March 29 in history

March 29 events chronologically

502 King Gundobad issues a new legal code (Lex Burgundionum) at Lyon that makes Gallo-Romans and Burgundians subject to the same laws
1430 The Ottoman Empire under Murad II captures the Byzantine city of Thessalonica
1461 Wars of the Roses: Battle of Towton – Edward of York defeats Queen Margaret to become King Edward IV of England
1500 Cesare Borgia is given the title of Captain General and Gonfalonier by his father Rodrigo Borgia after returning from his conquests in the Romagna
1549 The city of Salvador da Bahia, the first capital of Brazil, is founded
1632 Treaty of Saint-Germain is signed returning Quebec to French control after the English had seized it in 1629
1638 Swedish colonists establish the first European settlement in Delaware, naming it New Sweden

Top 7 most famous people born on March 29

1790 John Tyler the tenth President of the United States. He was elected vice president on the 1840 Whig ticket with William Henry Harrison, and became president after his running mate's death in April 1841. Tyler was known as a supporter of states' rights, which endeared him to his fellow Virginians, yet his acts as president showed that he was willing to support nationalist policies as long as they did not infringe on the rights of the states. Still, the circumstances of his unexpected rise to the presidency and his possible threat to the ambitions of other potential presidential candidates left him estranged from both major parties in Washington. A firm believer in manifest destiny, President Tyler sought to strengthen and preserve the Union through territorial expansion, most notably the annexation of the independent Republic of Texas in his last days in office
1899 Lavrentiy Beria a Soviet politician, Marshal of the Soviet Union and state security administrator, chief of the Soviet security and secret police apparatus under Joseph Stalin during World War II, and Deputy Premier in the postwar years.
1902 William Walton an English composer. During a sixty-year career, he wrote music in several classical genres and styles, from film scores to opera. His best-known works include Façade, the cantata Belshazzar's Feast, the Viola Concerto and the First Symphony
1943 John Major a British Conservative politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and Leader of the Conservative Party from 1990 to 1997. He previously held the posts of Chancellor of the Exchequer and Foreign Secretary in the Thatcher Government and was the Member of Parliament for Huntingdon from 1979 to 2001. Major was Margaret Thatcher's preferred choice as her successor. Within weeks of becoming Prime Minister, Major presided over British participation in the Gulf War in March 1991 and claimed to have negotiated "Game, Set and Match for Britain" at negotiations over the Maastricht Treaty in December 1991. Despite the British economy being in recession, he went on to lead the Conservatives to a fourth consecutive election victory, winning the most votes in British electoral history with over 14 million in the 1992 general election albeit with a much reduced majority in the House of Commons. He remains to date the last Conservative Leader to win an outright majority at a general election
1943 Vangelis a Greek composer of electronic, progressive, ambient, jazz, pop rock, and orchestral music. He is best known for his Academy Award–winning score for the film Chariots of Fire, composing scores for the films Antarctica, Blade Runner, 1492: Conquest of Paradise, and Alexander, and the use of his music in the PBS documentary Cosmos: A Personal Voyage by Carl Sagan
1968 Lucy Lawless a New Zealand actress, activist and musician best known for playing the title character of the internationally successful television series Xena: Warrior Princess.
1973 Marc Overmars a Dutch former footballer who is the director of football at Ajax. Throughout his footballing career, he played as a winger and was renowned for his speed

Top 7 most famous people died on March 29

1772 Emanuel Swedenborg a Swedish scientist, philosopher, theologian, revelator, and mystic. He is best known for his book on the afterlife, Heaven and Hell
1792 Gustav III of Sweden King of Sweden from 1771 until his death.
1888 Charles-Valentin Alkan a French composer and pianist. At the height of his fame in the 1830s and 1840s he was, alongside his friends and colleagues Frédéric Chopin and Franz Liszt, among the leading virtuoso pianists in Paris, a city in which he spent virtually his entire life
1891 Georges Seurat a French Post-Impressionist painter and draftsman.
1912 Robert Falcon Scott a British Royal Navy officer and explorer who led two expeditions to the Antarctic regions: the Discovery Expedition, 1901–04, and the ill-fated Terra Nova Expedition, 1910–13. On the first expedition, he discovered the Polar Plateau, on which the South Pole is located. During the second venture, Scott led a party of five which reached the South Pole on 17 January 1912, only to find that they had been preceded by Roald Amundsen's Norwegian expedition. On their return journey, Scott's party discovered plant fossils, proving Antarctica was once forested and joined to other continents. At a distance of 150 miles from their base camp and 11 miles from the next depot, Scott and his companions died from a combination of exhaustion, starvation and extreme cold
1982 Walter Hallstein a German academic, diplomat, and politician, the first president of the Commission of the European Economic Community and one of the founding fathers of the European Union.
1982 Carl Orff a 20th-century German composer, best known for his cantata Carmina Burana. In addition to his career as a composer, Orff developed an influential approach toward music education for children