March 3 in history

March 3 events chronologically

473 Gundobad (nephew of Ricimer) nominates Glycerius as emperor of the Western Roman Empire
724 Empress Genshō abdicates the throne in favor of her nephew Shōmu who becomes emperor of Japan
1284 The Statute of Rhuddlan incorporates the Principality of Wales into England
1575 Indian Mughal Emperor Akbar defeats Bengali army at the Battle of Tukaroi
1585 The Olympic Theatre, designed by Andrea Palladio, is inaugurated in Vicenza
1776 American Revolutionary War: The first amphibious landing of the United States Marine Corps begins the Battle of Nassau
1779 American Revolutionary War: The Continental Army is routed at the Battle of Brier Creek near Savannah, Georgia

Top 7 most famous people born on March 3

1756 William Godwin an English journalist, political philosopher and novelist. He is considered one of the first exponents of utilitarianism, and the first modern proponent of anarchism. Godwin is most famous for two books that he published within the space of a year: An Enquiry Concerning Political Justice, an attack on political institutions, and Things as They Are; or, The Adventures of Caleb Williams, which attacks aristocratic privilege, but also is the first mystery novel. Based on the success of both, Godwin featured prominently in the radical circles of London in the 1790s. In the ensuing conservative reaction to British radicalism, Godwin was attacked, in part because of his marriage to the pioneering feminist writer Mary Wollstonecraft in 1797 and his candid biography of her after her death; their daughter, Mary Godwin would go on to write Frankenstein and marry the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. Godwin wrote prolifically in the genres of novels, history and demography throughout his lifetime. With his second wife, Mary Jane Clairmont, he wrote children's primers on Biblical and classical history, which he published along with such works as Charles and Mary Lamb's Tales from Shakespeare. Using the pseudonym Edward Baldwin, he wrote a variety of books for children, including a version of Jack and the Beanstalk. He also has had considerable influence on British literature and literary culture
1845 Georg Cantor a German mathematician, best known as the inventor of set theory, which has become a fundamental theory in mathematics. Cantor established the importance of one-to-one correspondence between the members of two sets, defined infinite and well-ordered sets, and proved that the real numbers are "more numerous" than the natural numbers. In fact, Cantor's method of proof of this theorem implies the existence of an "infinity of infinities". He defined the cardinal and ordinal numbers and their arithmetic. Cantor's work is of great philosophical interest, a fact of which he was well aware
1847 Alexander Graham Bell credited with inventing the first practical telephone.
1911 Jean Harlow an American film actress and sex symbol of the 1930s.
1930 Ion Iliescu a Romanian politician and statesman, who served as President of Romania from 1989 until 1996, and from 2000 until 2004. From 1996 to 2000 and from 2004 until his retirement in 2008, Iliescu was a senator for the Social Democratic Party , whose honorary president he remains
1953 Zico a Brazilian coach and former footballer. Often called the "White Pelé", he is considered one of the most skilled finishers and best passers ever. Arguably the world's best player of the late 1970s and early 80s, he is regarded as one of the best playmakers and free kick specialists, able to bend the ball in all directions. In 1999, Zico came eighth in the FIFA Player of the Century grand jury vote, and in 2004 was named in the FIFA 100 list of the world's greatest living players. According to Pelé, generally considered the best player ever, "throughout the years, the one player that came closest to me was Zico"
1982 Jessica Biel an American actress. Biel began her career as a vocalist appearing in musical productions until she was cast as Mary Camden in the family-drama series 7th Heaven, for which she achieved recognition. The series is the longest-running series that ever aired on The WB channel and is the longest-running family drama in television history

Top 7 most famous people died on March 3

1605 Pope Clement VIII Pope from 30 January 1592 to his death in 1605.
1703 Robert Hooke an English natural philosopher, architect and polymath.
1707 Aurangzeb the sixth Mughal Emperor and ruled over most of the Indian subcontinent. His reign lasted for 49 years from 1658 until his death in 1707. Aurangzeb was a notable expansionist and during his reign, the Mughal Empire reached its greatest extent. He was among the wealthiest of the Mughal rulers with an annual yearly tribute of £38,624,680. He was a pious Muslim, and his policies partly abandoned the legacy of Akbar's secularism, which remains a very controversial aspect of his reign. During his lifetime, victories in the south expanded the Mughal Empire to more than 3.2 million square kilometres and he ruled over a population estimated as being in the range of 100–150 million subjects. However, his wars led to the exhaustion of the imperial Mughal treasury and death of approximately 4.6 million people, mostly civilians. He was a strong and effective ruler, but with his death the great period of the Mughal Empire came to an end, and central control of the sub-continent declined rapidly
1983 Hergé a Belgian cartoonist. His best known and most substantial work is the 23 completed comic books in The Adventures of Tintin series, which he made from 1929 until his death in 1983. He was also responsible for two other well-known series, Quick & Flupke and Jo, Zette and Jocko. His works were executed in his distinct ligne claire drawing style
1987 Danny Kaye an American actor, singer, dancer, and comedian. His performances featured physical comedy, idiosyncratic pantomimes, and rapid-fire nonsense songs
1996 Marguerite Duras a French writer and film director.
2010 Michael Foot a British Labour Party politician and man of letters. He was a Member of Parliament from 1945 to 1955 and from 1960 until 1992. He was deputy leader of the Labour Party from 1976 to 1980, and later became the Leader of the Opposition from 1980 to 1983