March 1903 in history

March 1903 events chronologically

Mar 2 In New York City the Martha Washington Hotel opens, becoming the first hotel exclusively for women
Mar 14 The Hay–Herrán Treaty, granting the United States the right to build the Panama Canal, is ratified by the United States Senate. The Colombian Senate would later reject the treaty
Mar 14 The Pelican Island National Wildlife Refuge is established by US President Theodore Roosevelt
Mar 31 Richard Pearse allegedly makes a powered flight in an early aircraft

Top 7 most famous people born in March 1903

Mar 10 Bix Beiderbecke an American jazz cornetist, jazz pianist, and composer.
Mar 10 Clare Boothe Luce the first American woman appointed to a major ambassadorial post abroad. A versatile author, she is best known for her 1936 hit play The Women, which had an all-female cast. Her writings extended from drama and screen scenarios to fiction, journalism, and war reportage. She was the wife of Henry Luce, publisher of Time, Life, and Fortune
Mar 14 Mustafa Barzani a Kurdish nationalist leader, and the most prominent political figure in modern Kurdish politics. In 1946, he was chosen as the leader of the Kurdistan Democratic Party to lead the Kurdish revolution against Iraqi regimes. Barzani was the primary political and military leader of the Kurdish revolution until his death in March 1979. He led campaigns of armed struggle against both the Iraqi and Iranian governments
Mar 16 Mike Mansfield an American politician and diplomat. A member of the Democratic Party, he served as a U.S. Representative and a U.S. Senator from Montana. He was the longest-serving Senate Majority Leader, serving from 1961 to 1977. During his tenure, he shepherded Great Society programs through the Senate and strongly opposed the Vietnam War
Mar 18 Galeazzo Ciano Foreign Minister of Fascist Italy from 1936 until 1943 and Benito Mussolini's son-in-law. On 11 January 1944 Count Ciano was shot by firing squad at the behest of his father-in-law, Mussolini, under pressure from Nazi Germany. Ciano left a massive diary, that has been used among others by William Shirer in his monumental The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich and in the 4-hour HBO docu-drama Mussolini and I
Mar 24 Adolf Butenandt a German biochemist. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1939 for his "work on sex hormones." He initially rejected the award in accordance with government policy, but accepted it in 1949 after World War II
Mar 24 Malcolm Muggeridge an English journalist, author, media personality, and satirist. During World War II, he worked for the British government as a soldier and a spy. As a young man, Muggeridge was a left-wing sympathiser but he later became a forceful anti-communist. He is credited with bringing Mother Teresa to popular attention in the West and stimulating debate about Catholic theology. In his later years he became a religious and moral campaigner

Top 7 most famous people died in March 1903

Mar 2 Gustav Radde a German naturalist and explorer.
Mar 3 František Ladislav Rieger a Czech politician and publicist made famous for his leadership of the early Czech nationalist movement.
Mar 5 Gaston Paris a French writer and scholar. He was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1901, 1902 and 1903
Mar 10 Sophie Gengembre Anderson a French-born British artist who specialised in genre painting of children and women, typically in rural settings. She began her career as a lithographer and painter of portraits, collaborating with Walter Anderson on portraits of American Episcopalian bishops. Her work, Elaine, was the first public collection purchase of a woman artist. Her painting No Walk Today was purchased for more than £1 million
Mar 16 Roy Bean an eccentric U.S. saloon-keeper and Justice of the Peace in Val Verde County, Texas, who called himself "The Law West of the Pecos". According to legend, Judge Roy Bean held court in his saloon along the Rio Grande on a desolate stretch of the Chihuahuan Desert of southwest Texas. After his death, Western films and books cast him as a hanging judge, though he is known to have sentenced only two men to hang, one of whom escaped
Mar 28 Émile Baudot one of the pioneers of telecommunications. He invented a multiplexed printing telegraph system that used his code and allowed multiple transmissions over a single line. The baud unit was named after him
Mar 29 Gustavus Franklin Swift founded a meat-packing empire in the Midwest during the late 19th century, over which he presided until his death. He is credited with the development of the first practical ice-cooled railroad car, which allowed his company to ship dressed meats to all parts of the country and abroad, ushering in the "era of cheap beef." Swift pioneered the use of animal by-products for the manufacture of soap, glue, fertilizer, various types of sundries, and even medical products