Died on June 15

923 Robert I of France the king of West Francia from 922 to 923. Before his succession to the kingdom he was Count of Poitiers, Count of Paris and Marquis of Neustria and Orléans. He succeeded the Carolingian king Charles the Simple, who in 898 had succeeded Robert’s brother Odo
948 Romanos I Lekapenos an Armenian who became a Byzantine naval commander and reigned as Byzantine Emperor from 920 until his deposition on December 16, 944.
991 Theophanu the niece of the Byzantine Emperor John I Tzimiskes. By her marriage with Holy Roman Emperor Otto II, she was Empress consort of the Holy Roman Empire and held regency as Empress dowager upon her husband's death in 983. Her name is derived from Medieval Greek Theophaneia , "appearance of God"
1073 Emperor Go-Sanjō the 71st emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.
1184 Magnus V of Norway a King of Norway during the Civil war era in Norway.
1189 Minamoto no Yoshitsune a general of the Minamoto clan of Japan in the late Heian and early Kamakura period. Yoshitsune was the ninth son of Minamoto no Yoshitomo, and the third and final son and child that Yoshitomo would father with Tokiwa Gozen. Yoshitsune's older brother Minamoto no Yoritomo founded the Kamakura shogunate. Yoshitsune's name in childhood was Ushiwakamaru. He is considered one of the greatest and the most popular warriors of his era, and one of the most famous samurai fighters in the history of Japan
1246 Frederick II Duke of Austria the Duke of Austria and the Duke of Styria from 1230 to his death in 1246. He was the fifth and last Duke of Austria from the House of Babenberg
1341 Andronikos III Palaiologos Byzantine emperor from 1328 to 1341. Andronikos III was the son of Michael IX Palaiologos and Rita of Armenia. He was roclaimed co-emperor in his youth, before 1313, and in April 1321 he rebelled in opposition to his grandfather, Andronikos II Palaiologos. He was formally crowned co-emperor on February 1325, before ousting his grandfather outright and becoming sole emperor on 24 May 1328. His reign saw the last failed attempts to stem the Ottoman Turks in Bithynia and the defeat at Rusokastro against the Bulgarians, but also the successful recovery of Chios, Lesbos, Phocaea, Thessaly and Epirus. His early death left a power vacuum that resulted in the disastrous seven-year civil war between his Empress-dowager, Anna of Savoy, and his closest friend and supporter, John VI Kantakouzenos
1361 Johannes Tauler a German mystic, a Catholic preacher and a theologian. A disciple of Meister Eckhart, he belonged to the Dominican order. Tauler was known as one of the most important Rhineland Mystics. He promoted a certain neo-platonist dimension in the Dominican spirituality of his time
1381 Wat Tyler a leader of the 1381 Peasants' Revolt in England. He marched a group of protesters from Canterbury to the capital to oppose the institution of a poll tax. While the brief rebellion enjoyed early success, Tyler was killed by officers of King Richard II during negotiations at Smithfield in London
1381 John Cavendish an English judge from Cavendish, Suffolk, England. He and the village gave the name Cavendish to the aristocratic families, of the Dukedoms of Devonshire, Newcastle and Portland
1383 John VI Kantakouzenos the Byzantine emperor from 1347 to 1354.
1389 Miloš Obilić an Serbian knight in the service of Prince Lazar, during the invasion of the Ottoman Empire. He is not mentioned in contemporary sources, but he features prominently in later accounts of the Serbian defeat at the Battle of Kosovo as the legendary assassin of the Ottoman sultan Murad Although he remains anonymous in the extant sources until the 18th century, the dissemination of the story of Murad's assassination in Florentine, Serbian, Ottoman and Greek sources suggests that versions of it circulated widely across the Balkans within half a century after the event
1389 Lazar of Serbia a medieval Serbian ruler, who created the largest and most powerful state on the territory of the disintegrated Serbian Empire. Lazar's state, known in historiography as Moravian Serbia, comprised the basins of the Great Morava, West Morava, and South Morava Rivers. Lazar ruled it from 1373 until his death in 1389. Lazar's political programme was the reunification of the disintegrated Serbian state under him as the direct successor of the Nemanjić dynasty, which ended in 1371 after two centuries of rule over Serbia. Lazar had a full support from the Serbian Church for this programme, but powerful Serbian nobles did not recognize him as their supreme ruler
1389 Murad I the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire, from 1362 to 1389. He was the son of Orhan and the Valide Sultan Nilüfer Hatun and became the ruler following his father's death in 1362
1416 John Duke of Berry Duke of Berry and Auvergne and Count of Poitiers and Montpensier. He was the third son of King John II of France and Bonne of Luxemburg; his brothers were King Charles V of France, Duke Louis I of Anjou and Duke Philip the Bold of Burgundy. He is primarily remembered as a collector of the important illuminated manuscripts and other works of art commissioned by him, such as the Très Riches Heures
1467 Philip the Good Duke of Burgundy as Philip III from 1419 until his death. He was a member of a cadet line of the Valois dynasty. During his reign Burgundy reached the height of its prosperity and prestige and became a leading center of the arts. Philip is known in history for his administrative reforms, patronage of Flemish artists such as Jan van Eyck, of Franco-Flemish composers such as Gilles Binchois, and the capture of Joan of Arc. During his reign he alternated between English and French alliances in an attempt to improve his dynasty's position. Moreover, as ruler of Flanders, Brabant, Limburg, Artois, Hainaut, Holland, Zeeland, Friesland and Namur, he played an important role in the history of the Low Countries
1505 Ercole I d'Este Duke of Ferrara Duke of Ferrara from 1471 until 1505. He was a member of the House of Este. He was nicknamed North Wind and the Diamond
1521 Tamás Bakócz a Hungarian archbishop, cardinal and statesman.
1545 Elizabeth of Austria (1526–1545) the eldest of fifteen children of Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor, and his wife Anna of Bohemia and Hungary. A member of the House of Habsburg, she was married off to Sigismund II Augustus, who was already crowned as King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania even though both of his parents were still alive and well. The marriage was short and unhappy. Elizabeth was of frail health, suffering from epileptic seizures, and died at age 18
1573 Antun Vrančić a Croatian prelate, writer, diplomat and Archbishop of Esztergom of the 16th century. Antun Vrančić was from Dalmatian town of Šibenik , then part of the Republic of Venice. Vrančić is also known under his Latinized name Antonius Verantius, while Hungarian documents since the 19th century refer to him as Verancsics Antal
1579 Simão Rodrigues a Portuguese Jesuit priest, , one of the co-founders of the Society of Jesus.
1587 Frederick II Duke of Holstein-Gottorp a Danish-German nobleman. He was the eldest son of Duke Adolf of Holstein-Gottorp and his wife, Christine of Hesse
1614 Henry Howard 1st Earl of Northampton a significant English aristocrat and courtier. He was suspect as a crypto-Catholic throughout his life, and went through periods of royal disfavour, in which his reputation suffered greatly. He was distinguished for learning, artistic culture and his public charities. He built Northumberland House in London and superintended the construction of the fine house of Audley End. He founded and planned several hospitals. Francis Bacon included three of his sayings in his Apophthegms, and chose him as "the learnedest councillor in the kingdom to present to the king his Advancement of Learning." Although he died before it went to trial it was discovered that he had been involved in the murder of Sir Thomas Overbury
1666 Łukasz Opaliński (1612–1666) a Polish nobleman. He was a poet, writer and political activist, one of the most important of Polish political writers of the 17th century
1669 François de Vendôme Duke of Beaufort the illegitimate grandson of Henry IV of France. He was also cousin to Louis XIV. He was a prominent figure in the Fronde, and later went on to fight in the Mediterranean. His mother was the heiress Françoise de Lorraine. He is sometimes called François de Vendôme, though he was born into the House of Bourbon, Vendôme coming from his father's title of Duke of Vendôme
1679 Guillaume Courtois a French-Italian painter and etcher, active mainly in Rome as a battle-painter and painter of sacred subjects. He was the brother of the Jesuit painter Jacques Courtois
1679 Andrzej Maksymilian Fredro a Polish szlachcic and writer.
1702 Georg Eberhard Rumphius now eastern Indonesia, and is best known for his work Herbarium Amboinense. In addition to his major contributions to plant systematics, he is also remembered for his skills as an ethnographer, and his frequent defense of Ambonese peoples against colonialism
1703 Gilles Schey a Dutch admiral.
1707 Antonio Verrio responsible for introducing Baroque mural painting into England and served the Crown over a thirty year period.
1707 Giorgio Baglivi an Italian physician and scientist, was born in poor circumstances at Ragusa in Dalmatia, his real name being Armeno. His family was of Armenian decent. His family was removed to Lecce in Apulia, and Giorgio took the name of his adopted father, a wealthy physician named Pier Angelo Baglivi. He made important contributions to clinical education, based on his own medical practice, and in De Fibra Motrice advanced the theory that the solid parts of organs are more crucial to their good functioning than their fluids
1717 Fabrizio Spada an Italian Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church, and served as Secretary of State under Pope Innocent XII.
1724 Henry Sacheverell an English High Church clergyman and politician.
1734 Giovanni Ceva an Italian mathematician widely known for proving Ceva's theorem in elementary geometry. His brother, Tommaso Ceva was also a well-known poet and mathematician
1735 René-Aubert Vertot a French historian.
1752 Charles-Antoine Coypel a French painter, art commentator, and playwright. He lived in Paris. He was the son of the artist Antoine Coypel and grandson of Noël Coypel. Charles-Antoine inherited his father’s design and painting duties as premier peintre du roi at the French court when his father died in 1722. He became premier peintre du roi and director of the Académie Royale in 1747. He received a number of commissions for paintings for the Palais de Versailles, and worked for Madame de Pompadour, the king’s mistress
1768 James Short (mathematician) a Scottish mathematician, optician and telescope maker.
1772 Louis-Claude Daquin a French composer of Jewish birth writing in the Baroque and Galant styles. He was a virtuoso organist and harpsichordist
1785 Jean-François Pilâtre de Rozier a French chemistry and physics teacher, and one of the first pioneers of aviation. He and the Marquis d'Arlandes made the first manned free balloon flight on 21 November 1783, in a Montgolfier balloon. He later died when his balloon crashed near Wimereux in the Pas-de-Calais during an attempt to fly across the English Channel. He and his companion, Pierre Romain, became the first known fatalities in an air crash
1797 Christen Friis Rottbøll a Danish physician and botanist and pupil of Carolus Linnaeus.
1812 Anton Stadler an Austrian clarinet and basset horn player for whom Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote both his Clarinet Quintet and Clarinet Concerto.
1829 Francis Buchanan-Hamilton a Scottish physician who made significant contributions as a geographer, zoologist, and botanist while living in India.
1844 Thomas Campbell (poet) a Scottish poet chiefly remembered for his sentimental poetry dealing especially with human affairs. He was also one of the initiators of a plan to found what became the University of London. In 1799, he wrote "The Pleasures of Hope", a traditional 18th century didactic poem in heroic couplets. He also produced several stirring patriotic war songs—"Ye Mariners of England", "The Soldier's Dream", "Hohenlinden" and in 1801, "The Battle of Mad and Strange Turkish Princes"
1849 James K. Polk the 11th President of the United States. Polk was born in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. He later lived in and represented Tennessee. A Democrat, Polk served as the 17th Speaker of the House of Representatives and Governor of Tennessee. Polk was the surprise candidate for president in 1844, defeating Henry Clay of the rival Whig Party by promising to annex Texas. Polk was a leader of Jacksonian Democracy during the Second Party System
1851 Jan Nepomucen Umiński a Polish military officer and a brigadier general of the Army of the Duchy of Warsaw. A veteran of the Kościuszko Uprising, Napoleonic Wars and the November Uprising, he died in exile in Wiesbaden
1858 Ary Scheffer a Dutch - French Romantic painter.
1861 Robert Froriep a German anatomist who was a native of Jena. He was the father of anatomist August von Froriep
1864 Haller Nutt an American Southern planter. He was a successful cotton planter and plantation owner in Mississippi. He developed a strain of cotton that became important commercially for the Deep South
1874 Emil Rödiger a German orientalist.