Died on July 9

518 Anastasius I Dicorus Byzantine Emperor from 491 to 518. During his reign the Roman eastern frontier underwent extensive re-fortification, including the construction of Dara, a stronghold intended to counter the Persian fortress of Nisibis. During his reign was built one of the most fortified castle cities on the Adriatic Durrës Castle in Durrës
880 Ariwara no Narihira a Japanese waka poet and aristocrat. He was one of six waka poets referred in the preface in kana to Kokin Wakashū by Ki no Tsurayuki, and has been named as the hero of The Tales of Ise, whose hero was an anonym in itself but most of whose love affairs could be attributed to Narihira
1228 Stephen Langton Archbishop of Canterbury between 1207 and his death in 1228 and was a central figure in the dispute between King John of England and Pope Innocent III, which was a contributing factor to the crisis which led to the issuing of Magna Carta in 1215. He is also credited with having divided the Bible into the standard modern arrangement of chapters used today
1386 Leopold III Duke of Austria Duke of Austria from 1365 to 1379, and Duke of Styria, Carniola and Carinthia in 1365–1386.
1394 Nicholas III Duke of Opava Duke of Opava from 1367 to 1377 and Duke of Głubczyce from 1377 until his death.
1539 Adrian Fortescue (martyr) a courtier at the court of King Henry VIII of England who was executed in 1539 and later beatified as a Roman Catholic martyr.
1553 Maurice Elector of Saxony Duke and later Elector of Saxony. His clever manipulation of alliances and disputes gained the Albertine branch of the Wettin dynasty extensive lands and the electoral dignity
1561 Sebald Heyden a German musicologist, cantor, theologian, hymn-writer and religious poet. He is perhaps best known for his De arte canendi which is considered to have had a major impact on scholarship and the teaching of singing to young boys. It has been speculated that Heyden was the world's first true musicologist
1627 Dirk Rafaelsz Camphuysen a Dutch painter, poet and theologian.
1654 Ferdinand IV King of the Romans born in Vienna, the eldest son of Ferdinand III, Holy Roman Emperor, and his first wife, María Ana of Spain. He was made King of Bohemia in 1646 and King of Hungary in 1647, the latter coronation taking place on June 16 in Pressburg. He was elected King of the Romans, that is, heir to the Holy Roman Empire, on 31 May 1653, and crowned at Ratisbon on 18 June of the same year. He died of smallpox in Vienna, predeceasing his father and leaving his younger brother, Leopold, as heir apparent
1673 Johann Rudolph Ahle a German composer, organist, theorist, and Protestant church musician.
1677 Angelus Silesius a German Catholic priest and physician, known as a mystic and religious poet. Born and raised a Lutheran, he adopted the name Angelus and the surname Silesius on converting to Catholicism in 1653. While studying in the Netherlands, he began to read the works of medieval mystics and became acquainted with the works of the German mystic Jacob Böhme through Böhme's friend, Abraham von Franckenberg. Silesius's mystical beliefs caused tension between him and Lutheran authorities and led to his eventual conversion to Catholicism. He took holy orders under the Franciscans and was ordained a priest in 1661. Ten years later, in 1671, he retired to a Jesuit house where he remained for the rest of his life
1681 Katakura Kagenaga (2nd) a Japanese samurai of the early Edo period, who served as a senior retainer of the Date clan of Sendai han. He bore the same name as his great-grandfather. The lord of Shiroishi Castle, Kagenaga was the third bearer of the common name Kojūrō. During the Date incident , he was a caretaker for the young daimyō, Kamechiyo. Upon receiving news of the actions of Harada Munesuke, Kagenaga immediately brought the domain to emergency footing, restraining any disorder from breaking out and saving the Sendai domain from the danger of being attaindered. However, as he was sickly, he resigned his post immediately following the incident's resolution
1706 Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville a soldier, ship captain, explorer, colonial administrator, knight of the order of Saint-Louis, adventurer, privateer, trader, member of Compagnies Franches de la Marine and founder of the French colony of Louisiana of New France.
1716 Joseph Sauveur a French mathematician and physicist. He was a professor of mathematics and in 1696 became a member of the French Academy of Sciences
1727 Veronica Giuliani Saint Veronica Giuliani, O.S.C. Cap., was an Italian Capuchin nun and mystic. She was canonized by Pope Gregory XVI in 1839
1737 Gian Gastone de' Medici Grand Duke of Tuscany the seventh and last Medicean Grand Duke of Tuscany. He was the second son of Grand Duke Cosimo III and Marguerite Louise d'Orléans. His sister, Electress Palatine Anna Maria Luisa, arranged his marriage to the wealthy and widowed Anna Maria Franziska of Saxe-Lauenburg in 1697. The couple despised each other and had no children. As Grand Prince Ferdinando, Gian Gastone's elder brother, predeceased Cosimo III, Gian Gastone succeeded his father in 1723
1742 John Oldmixon an English historian.
1744 Kasper Niesiecki a Polish heraldist, Jesuit, lexicographer, writer, theologian and preacher.
1746 Philip V of Spain King of Spain from 1 November 1700 to 15 January 1724, when he abdicated in favour of his son Louis, and from 6 September 1724, when he assumed the throne again upon his son's death, to his own death.
1747 Giovanni Bononcini an Italian Baroque composer, cellist, singer and teacher, one of a family of string players and composers.
1761 Carl Gotthelf Gerlach a German organist, who took over the Leipzig Collegium Musicum from Johann Sebastian Bach between 1737 and 1739.
1766 Jonathan Mayhew a noted American minister at Old West Church, Boston, Massachusetts.
1774 Anna Morandi Manzolini an internationally known anatomist and anatomical wax modeler, as lecturer of anatomical design at the University of Bologna.
1791 Jacques-Nicolas Tardieu a French engraver.
1795 Henry Seymour Conway a British general and statesman. A brother of the 1st Marquess of Hertford, and cousin of Horace Walpole, he began his military career in the War of the Austrian Succession. He held various political offices including Chief Secretary for Ireland, Secretary of State for the Southern Department, Leader of the House of Commons and Secretary of State for the Northern Department. He eventually rose to the position of Commander-in-Chief of the Forces
1797 Edmund Burke an Irish statesman born in Dublin; author, orator, political theorist, and philosopher, who, after moving to England, served for many years in the House of Commons of Great Britain as a member of the Whig party.
1826 Charlotte von Lengefeld the wife of German poet Friedrich Schiller.
1828 Gilbert Stuart an American painter from Rhode Island.
1832 Semyon Vorontsov a Russian diplomat from the aristocratic Russian Vorontsov family, whose siblings included Alexander Vorontsov, Elizaveta Vorontsova and Yekaterina Vorontsova-Dashkova.
1834 Sir Michael Seymour 1st Baronet an officer of the Royal Navy. He served during the French Revolutionary and the Napoleonic Wars, eventually rising to the rank of Rear-Admiral
1837 Job von Witzleben a Prussian lieutenant general, adjutant-general to the king, and minister of war.
1843 Karoline Pichler an Austrian novelist. She was born in Vienna to Hofrat Franz Sales von Greiner and his wife Charlotte, née Hieronimus
1843 Washington Allston an American painter and poet, born in Waccamaw Parish, South Carolina. Allston pioneered America's Romantic movement of landscape painting. He was well known during his lifetime for his experiments with dramatic subject matter and his bold use of light and atmospheric color
1850 Zachary Taylor the 12th President of the United States, serving from March 1849 until his death in July 1850. Before his presidency, Taylor was a career officer in the United States Army, rising to the rank of major general. His status as a national hero as a result of his victories in the Mexican-American War won him election to the White House despite his vague political beliefs. His top priority as president was preserving the Union, but he died sixteen months into his term, before making any progress on the status of slavery, which had been inflaming tensions in Congress. Taylor was born to a prominent family of planters who migrated westward from Virginia to Kentucky in his youth. He was commissioned as an officer in the U.S. Army in 1808 and made a name for himself as a captain in the War of 1812. He climbed the ranks establishing military forts along the Mississippi River and entered the Black Hawk War as a colonel in 1832. His success in the Second Seminole War attracted national attention and earned him the nickname "Old Rough and Ready"
1850 Jean-Pierre Boyer one of the leaders of the Haitian Revolution, and President of Haiti from 1818 to 1843. He reunited the north and south of Haiti in 1820 and also occupied and took control of Santo Domingo, which brought all of Hispaniola under one government by 1822. Boyer managed to rule for the longest period of time of any of the revolutionary leaders of his generation
1850 Báb the founder of Bábism, and one of three central figures of the Bahá'í Faith. He was a merchant from Shiraz, Persia who, at the age of twenty-four , claimed to be an inspired interpreter of the Qur'an within the Shaykhi school of Twelver Shi'ism. He made bolder claims as time passed, and in 1847, during a trial in Tabriz, asserted a claim to be the Shi'i 'promised one' or Qá'im. After his declaration he took the title of Báb meaning "Gate" or "Door". He composed numerous letters and books in which he stated his messianic claims and defined his teachings, which constituted a new sharí'ah or religious law. His movement eventually acquired thousands of supporters, was opposed by Iran's Shi'i clergy, and was suppressed by the Iranian government, leading to the persecution and killing of between two and three thousand of his followers, called Bábís. In 1850, at the age of thirty, the Báb was shot by a firing squad in Tabriz
1852 Thomas McKean Thompson McKennan a 19th-century politician and lawyer who served as the 2nd United States Secretary of the Interior under President Millard Fillmore.
1855 William Parry (explorer) an English rear-admiral and Arctic explorer. His 1819 voyage through the Parry Channel was probably the most successful in the long quest for the Northwest Passage. In 1827 he attempted one of the earliest expeditions to the North Pole. He reached 82°45′ North latitude, setting the record for human exploration farthest North that stood for nearly five decades before being surpassed at 83°20′26″ by Albert Hastings Markham in 1875–1876
1856 Amedeo Avogadro an Italian scientist. He is most noted for his contributions to molecular theory, including what is known as Avogadro's law. In tribute to him, the number of elementary entities in 1 mole of a substance, 6.02214179×1023, is known as the Avogadro constant, one of the seven SI base units and represented by NA
1856 James Strang an American religious leader, politician and self-proclaimed monarch who founded the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints , a faction of the Latter Day Saint movement. A major contender for leadership of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints during the 1844 succession crisis, Strang vied with Brigham Young and Sidney Rigdon for control of the main body of Latter Day Saints in Nauvoo, Illinois before his rejection by that group led him to start his own sect. While serving as Prophet, Seer and Revelator of his church—which he claimed to be the sole legitimate continuation of the Church of Christ founded by Joseph Smith, in 1830—Strang reigned for six years as the crowned "king" of an ecclesiastical monarchy that he established on Beaver Island in the US state of Michigan. Building an organization that eventually rivaled Young's in Utah, Strang gained nearly 12,000 adherents prior to his murder in 1856, which brought down his kingdom and all but extinguished his sect
1863 Christian Friedrich Baron Stockmar an Anglo-Belgian statesman, who was a leading player in the affairs of the United Kingdom under Queen Victoria.
1865 Carl Rahl an Austrian painter.
1871 John Slidell an American politician, lawyer and businessman. A native of New York, Slidell moved to Louisiana as a young man and became a staunch defender of southern rights as a U.S. Representative and Senator. He was the older brother of Alexander Slidell Mackenzie, a US naval officer
1875 Christian Ruben a German painter.
1880 Paul Broca a French physician, surgeon, anatomist, and anthropologist. He was born in Sainte-Foy-la-Grande, Gironde. He is best known for his research on Broca's area, a region of the frontal lobe that has been named after him. Broca’s Area is involved with articulated language. His work revealed that the brains of patients suffering from aphasia contained lesions in a particular part of the cortex, in the left frontal region. This was the first anatomical proof of the localization of brain function. Broca's work also contributed to the development of physical anthropology, advancing the science of anthropometry
1882 Ignacio Carrera Pinto a Chilean hero of the War of the Pacific.
1883 Filippo Pacini an Italian anatomist, posthumously famous for isolating the cholera bacillus Vibrio cholerae in 1854, well before Robert Koch's more widely accepted discoveries thirty years later.
1884 Johann Peter Lange a German Calvinist theologian of peasant origin.
1894 Juventino Rosas a Mexican composer and violinist.