March 16 in history

March 16 events chronologically

455 Emperor Valentinian III is assassinated by two Hunnic retainers while training with the bow on the Campus Martius (Rome)
934 Meng Zhixiang declares himself emperor and establishes Later Shu as a new state independent of Later Tang
1190 Massacre of Jews at Clifford's Tower, York
1244 Over 200 Cathars are burned after the Fall of Montségur
1322 The Battle of Boroughbridge take place in the Despenser Wars
1621 Samoset, a Mohegan, visited the settlers of Plymouth Colony and greets them, "Welcome, Englishmen! My name is Samoset."
1660 The Long Parliament of England is dissolved so as to prepare for the new Convention Parliament

Top 7 most famous people born on March 16

1751 James Madison an American statesman, political theorist and the fourth President of the United States. He is hailed as the "Father of the Constitution" for being instrumental in the drafting of the United States Constitution and as the key champion and author of the United States Bill of Rights. He served as a politician much of his adult life
1789 Georg Ohm a German physicist and mathematician. As a school teacher, Ohm began his research with the new electrochemical cell, invented by Italian scientist Alessandro Volta. Using equipment of his own creation, Ohm found that there is a direct proportionality between the potential difference applied across a conductor and the resultant electric current. This relationship is known as Ohm's law
1839 Sully Prudhomme a French poet and essayist, and was the first ever winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature, in 1901.
1912 Pat Nixon the wife of Richard Nixon, 37th President of the United States, and thus First Lady of the United States from 1969 to 1974.
1953 Richard Stallman a software freedom activist and computer programmer. He campaigns for software to be distributed in a manner such that its users receive the freedoms to use, study, distribute and modify that software. Software that ensures these freedoms is termed free software. He is best known for launching the GNU Project, founding the Free Software Foundation, developing the GNU Compiler Collection and GNU Emacs, and writing the GNU General Public License
1959 Jens Stoltenberg a Norwegian politician who is the 13th Secretary General of NATO. He served as Prime Minister of Norway from 2000 to 2001 and again from 2005 to 2013. In March 2014, Stoltenberg was appointed by NATO's North Atlantic Council to be the treaty organization's secretary general and chairman of the North Atlantic Council, succeeding Anders Fogh Rasmussen. Stoltenberg assumed his position on 1 October 2014
1989 Theo Walcott an English professional footballer who plays as a forward for Arsenal and the England national team. Walcott won the BBC Young Sports Personality of the Year Award in 2006

Top 7 most famous people died on March 16

455 Valentinian III Western Roman Emperor from 425 to 455. His reign was marked by the ongoing dismemberment of the Western Empire
1930 Miguel Primo de Rivera a dictator, aristocrat, and military officer who served as Prime Minister of Spain from 1923 to 1930 during Spain's Restoration era. He deeply believed that it was the politicians who had ruined Spain and that governing without them he could restore the nation. His slogan was "Country, Religion, Monarchy." Historians depict him as an inept dictator who lacked clear ideas and political acumen, and who alienated his potential supporters such as the Army. He did not create a base of support among the voters, and depended instead on elite elements. His actions discredited the king and ruined the monarchy, while heightening social tensions that led in 1936 to a full-scale Spanish Civil War
1935 John James Rickard Macleod a Scottish biochemist and physiologist. He devoted his career to diverse topics in physiology and biochemistry, but was chiefly interested in carbohydrate metabolism. He is noted for his role in the discovery and isolation of insulin during his tenure as a lecturer at the University of Toronto, for which he and Frederick Banting received the 1923 Nobel prize in Physiology or Medicine. Awarding the prize to Macleod was controversial at the time, because according to Banting's version of events, Macleod's role in the discovery was negligible. It was not until decades after the events that an independent review acknowledged a far greater role than was attributed to him at first
1940 Selma Lagerlöf a Swedish author. She was the first female writer to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, and most widely known for her children's book Nils Holgerssons underbara resa genom Sverige
1957 Constantin Brâncuși a Romanian sculptor, painter and photographer who made his career in France. Considered a pioneer of modernism, one of the most influential sculptors of the 20th-century, Brâncuși is called the patriarch of modern sculpture. As a child he displayed an aptitude for carving wooden farm tools. Formal studies took him first to Bucharest, then to Munich, then to the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris from 1905 to 1907. His art emphasizes clean geometrical lines that balance forms inherent in his materials with the symbolic allusions of representational art. Brancusi sought inspiration in non-European cultures as a source of primitive exoticism, as did Paul Gauguin, Pablo Picasso, André Derain and others. But other influences emerge from Romanian folk art traceable through Byzantine and Dionysian traditions
1979 Jean Monnet a French political economist and diplomat. He is regarded by many as a chief architect of European unity and one of the founding fathers of the European Union. Never elected to public office, Monnet worked behind the scenes of American and European governments as a well-connected pragmatic internationalist. He was named patron of the 1980-1981 academic year at the College of Europe, in honour of his accomplishments
2003 Rachel Corrie an American peace activist and diarist. She was a member of the pro-Palestinian group called the International Solidarity Movement. She was killed by an Israel Defense Forces armored bulldozer in a combat zone in Rafah, in the southern part of the Gaza Strip, under contested circumstances during the height of the second Palestinian intifada