Died in June

June 10, 38 Julia Drusilla a member of the Roman imperial family, the second daughter and fifth child to survive infancy of Germanicus and Agrippina the Elder, and sister of the Emperor Caligula. Drusilla also had two sisters and two other brothers. She was also a great-granddaughter of the Emperor Augustus, grand-niece of the Emperor Tiberius, niece of the Emperor Claudius, and aunt of the Emperor Nero
June 9, 68 Nero Roman Emperor from 54 to 68, and the last in the Julio-Claudian dynasty. Nero was adopted by his great-uncle Claudius to become his heir and successor, and succeeded to the throne in 54 following Claudius' death
June 23, 79 Vespasian Roman Emperor from AD 69 to AD 79. Vespasian founded the Flavian dynasty that ruled the Empire for twenty seven years. Vespasian was from an equestrian family that rose into the senatorial rank under the Julio–Claudian emperors. Although he fulfilled the standard succession of public offices, and held the consulship in AD 51, Vespasian's renown came from his military success: he was legate of Legio II Augusta during the Roman invasion of Britain in 43 and subjugated Judaea during the Jewish rebellion of 66
June 28, 106 Pope Kedron of Alexandria 4th Pope of Alexandria & Patriarch of the See of Mark. When the priest and Bishops who served in the country learned that the Bishop Avilius, Patriarch of Alexandria had died, they grieved greatly and they gathered in the city of Alexandria to consult with the Christian people there, and they cast the ballot to find out who deserved to sit on the Throne of Alexandria. They all agreed, with the confirmation of God, to elect a righteous man named Kedronos. It was said that he was among those who had been baptized by Saint Mark, and he was enthroned Patriarch in the month of Babab , in the year 96 AD, during the reign of the Roman Emperor Trajan
June 26, 116 Ptolemy VIII Physcon a king of the Ptolemaic dynasty in Egypt.
June 1, 193 Didius Julianus Roman Emperor for nine weeks during the year 193.
June 1, 195 Emperor Gaozu of Han the founder and first emperor of the Han dynasty. He ruled China from 202–195 He was one of the few dynasty founders in Chinese history who emerged from the peasant class. Liu Bang initially served as a minor patrol officer in his hometown, Pei County , under the Qin dynasty. Sometime in the 210s or 200s BC, he rebelled against the Qin government by releasing a group of convicts he was escorting to Mount Li to construct Qin Shi Huang's mausoleum, after which he and his followers became outlaws and took shelter on Mount Mangdang. In 208 BC, when rebellions erupted throughout China to overthrow the Qin Empire, Liu Bang formed his own army and participated in the insurrection. He gave himself the title "Duke of Pei" and emerged as one of the most prominent rebel leaders after taking control of Pei County and some counties. After the fall of Qin in 206 BC, Xiang Yu, the de facto chief of the rebel forces, divided the former Qin Empire into the Eighteen Kingdoms. He declared himself the king of Western Chu and appointed 17 former rebel leaders – including Liu Bang – as the rulers of the other kingdoms. Liu Bang was the "King of Han" and his domain was in the remote Bashu region. Later that year, Liu Bang led his forces out of Bashu and attacked and conquered the Three Qins, three of the Eighteen Kingdoms which were nearest to his domain. From 206–202 BC, Liu Bang engaged Xiang Yu in a long power struggle, historically known as the Chu–Han Contention, for supremacy over China, while concurrently invading and subjugating the other kingdoms. In 202 BC, the war concluded with victory for Liu Bang, who succeeded in unifying most of China under his control. Liu Bang established the Han dynasty and was proclaimed Emperor that year. During his reign, Liu Bang reduced taxes and corvée, promoted Confucianism, and suppressed revolts by the rulers of some vassal states, among other things. He also initiated the policy of heqin to maintain peace between the Han Empire and the Xiongnu after he lost to the Xiongnu at the Battle of Baideng in 200 Liu Bang died in 195 BC and was succeeded by his son, Liu Ying
June 28, 202 Yuan Shao a warlord who lived in the late Eastern Han Dynasty. He occupied the northern territories of China during the civil war that occurred towards the end of the Han Dynasty and the beginning of the Three Kingdoms era. He was also an elder half-brother of Yuan Shu, a warlord who controlled the Huai River region, though the two were not on good terms with each other
June 22, 209 Saint Alban venerated as the first recorded British Christian martyr, and is considered to be the British protomartyr. Along with his fellow saints "Amphibalus," Julius, and Aaron, Alban is one of four named martyrs recorded from Roman Britain. He is traditionally believed to have been beheaded in the Roman city of Verulamium sometime during the 3rd or 4th century, and his cult has been celebrated there since ancient times
June 13, 220 Xiahou Dun a military general serving under the warlord Cao Cao in the late Eastern Han dynasty. He served for a few months under Cao Cao's successor, Cao Pi, before his death. As one of Cao Cao's most trusted generals, Xiahou Dun aided the warlord in his campaigns against Lü Bu, Liu Bei, Sun Quan and others
June 10, 223 Liu Bei a warlord in the late Eastern Han dynasty who founded the state of Shu Han in the Three Kingdoms period and became its first ruler. Despite having a later start than his rivals and lacking both the material resources and social status they commanded, Liu Bei overcame his many defeats to carve out his own realm, which at its peak spanned present-day Sichuan, Chongqing, Guizhou, Hunan, parts of Hubei, and parts of Gansu
June 29, 226 Cao Pi the first emperor of the state of Cao Wei in the Three Kingdoms period. He was born in Qiao as the second son of Cao Cao, a warlord who lived in the late Eastern Han Dynasty. However, he was the eldest son among all the children born to Cao Cao by his concubine Lady Bian. Of all his brothers, Cao Pi was the shrewdest. Instead of focusing on academic studies or administering military affairs, he was always in the presence of court officials in order to gain their support. He was mostly in charge of defence at the start of his career. After the defeat of Cao Cao's rival Yuan Shao at the Battle of Guandu, he took the widow of Yuan Shao's son Yuan Xi, Lady Zhen, as a concubine, but in 221 Lady Zhen died and Guo Nüwang became empress
June 13, 293 Aquilina a Christian child saint from Byblos.
June 5, 301 Sima Lun titled the Prince of Zhao and the usurper of the Jin Dynasty from February 3 to May 30, 301. He is usually not counted in the list of Jin emperors due to his brief reign, and was often mentioned by historians as an example of a wicked usurper. He was the third of the eight princes commonly associated with the War of the Eight Princes
June 25, 304 Amphibalus venerated as the early Christian priest who converted Saint Alban to Christianity. Alban sheltered the priest from religious persecution for a number of days, during which time Alban was so impressed with the priest's faith and teaching that Alban began to emulate him in worship, and became a Christian. When Roman soldiers came to seize the priest, Alban put on the priest's clothing and cloak, and went with the soldiers in the priest's stead. After Alban's martyrdom, Amphibalus escaped, but was eventually caught and also martyred
June 11, 323 Alexander the Great a King of the Ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon and a member of the Argead dynasty. Born in Pella in 356 BC, Alexander succeeded his father, Philip II, to the throne at the age of twenty. He spent most of his ruling years on an unprecedented military campaign through Asia and northeast Africa, until by the age of thirty he had created one of the largest empires of the ancient world, stretching from Greece to Egypt and into northwest ancient India. He was undefeated in battle and is considered one of history's most successful military commanders
June 30, 350 Nepotianus a member of the Constantinian dynasty who reigned as a short-lived usurper of the Roman Empire. He ruled the city of Rome for twenty-eight days, before being killed by his rival usurper Magnentius' general Marcellinus
June 1, 352 Ran Min a military leader during the era of Sixteen Kingdoms in China and the only emperor of the short-lived state Ran Wei. Ran is an uncommon Chinese family name. He was known for committing the genocide of the Jie people under Later Zhao
June 26, 363 Julian (emperor) Roman Emperor from 361 to 363 and a noted philosopher and Greek writer.
June 9, 373 Ephrem the Syrian a Syriac deacon and a prolific Syriac-language hymnographer and theologian of the 4th century from the region of Syria. His works are hailed by Christians throughout the world, and many denominations venerate him as a saint. He has been declared a Doctor of the Church in Roman Catholicism. He is especially beloved in the Syriac Orthodox Church
June 22, 431 Paulinus of Nola a Latin poet and letter-writer, and a convert to the Christian faith. His renunciation of wealth and a senatorial career in favour of a Christian ascetic and philanthropic life was held up as an example by many of his contemporaries, including Augustine, Jerome, Martin of Tours, and Ambrose. After his conversion he wrote to his friend and teacher, the poet Ausonius, affirming his friendship but insisting on the priorities of his new life. He and his wife settled at Nola near Naples, where he wrote poems in honor of Felix and corresponded with Christian leaders throughout the Roman Empire. After his wife's death he became Bishop of Nola, and was invited to help resolve the disputed election of Pope Boniface I
June 20, 537 Pope Silverius Pope from 8 June 536 to his deposition in 537, a few months before his death.
June 28, 548 Theodora (wife of Justinian I) empress of the Byzantine empire and the wife of Emperor Justinian She was one of the more influential and powerful empresses of the Byzantine empire. Some sources mention her as empress regnant with Justinian I as her co-regent
June 7, 555 Pope Vigilius Pope from 29 March 537 to his death in 555. He is considered the first pope of the Byzantine Papacy
June 22, 567 Pope Theodosius I of Alexandria the last Patriarch of Alexandria recognised by both Copts and Melchites.
June 28, 572 Alboin king of the Lombards from about 560 until 572. During his reign the Lombards ended their migrations by settling in Italy, the northern part of which Alboin conquered between 569 and 572. He had a lasting effect on Italy and the Pannonian Basin; in the former his invasion marked the beginning of centuries of Lombard rule, and in the latter his defeat of the Gepids and his departure from Pannonia ended the dominance there of the Germanic peoples
June 9, 597 Columba an Irish abbot and missionary credited with spreading Christianity in present-day Scotland. He founded the important abbey on Iona, which became a dominant religious and political institution in the region for centuries. He is the Patron Saint of Derry. He was highly regarded by both the Gaels of Dál Riata and the Picts, and is remembered today as a Christian saint and one of the Twelve Apostles of Ireland
June 3, 618 Kevin of Glendalough an Irish saint who was known as the founder and first abbot of Glendalough in County Wicklow, Ireland. His feast day in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches is 3 June
June 19, 626 Soga no Umako believed to be the tomb of Soga no Umako. Soga no Umako was the son of Soga no Iname and a member of the powerful Soga clan of Japan
June 17, 629 Shahrbaraz king of the Sasanian Empire from 27 April 629 to 17 June 629. He usurped the throne from Ardashir III, and was killed by Sasanian nobles after forty days. Before usurping the Sasanian throne he was a general under Khosrau His name Shahrbaraz is actually an honorific title, and means "the Boar of the Empire", attesting to his dexterity in military command and his warlike person, as the boar was the animal associated with the Zoroastrian Izad Vahram, the epitome of victory
June 8, 632 Muhammad full name Abū al-Qāsim Muḥammad ibn ʿAbd Allāh ibn ʿAbd al-Muṭṭalib ibn Hāshim , from Mecca, unified Arabia into a single religious polity under Islam. Believed by Muslims as well as Bábists and Bahá'ís to be a messenger and prophet of God, Muhammad is almost universally considered by Muslims as the last prophet sent by God to mankind. While non-Muslims generally regard Muhammad as the founder of Islam, Muslims consider him to have restored the unaltered original monotheistic faith of Adam, Abraham, Moses, Jesus, and other prophets in Islam. Muslims discuss Muhammad and other prophets of God with reverence, adding the phrase "peace be upon them" whenever their names are mentioned
June 25, 635 Emperor Gaozu of Tang the founder of the Tang Dynasty of China, and the first emperor of this dynasty from 618 to 626. Under the Sui dynasty, Li Yuan was the governor in the area of modern-day Shanxi, and was based in Taiyuan
June 17, 656 Uthman a companion of the Islamic prophet Muhammad, and the third of the Sunni Rashidun or "Rightly Guided Caliphs". Born into a prominent Meccan clan of the Quraysh tribe, he played a major role in early Islamic history, succeeding Umar ibn al-Khattab as caliph at age 65. He was also the prophet's son-in-law twice, being married to two of the prophet’s daughters Ruqayyah and Umm Kulthum
June 1, 657 Pope Eugene I Pope from 10 August 654 to his death in 657. He was a native of Rome, born to one Rufinianus
June 17, 676 Pope Adeodatus II Pope from 11 April 672 to his death in 676. Little is known about him. Most surviving records indicate that Adeodatus was known for his generosity, especially when it came to the poor and to pilgrims
June 23, 679 Æthelthryth the name for the Anglo-Saxon saint known, particularly in a religious context, as Etheldreda or Audrey. She was an East Anglian princess, a Fenland and Northumbrian queen and Abbess of Ely
June 28, 683 Pope Leo II reigned from 17 August 682 to his death in 683.
June 6, 696 Claudius of Besançon a priest, monk, abbot, and bishop. A native of Franche-Comté, Claudius became a priest at Besançon and later a monk. Georges Goyau in the Catholic Encyclopedia wrote that “The Life of Claudius, Abbot of Condat, has been the subject of much controversy.” Anglican Henry Wace has written that "on this saint the inventors of legends have compiled a vast farrago of improbabilities."
June 5, 708 Jacob of Edessa one of the most distinguished of Syriac writers.
June 30, 710 Saint Erentrude a virgin saint of the Roman Catholic Church and was the niece of Saint Rupert of Salzburg. Her date and place of birth are unknown, but it may be presumed that she was born in present-day Germany or Austria, in the latter part of the 7th century. She followed her uncle from Worms to Salzburg, where she was installed by him as the first abbess of Nonnberg Abbey. She died on 30 June 710, the same year as Saint Rupert
June 18, 741 Leo III the Isaurian Byzantine Emperor from 717 until his death in 741. He put an end to a period of instability, successfully defended the Empire against the invading Umayyads, and forbade the veneration of icons
June 5, 754 Saint Boniface a leading figure in the Anglo-Saxon mission to the German parts of the Frankish Empire during the 8th century. He established the first organized Christianity in many parts of Germany. He is the patron saint of Germany, the first archbishop of Mainz and the "Apostle of the Germans". He was killed in Frisia in 754, along with 52 others. His remains were returned to Fulda, where they rest in a sarcophagus which became a site of pilgrimage. Facts about Boniface's life and death as well as his work became widely known, since there is a wealth of material available—a number of vitae, especially the near-contemporary Vita Bonifatii auctore Willibaldi, and legal documents, possibly some sermons, and above all his correspondence
June 10, 754 As-Saffah the first caliph of the Abbasid caliphate, one of the longest and most important caliphates in Islamic history.
June 4, 756 Emperor Shōmu the 45th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.
June 28, 767 Pope Paul I Pope from 29 May 757 to his death in 767. He first served as a Roman deacon and was frequently employed by his brother, Pope Stephen II, in negotiations with the Lombard kings
June 14, 772 Abū Ḥanīfa the founder of the Sunni Hanafi school of fiqh. He is also considered a renowned Islamic scholar and personality by Zaydi Shia Muslims. He was often called "the Great Imam"
June 3, 800 Staurakios (eunuch) a Byzantine eunuch official, who rose to be one of the most important and influential associates of Byzantine empress Irene of Athens. He effectively acted as chief minister during her regency for her young son, Emperor Constantine VI in 780–790, until overthrown and exiled by a military revolt in favour of the young emperor in 790. Restored to power by Constantine along with Irene in 792, Staurakios aided her in the eventual removal, blinding, and possible murder of her son in 797. His own position thereafter was threatened by the rise of another powerful eunuch, Aetios. Their increasing rivalry, and Staurakios's own imperial ambitions, were only resolved by Staurakios's death
June 24, 803 Higbald of Lindisfarne Bishop of Lindisfarne from 780 until his death on 24 June 803. Powicke gives his death date as 25 May 802. Little is known about his life except that he was a regular communicator with Alcuin of York; it is in his letters to Alcuin that Higbald described in graphic detail the Viking raid on Lindisfarne on 8 January 793 in which many of his monks were killed
June 14, 809 Ōtomo no Otomaro a Japanese general of the Nara period and of the early Heian period. He was the first to hold the title of seii taishōgun. Some believe he was born in 727. His father was Ōtomo no Koshibi
June 17, 811 Sakanoue no Tamuramaro a general and shogun of the early Heian Period of Japan. He was the son of Sakanoue no Karitamaro