia Literară and serving as a professor at Academia Mihăileană, Kogălniceanu came into conflict with the authorities over his Romantic nationalist inaugural speech of 1843. He was the ideologue of the abortive 1848 Moldavian revolution, authoring its main document, Dorințele partidei naționale din Moldova
1894 Jean-Joseph Carriès a French sculptor, ceramist, and miniaturist. Born in Lyon, Carriès was orphaned at age six and was raised in a Roman Catholic orphanage. He apprenticed with a local sculptor then in 1874 moved to Paris to study at the École des Beaux-Arts under Augustin-Alexandre Dumont. He first showed at the Paris Salon of 1875 and gained considerable recognition for his sculpted busts at the Paris Salons of 1879 and 1881. However, after seeing an exhibition of Japanese works at the 1878 World's Fair in Paris, he began to devote himself to the creation of polychrome Horror Masks
1894 Julius van Zuylen van Nijevelt a Dutch politician.
1895 Petko Slaveykov a noted nineteenth-century Bulgarian poet, publicist, public figure and folklorist.
1896 Harriet Beecher Stowe an American abolitionist and author. Her novel Uncle Tom's Cabin was a depiction of life for African Americans under slavery; it reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential in the United States and United Kingdom. It energized anti-slavery forces in the American North, while provoking widespread anger in the South. She wrote more than 20 books, including novels, three travel memoirs, and collections of articles and letters. She was influential for both her writings and her public stands on social issues of the day