March 2005 in history

March 2005 events chronologically

Mar 1 U.S. Supreme Court rules that the execution of juveniles found guilty of murder is unconstitutional marking a change in "national standards,"
Mar 3 Steve Fossett becomes the first person to fly an airplane non-stop around the world solo without refueling
Mar 3 Mayerthorpe tragedy: James Roszko murders four Royal Canadian Mounted Police constables during a drug bust at his property in Rochfort Bridge, Alberta, then commits suicide. It is the deadliest peace-time incident for the RCMP since 1885 and the North-West Rebellion
Mar 10 Tung Chee-hwa resigns from his post as the first Chief Executive of Hong Kong after widespread public dissatisfaction of his tenure
Mar 12 Karolos Papoulias becomes President of Greece
Mar 16 Israel officially hands over Jericho to Palestinian control
Mar 23 Texas City Refinery explosion: During a test on a distillation tower liquid waste builds up and flows out of a blowout tower. Waste fumes ignite and explode killing 15 workers

Top 7 most famous people died in March 2005

Mar 3 Rinus Michels a Dutch association football player and coach. He played his entire career for the club Ajax Amsterdam, which he later coached, and was a member of the Netherlands national team both as a player and as manager
Mar 6 Hans Bethe a German and American nuclear physicist who, in addition to making important contributions to astrophysics, quantum electrodynamics and solid-state physics, won the 1967 Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on the theory of stellar nucleosynthesis.
Mar 8 Aslan Maskhadov a leader of the Chechen independence movement and the third President of the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria.
Mar 17 George F. Kennan an American adviser, diplomat, political scientist, and historian, best known as "the father of containment" and as a key figure in the emergence of the Cold War. He later wrote standard histories of the relations between Soviet Union and the Western powers. He was also a core member of the group of foreign policy elders known as "The Wise Men"
Mar 22 Kenzō Tange a Japanese architect, and winner of the 1987 Pritzker Prize for architecture. He was one of the most significant architects of the 20th century, combining traditional Japanese styles with modernism, and designed major buildings on five continents. Tange was also an influential patron of the Metabolist movement. He said: "It was, I believe, around 1959 or at the beginning of the sixties that I began to think about what I was later to call structuralism", , a reference to the architectural movement known as Dutch Structuralism
Mar 26 James Callaghan the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1976 to 1979 and Leader of the Labour Party from 1976 to 1980. Callaghan is to date the only politician in history to have served in all four of the "Great Offices of State", having been Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1964 to 1967, Home Secretary from 1967 to 1970, and Foreign Secretary from 1974, until his appointment as Prime Minister in 1976
Mar 31 Terri Schiavo case a legal struggle involving prolonged life support in the United States that lasted from 1990 to 2005. The issue was whether to carry out the decision of the husband and legal guardian of Theresa Marie "Terri" Schiavo to remove Terri's feeding tube that provided life support. Terri was diagnosed by multiple physicians, including independent court-appointed physicians, as being in a persistent vegetative state, though this diagnosis was challenged by her parents and physicians hired by her parents. The highly publicized and prolonged series of legal challenges presented by her parents and by state and federal legislative intervention caused a seven-year delay before her feeding tube was ultimately removed