March 22 in history

March 22 events chronologically

238 Gordian I and his son Gordian II are proclaimed Roman Emperors
871 Æthelred of Wessex defeats a Danish invasion army at the Battle of Marton
1508 Ferdinand II of Aragon commissions Amerigo Vespucci chief navigator of the Spanish Empire
1621 The Pilgrims of Plymouth Colony sign a peace treaty with Massasoit of the Wampanoags
1622 Jamestown massacre: Algonquian Indians kill 347 English settlers around Jamestown, Virginia, a third of the colony's population, during the Second Anglo-Powhatan War
1630 The Massachusetts Bay Colony outlaws the possession of cards, dice, and gaming tables
1638 Anne Hutchinson is expelled from Massachusetts Bay Colony for religious dissent

Top 7 most famous people born on March 22

1459 Maximilian I Holy Roman Emperor King of the Romans from 1486 and Holy Roman Emperor from 1508 until his death, though he was never in fact crowned by the Pope, the journey to Rome always being too risky. He had ruled jointly with his father for the last ten years of his father's reign, from 1483. He expanded the influence of the House of Habsburg through war and his marriage in 1477 to Mary of Burgundy, the heiress to the Duchy of Burgundy, but he also lost the Austrian territories in today's Switzerland to the Swiss Confederacy
1599 Anthony van Dyck a Flemish Baroque artist who became the leading court painter in England, after enjoying great success in Italy and Flanders. He is most famous for his portraits of Charles I of England and his family and court, painted with a relaxed elegance that was to be the dominant influence on English portrait-painting for the next 150 years. He also painted biblical and mythological subjects, displayed outstanding facility as a draftsman, and was an important innovator in watercolour and etching
1868 Robert Andrews Millikan an American experimental physicist honored with the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1923 for his measurement of the elementary electronic charge and for his work on the photoelectric effect.
1930 Stephen Sondheim an American composer and lyricist known for his immense contributions to musical theatre for over 50 years. He is the winner of an Academy Award, eight Tony Awards including the Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Theatre, eight Grammy Awards, a Pulitzer Prize and the Laurence Olivier Award. Described by Frank Rich of The New York Times as "now the greatest and perhaps best-known artist in the American musical theater", his most famous works include A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Company, Follies, A Little Night Music, Sweeney Todd, Sunday in the Park with George and Into the Woods. He also wrote the lyrics for West Side Story and Gypsy
1931 William Shatner a Canadian actor, singer, author, film director, spokesman, and comedian. He gained worldwide fame and became a cultural icon for his portrayal of James Kirk, Captain of the United Federation of Planets starship USS Enterprise, in the science fiction television series Star Trek , Star Trek: The Animated Series , and in seven of the subsequent Star Trek feature films. He has written a series of books chronicling his experiences playing Captain Kirk and being a part of Star Trek, and has co-written several novels set in the Star Trek universe. He has also written a series of science fiction novels called TekWar which was adapted for television
1948 Andrew Lloyd Webber an English composer and impresario of musical theatre.
1976 Reese Witherspoon an American actress and producer. Witherspoon landed her first feature role as the female lead in the film The Man in the Moon in 1991. In 1996, she appeared in Freeway, and starred in Pleasantville in 1998. For her role in 1999's Election, she earned a Golden Globe nomination

Top 7 most famous people died on March 22

542 Benedict of Nursia a Christian saint, honoured by the Catholic Church and the Anglican Church as the patron saint of Europe and students.
1687 Jean-Baptiste Lully an Italian-born French composer, instrumentalist, and dancer who spent most of his life working in the court of Louis XIV of France. He is considered the chief master of the French baroque style. Lully disavowed any Italian influence in French music of the period. He became a French subject in 1661
1758 Jonathan Edwards (theologian) a Christian preacher, philosopher, and theologian. Edwards "is widely acknowledged to be America's most important and original philosophical theologian," and one of America's greatest intellectuals. Edwards's theological work is broad in scope, but he was rooted in Reformed theology, the metaphysics of theological determinism, and the Puritan heritage. Recent studies have emphasized how thoroughly Edwards grounded his life's work on conceptions of beauty, harmony, and ethical fittingness, and how central The Enlightenment was to his mindset. Edwards played a critical role in shaping the First Great Awakening, and oversaw some of the first revivals in 1733–35 at his church in Northampton, Massachusetts
1820 Stephen Decatur a United States naval officer and Commodore notable for his many naval victories in the early 19th century.
1832 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe a German writer and statesman. His body of work includes epic and lyric poetry written in a variety of metres and styles; prose and verse dramas; memoirs; an autobiography; literary and aesthetic criticism; treatises on botany, anatomy, and colour; and four novels. In addition, numerous literary and scientific fragments, more than 10,000 letters, and nearly 3,000 drawings by him are extant
2004 Ahmed Yassin a Palestinian imam and politician. He was a founder of Hamas, an Islamist Palestinian paramilitary organization and political party. Yassin also served as the spiritual leader of the organization. Hamas gained popularity in Palestinian society by establishing hospitals, education systems, libraries and other services, but it has also claimed responsibility for a number of suicide attacks targeting Israeli civilians, leading to its designation as a terrorist organization by the European Union, Israel, Japan, Canada, and the United States
2005 Kenzō Tange a Japanese architect, and winner of the 1987 Pritzker Prize for architecture. He was one of the most significant architects of the 20th century, combining traditional Japanese styles with modernism, and designed major buildings on five continents. Tange was also an influential patron of the Metabolist movement. He said: "It was, I believe, around 1959 or at the beginning of the sixties that I began to think about what I was later to call structuralism", , a reference to the architectural movement known as Dutch Structuralism