Died in March

March 31, 32 Titus Pomponius Atticus born Titus Pomponius , came from an old but not strictly noble Roman family of the equestrian class and the Gens Pomponia. He was a celebrated editor, banker, and patron of letters with residences in both Rome and Athens. He is best remembered as the closest friend of orator and philosopher Marcus Tullius Cicero as well leading contemporaries of upper class Roman society. Cicero's treatise on friendship, De Amicitia was dedicated to him. Their correspondence, often written in subtle code to disguise their political observations, is preserved in Epistulae ad Atticum compiled by Cicero's freedman and personal secretary, Marcus Tullius Tiro. Atticus was known for his elegant taste, sound judgment and financial acumen
March 15, 44 Julius Caesar a Roman general, statesman, Consul, and notable author of Latin prose. He played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire. In 60 BC, Caesar, Crassus, and Pompey formed a political alliance that was to dominate Roman politics for several years. Their attempts to amass power through populist tactics were opposed by the conservative ruling class within the Roman Senate, among them Cato the Younger with the frequent support of Cicero. Caesar's victories in the Gallic Wars, completed by 51 BC, extended Rome's territory to the English Channel and the Rhine. Caesar became the first Roman general to cross both when he built a bridge across the Rhine and conducted the first invasion of Britain
March 17, 45 Titus Labienus a professional Roman soldier in the late Roman Republic. He served as Tribune of the Plebs in 63 BC, and is remembered as one of Julius Caesar's lieutenants, mentioned frequently in the accounts of his military campaigns. He was the father of Quintus Labienus
March 29, 87 Emperor Wu of Han the fifth emperor of the Han dynasty of China, ruling from 141 to 87 BC.
March 30, 116 Quirinus of Neuss venerated as a martyr and saint of the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches. His cult was centered at Neuss in Germany, though he was a Roman martyr
March 7, 161 Antoninus Pius Roman Emperor from 138 to 161. He was a member of the Nerva–Antonine dynasty and the Aurelii
March 17, 180 Marcus Aurelius Roman Emperor from 161 to 180. He ruled with Lucius Verus as co-emperor from 161 until Verus' death in 169. He was the last of the Five Good Emperors, and is also considered one of the most important Stoic philosophers
March 28, 193 Pertinax Roman Emperor for three months in 193. He is known as the first emperor of the tumultuous Year of the Five Emperors. A high-ranking military and Senatorial figure, he tried to restore discipline in the Praetorian Guards, whereupon they rebelled and killed him. Upon his death he was succeeded by Didius Julianus, whose reign was similarly short
March 15, 220 Cao Cao a warlord and the penultimate Chancellor of the Eastern Han dynasty who rose to great power in the final years of the dynasty. As one of the central figures of the Three Kingdoms period, he laid the foundations for what was to become the state of Cao Wei and was posthumously honoured as "Emperor Wu of Wei". Although he is often portrayed as a cruel and merciless tyrant, Cao Cao has also been praised as a brilliant ruler and military genius who treated his subordinates like his family. He was also skilled in poetry and martial arts and wrote many war journals
March 11, 222 Julia Soaemias a Syrian noblewoman and the mother of Roman emperor Elagabalus who ruled over the Roman Empire during her son's reign.
March 11, 222 Elagabalus Roman Emperor from 218 to 222. A member of the Severan Dynasty, he was Syrian, the second son of Julia Soaemias and Sextus Varius Marcellus. In his early youth he served as a priest of the god Elagabal in the hometown of his mother's family, Emesa. As a private citizen, he was probably named Sextus Varius Avitus Bassianus. Upon becoming emperor he took the name Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus. He was called Elagabalus only after his death
March 19, 235 Alexander Severus Roman Emperor from 222 to 235. Alexander was the last emperor of the Severan dynasty. He succeeded his cousin Elagabalus upon the latter's assassination in 222, and was ultimately assassinated himself, marking the epoch event for the Crisis of the Third Century — nearly fifty years of civil wars, foreign invasion, and collapse of the monetary economy
March 5, 254 Pope Lucius I the Bishop of Rome from 25 June 253 to his death in 254.
March 22, 264 Pope Dionysius of Alexandria Saint Dionysius of Alexandria, named "the Great," 14th Pope of Alexandria & Patriarch of the See of Mark from December 28th, 248 until his death on March 22nd, 264 after seventeen years as a bishop. He was the first Pope to hold the title "the Great". Dionysius' large surviving correspondence provides most of our information about him. Only one original letter survives to this day; the remaining letters are excerpted in the works of Eusebius
March 2, 274 Mani (prophet) now extinct. Mani was born in or near Seleucia-Ctesiphon in Parthian Babylonia , at the time still part of the Parthian Empire. Six of his major works were written in Syriac Aramaic, and the seventh, dedicated to the king of the empire, Shapur I, was written in Middle Persian, his native language. He died in Gundeshapur, under the Sassanid Empire
March 12, 295 Maximilian (martyr) a Christian saint whose feast day is observed on 12 March. He is a martyr of the Christian Church from the third century AD, born in AD 274. Because his father Fabius Victor was a soldier in the Roman army, Maximilian was obliged to join at the age of 21. Brought before the proconsul of Numidia Cassius Dion, he refused, stating that, as a Christian, he could not serve in the military. This led to his martyrdom by beheading on 12 March, AD 295, at the City of Thavaste , North Africa. He is noted as an early conscientious objector; the 1970s anti-Vietnam War clergy group Order of Maximilian took their name from him
March 7, 308 Saint Eubulus martyred March 7, 308 at Caesarea Palestina.
March 14, 313 Emperor Huai of Jin an emperor of the Jin Dynasty.
March 1, 317 Valerius Valens Roman Emperor from late 316 to March 1, 317. Valens had previously been dux limitis in Dacia
March 30, 365 Emperor Ai of Jin an emperor of the Eastern Jin Dynasty. During his brief reign, the actual powers were largely in the hands of his granduncle Sima Yu the Prince of Kuaiji, and the paramount general Huan Wen. According to historical accounts, he had an obsession with immortality, which ironically resulted in his death, as he became poisoned by pills that were given him by magicians in 364 and eventually died in 365
March 7, 413 Heraclianus a provincial governor and a usurper of the Roman Empire opposed to Emperor Honorius.
March 12, 417 Pope Innocent I Pope from 401 to his death in 417.
March 16, 455 Valentinian III Western Roman Emperor from 425 to 455. His reign was marked by the ongoing dismemberment of the Western Empire
March 4, 480 Landry of Sées a French saint and bishop. The earliest record found of a person named Landry was in the 5th Century 450 in the person of Landry, third Bishop of Sées who died on March 4, 480 and whose feast day is July 16
March 10, 483 Pope Simplicius pope from 468 to his death in 483. He was born in Tivoli, Italy, the son of a citizen named Castinus. Most of what is known of him is derived from the Liber Pontificalis
March 3, 532 Winwaloe the founder and first abbot of Landévennec Abbey , also known as the Monastery of Winwaloe. It was just south of Brest in Brittany, now part of France
March 22, 542 Benedict of Nursia a Christian saint, honoured by the Catholic Church and the Anglican Church as the patron saint of Europe and students.
March 4, 561 Pope Pelagius I Pope from 556 to his death in 561. He was the second pope of the Byzantine Papacy, and like his predecessor, a former apocrisiarius to Constantinople
March 24, 588 Carláen the Bishop of Armagh, Ireland from 578 to 588.
March 1, 589 Saint David a Welsh bishop of Menevia during the 6th century; he was later regarded as a saint. He is the patron saint of Wales. David was a native of Wales, and a relatively large amount of information is known about his life. However, his birth date is uncertain: suggestions range from 462 to 512. The Welsh annals place his death 569 years after the birth of Christ, but Phillimore's dating revised this to 601
March 13, 600 Leander of Seville the Catholic Bishop of Seville who was instrumental in effecting the conversion to Catholicism of the Visigothic kings Hermengild and Reccared of Hispania.
March 12, 604 Pope Gregory I Pope from 3 September 590 to his death in 604. Gregory is well known for his writings, which were more prolific than those of any of his predecessors as pope. He is also known as Gregory the Dialogist in Eastern Christianity because of his Dialogues. For this reason, English translations of Eastern texts will sometimes list him as "Gregory Dialogus"
March 17, 624 Amr ibn Hishām one of the Meccan polytheist pagan Qurayshi leaders known for his hostility against the Islamic prophet Muhammad and the early Muslims in Mecca. He was one of the arch-enemies of Muḥammad and the flag-bearer of disbelief and hatred towards Islam and the early Muslims. His malevolence and enmity was to such an extent that Muhammad gave him the title of ‘The Pharaoh of this Ummah’. Muhammad also said, “He who calls Abu Jahl 'Abu Hakam' has made a serious mistake. He should seek forgiveness from Allah for this.”
March 11, 638 Sophronius of Jerusalem venerated as a saint in the Catholic and the Eastern Orthodox Churches. Before rising to the primacy of the see of Jerusalem, he was a monk and theologian who was the chief protagonist for orthodox teaching in the doctrinal controversy on the essential nature of Jesus and his volitional acts
March 2, 640 Bilal Ibn Rabah one of the most trusted and loyal Sahabah of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. He was born in Mecca and is considered as the first muezzin, chosen by Muhammad himself. Born as a slave, Bilal was among the emancipated slaves freed by Abu Bakr due to the Islamic teachings of slavery. He was known for his beautiful voice with which he called people to their prayers. He died sometime between 638 to 642, when he was just over sixty years old. Bilal ibn Rabah, rose to a position of prominence in Islam. His respected stature during the birth of Islam is often cited by Muslims as evidence of the importance of pluralism and racial equality in the foundations of the religion
March 8, 647 Felix of Burgundy a saint and the first bishop of the East Angles. He is widely credited as the man who introduced Christianity to the kingdom of East Anglia. Almost all that is known about the saint originates from The Ecclesiastical History of the English People, completed by Bede in about 731, and the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Bede praised Felix for delivering "all the province of East Anglia from long-standing unrighteousness and unhappiness"
March 17, 659 Gertrude of Nivelles a seventh-century abbess who, with her mother Itta, founded the Benedictine monastery of Nivelles in present-day Belgium. Although she was never formally canonized, in 1677 Pope Clement XII declared her universal feast day to be March 17. She is the patron saint of travelers, gardeners, and cats, and against rats and mental illness
March 9, 670 Hasan ibn Ali an important figure in Islam. He is the son of Ali and Fatimah. The latter is the daughter of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. After his father's death, he briefly succeeded him as the Caliph , before retiring to Madinah and entering into an agreement with the first Umayyad ruler, Muawiyah ibn Abi Sufyan, who assumed the Caliphate. Hasan is one of the five people of the Ahl al-Kisa, as well as a member of the Ahl al-Bayt. Hasan ibn Ali is 2nd Imam of Shia Islam. Hasan is also highly respected by the Sunni as the grandson of Muhammad
March 2, 672 Chad of Mercia a prominent 7th century Anglo-Saxon churchman, who became abbot of several monasteries, Bishop of the Northumbrians and subsequently Bishop of the Mercians and Lindsey People. He was later canonised as a saint. He was the brother of Cedd, also a saint. He features strongly in the work of Bede the Venerable and is credited, together with Cedd, with introducing Christianity to the Mercian kingdom
March 20, 687 Cuthbert a saint of the early Northumbrian church in the Celtic tradition. He was a monk, bishop and hermit, associated with the monasteries of Melrose and Lindisfarne in what might loosely be termed the Kingdom of Northumbria in the Northeast of England. After his death he became one of the most important medieval saints of Northern England, with a cult centred on his tomb at Durham Cathedral. Cuthbert is regarded as the patron saint of northern England. His feast day is 20 March
March 27, 710 Rupert of Salzburg a saint in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches and a founder of the Austrian city of Salzburg. He was a contemporary of Childebert III, king of the Franks
March 22, 752 Pope Zachary reigned from 10 December 741 to his death in 752. A Greek from Santa Severina, Calabria, he was the last pope of the Byzantine Papacy. Most probably he was a deacon of the Roman Church and as such signed the decrees of the Roman council of 732 and was on intimate terms with Gregory III, whom he succeeded on 5 December 741
March 26, 752 Pope-elect Stephen a Roman priest elected pope in March 752 to succeed Zachary; he died of a stroke a few days later, before being ordained a bishop. In 745, Zachary had made him a cardinal presbyter, with the titulus of San Crisogono, the same titulus later held by Cardinal Frederick of Lorraine, who became Pope Stephen IX
March 6, 757 Baldred of Tyninghame a Northumbrian hermit and abbot, resident in East Lothian during the 8th century.
March 17, 787 Han Huang an official of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty, serving as a chancellor during the reign of Emperor Dezong. He was praised by traditional historians for his frugality and personal integrity, but blamed for being overly harsh and cruel in his governance
March 24, 809 Harun al-Rashid the fifth Abbasid Caliph. His birth date is debated, with various sources giving dates from 763 to 766. His surname translates to "the Just", "the Upright", or "the Rightly-Guided". Al-Rashid ruled from 786 to 809, during the peak of the Islamic Golden Age. His time was marked by scientific, cultural, and religious prosperity. Islamic art and music also flourished significantly during his reign. He established the legendary library Bayt al-Hikma in Baghdad in modern-day Iraq, and during his rule Baghdad began to flourish as a center of knowledge, culture and trade. During his rule, the family of Barmakids, which played a deciding role in establishing the Abbasid Caliphate, declined gradually. In 796, he moved his court and government to Ar-Raqqah in modern-day Syria
March 26, 809 Ludger a missionary among the Frisians and Saxons, founder of Werden Abbey and first Bishop of Münster in Westphalia.
March 12, 817 Theophanes the Confessor a member of the Byzantine aristocracy, who became a monk and chronicler. He is venerated on March 12 in the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Roman Catholic Church
March 11, 824 Óengus of Tallaght held to be the author of the Félire Óengusso and possibly the Martyrology of Tallaght.
March 24, 832 Wulfred an Anglo-Saxon Archbishop of Canterbury in medieval England. Nothing is known of his life prior to 803, when he attended a church council, but he was probably a nobleman from Middlesex. He was elected archbishop in 805 and spent his time in office reforming the clergy of his cathedral. He also quarrelled with two consecutive Mercian kings – Coenwulf and Ceolwulf – over whether laymen or clergy should control monasteries. At one point, Wulfred travelled to Rome to consult with the papacy and was deposed from office for a number of years over the issue. After Coenwulf's death, relations were somewhat better with the new king Ceolwulf, but improved much more after Ceolwulf's subsequent deposition. The dispute about control of the monasteries was not fully settled until 838, after Wulfred's death. Wulfred was the first archbishop to place his portrait on the coinage he struck