Died on July 6

649 Goar of Aquitaine a priest and hermit of the seventh century. He was offered the position of Bishop of Trier, but died before accepting the position. He is noted for his piety, and is revered as a miracle-worker. He is a patron saint of innkeepers, potters, and vine growers
918 William I Duke of Aquitaine the Count of Auvergne from 886 and Duke of Aquitaine from 893, succeeding the Poitevin ruler Ebalus Manser. He made numerous monastic foundations, most important among them the foundation of Cluny Abbey on 11 September 910
1017 Genshin the most influential of a number of Tendai scholars active during the tenth and eleventh centuries in Japan. He was not a wandering evangelist as Kūya was, but was an elite cleric who espoused a doctrine of devotion to Amida Buddha which taught that because Japan was thought to have entered mappō, the "degenerate age" of the "latter law," the only hope for salvation lay in the reliance on the power of Amitabha. Other doctrines, he claimed, could not aid an individual because they depended on "self-power" , which cannot prevail during the chaos of the degenerate age, when the power of another is necessary. In his approach to rebirth in the Pure Land, Genshin emphasized visual meditation practices, where later Pure Land sects favored verbal recitations such as the nembutsu. Genshin's doctrine is documented in his magnum opus, the Ōjōyōshū , which in later copies of the text came complete with graphic depictions of the joy of the blessed and the suffering of those doomed to chaos
1189 Henry II of England also known as Henry Curtmantle , Henry FitzEmpress or Henry Plantagenet, ruled as Count of Anjou, Count of Maine, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Nantes, King of England and Lord of Ireland; at various times, he also controlled Wales, Scotland and Brittany. Henry was the son of Geoffrey of Anjou and Matilda, daughter of Henry I of England. He became actively involved by the age of 14 in his mother's efforts to claim the throne of England, then occupied by Stephen of Blois, and was made Duke of Normandy at 17. He inherited Anjou in 1151 and shortly afterwards married Eleanor of Aquitaine, whose marriage to Louis VII of France had recently been annulled. Stephen agreed to a peace treaty after Henry's military expedition to England in 1153: Henry inherited the kingdom on Stephen's death a year later
1218 Odo III Duke of Burgundy duke of Burgundy between 1192 and 1218. Odo was the eldest son of duke Hugh III and his first wife Alice, daughter of Matthias I, Duke of Lorraine
1249 Alexander II of Scotland King of Scots from 1214 to his death.
1250 Peter I Duke of Brittany duke of Brittany jure uxoris from 1213 to 1221, then regent of the duchy from 1221 to 1237 as well as 1st Earl of Richmond from 1219 to 1235.
1325 Ismail I Sultan of Granada the grandson of Muhammed II al-Faqih and the fifth Nasrid ruler of the Moorish Emirate of Granada in Al-Andalus on the Iberian Peninsula in 1314–1325.
1415 Jan Hus a Czech priest, philosopher, reformer and master at Charles University in Prague. After John Wycliffe, the theorist of ecclesiastical Reformation, Hus is considered the first Church reformer, as he lived before Luther, Calvin and Zwingli
1476 Regiomontanus a German mathematician, astronomer, astrologer, translator, instrument maker and Catholic bishop.
1480 Antonio Squarcialupi an Italian organist and composer. He was the most famous organist in Italy in the mid-15th century
1533 Ludovico Ariosto an Italian poet. He is best known as the author of the romance epic Orlando Furioso. The poem, a continuation of Matteo Maria Boiardo's Orlando Innamorato, describes the adventures of Charlemagne, Orlando, and the Franks as they battle against the Saracens with diversions into many sideplots. Ariosto composed the poem in the ottava rima rhyme scheme and introduced narrative commentary throughout the work
1535 Thomas More an English lawyer, social philosopher, author, statesman and noted Renaissance humanist. He was an important councillor to Henry VIII and Lord Chancellor from October 1529 to 16 May 1532. More opposed the Protestant Reformation, in particular the theology of Martin Luther and William Tyndale. More also wrote Utopia, published in 1516, about the political system of an ideal and imaginary island nation. More later opposed the King's separation from the Catholic Church and refused to accept him as Supreme Head of the Church of England because it denied papal authority and he also opposed Henry's marriage to Anne Boleyn. Tried for treason, More was convicted, likely due to perjured testimony, and beheaded
1553 Edward VI of England King of England and Ireland from 28 January 1547 until his death. He was crowned on 20 February at the age of nine. The son of Henry VIII and Jane Seymour, Edward was the third monarch of the Tudor dynasty and England's first monarch raised as a Protestant. During Edward's reign, the realm was governed by a Regency Council because he never reached his majority. The Council was first led by his uncle Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset, , and then by John Dudley, 1st Earl of Warwick, from 1551 Duke of Northumberland
1571 Mōri Motonari a prominent daimyō in the west Chūgoku region of Japan during the Sengoku period of the 16th century.
1579 Takenaka Shigeharu also known as Hanbei , was a Japanese samurai during the Sengoku period of the 16th century.
1583 Edmund Grindal an English Protestant leader who successively held the posts of Bishop of London, Archbishop of York and Archbishop of Canterbury during the reign of Elizabeth I of England.
1585 Thomas Aufield an English Roman Catholic martyr.
1614 Man Singh I the Rajput Raja of Amber, a state later known as Jaipur in Rajputana. He was a trusted general of the Mughal emperor Akbar, who included him among the Navaratnas, or the 9 gems of the royal court
1641 Louis Count of Soissons Count of Soissons. He was the son of Charles de Bourbon, Count of Soissons and Anne de Montafié. He was the second cousin of King Louis XIII of France and a held the rank of prince of the blood
1684 Peter Gunning an English Royalist church leader, Bishop of Chichester and later of Ely.
1702 Nicolas Lebègue a French Baroque composer, organist and harpsichordist. He was born in Laon and in the 1650s settled in Paris, quickly establishing himself as one of the best organists of the country. He lived and worked in Paris until his death, but frequently made trips to other cities to consult on organ building and maintenance matters. Lebègue's reputation today rests on his keyboard music. He made particularly important contributions to the development of the French organ school by devising pieces with independent pedal parts and developing the Tierce en taille genre. His oeuvre also includes the earliest published unmeasured preludes, as well as some of the earliest known noëls
1711 James Douglas 2nd Duke of Queensberry a Scottish nobleman.
1743 Valentin Adamberger a German operatic tenor. His voice was universally admired for its pliancy, agility, and precision, and several composers of note, such as Mozart, wrote music specifically for him
1758 George Howe 3rd Viscount Howe a career officer and a Brigadier General in the British Army. He was described by James Wolfe as "the best officer in the British Army". He was killed in the French and Indian War in a skirmish the day before the Battle of Carillon, an ultimately disastrous attempt by the British to capture French-controlled Fort Carillon
1759 William Pepperrell a merchant and soldier in Colonial Massachusetts. He is widely remembered for organizing, financing, and leading the 1745 expedition that captured the French garrison at Fortress Louisbourg during King George's War. During his day Pepperrell was called "the hero of Louisburg," a victory celebrated in the name of Louisburg Square in Boston's Beacon Hill neighborhood
1768 Conrad Beissel the German-born religious leader who in 1732 founded the Ephrata Community in Pennsylvania, USA.
1785 Frederick August I Duke of Oldenburg the son of Christian August, Duke of Holstein-Gottorp and his wife Margravine Albertine Friederike of Baden-Durlach.
1795 Christian Gottlieb Kratzenstein a German-born doctor, physicist and engineer. From 1753 to his death he was a professor in Copenhagen, and became the rector of University of Copenhagen four times
1798 Adrien Duport a French politician, and lawyer.
1802 Daniel Morgan an American pioneer, soldier, and United States Representative from Virginia. One of the most gifted battlefield tacticians of the American Revolutionary War, he later commanded troops during the suppression of the Whiskey Rebellion
1809 Antoine Charles Louis de Lasalle a French cavalry general during the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, often called "The Hussar General". He first gained fame for his role in the Capitulation of Stettin. Over the course of his short career, he became known as a daring adventurer and was credited with many exploits. Eventually, he fought on every front and was killed at the Battle of Wagram
1813 Granville Sharp one of the first English campaigners for the abolition of the slave trade. He also involved himself in trying to correct other social injustices. Sharp formulated the plan to settle blacks in Sierra Leone, and founded the George's Bay Company, a forerunner of the Sierra Leone Company. His efforts led to both the founding of the Province of Freedom, and later on Freetown, Sierra Leone, and so he is considered to be one of the founding fathers of Sierra Leone. He was also a biblical scholar and classicist, and a talented musician
1816 Jorge Tadeo Lozano a Neogranadine scientist, journalist, and politician who presided over the Constituent College of Cundinamarca and was elected President of Cundinamarca in 1811.
1819 Sophie Blanchard a French aeronaut and the wife of ballooning pioneer Jean-Pierre Blanchard. Blanchard was the first woman to work as a professional balloonist, and after her husband's death she continued ballooning, making more than 60 ascents. Known throughout Europe for her ballooning exploits, Blanchard entertained Napoleon Bonaparte, who promoted her to the role of "Aeronaut of the Official Festivals", replacing André-Jacques Garnerin. On the restoration of the monarchy in 1814 she performed for Louis XVIII, who named her "Official Aeronaut of the Restoration"
1827 Sir Thomas Munro 1st Baronet a Scottish soldier and colonial administrator. He was an East India Company Army officer and statesman
1832 José de la Serna e Hinojosa a Spanish general and colonial official. He was the last Spanish viceroy of Peru to exercise effective power
1833 Pierre-Narcisse Guérin a French painter.
1835 Matija Čop a Slovene linguist, literary historian and critic.
1835 John Marshall the fourth Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. His court opinions helped lay the basis for United States constitutional law and made the Supreme Court of the United States a coequal branch of government along with the legislative and executive branches. Previously, Marshall had been a leader of the Federalist Party in Virginia and served in the United States House of Representatives from 1799 to 1800. He was Secretary of State under President John Adams from 1800 to 1801
1849 Goffredo Mameli a notable figure in the Italian Risorgimento. He is also the author of the lyrics of the current Italian national anthem
1851 Thomas Davenport (inventor) a Vermont blacksmith who constructed the first American DC electric motor in 1834.
1854 Georg Ohm a German physicist and mathematician. As a school teacher, Ohm began his research with the new electrochemical cell, invented by Italian scientist Alessandro Volta. Using equipment of his own creation, Ohm found that there is a direct proportionality between the potential difference applied across a conductor and the resultant electric current. This relationship is known as Ohm's law
1854 August Borsig a German businessman who founded the Borsig-Werke factory.
1855 Andrew Crosse a British amateur scientist who was born and died at Fyne Court, Broomfield, Somerset. Crosse was an early pioneer and experimenter in the use of electricity, and one of the last of the "gentlemen scientists". He became widely known after press reports of an electrocrystallization experiment he conducted in 1836, during which insects "appeared"
1861 James Forbes (botanist) a British gardener and botanist.
1863 Ernst Merck a German businessman and politician.
1865 Princess Sophie of Sweden a Swedish princess and a consort Grand Duchess of Baden.
1868 Harada Sanosuke a Japanese warrior who lived in the late Edo period. He was the 10th unit captain of the Shinsengumi, and died during the Boshin War
1869 Agoston Haraszthy a Hungarian-American traveler, writer, town-builder, and pioneer winemaker in Wisconsin and California, often referred to as the "Father of California Viticulture," or the "Father of Modern Winemaking in California". One of the first men to plant vineyards in Wisconsin, he was the founder of the Buena Vista vineyards in Sonoma, California, and an early writer on California wine and viticulture