Died on May 3

369 Juvenal of Narni venerated as the first Bishop of Narni in Umbria. Historical details regarding Juvenal’s life are limited. A biography of Juvenal of little historical value was written after the seventh century; it states that Juvenal was born in Africa and was ordained by Pope Damasus I and was the first bishop of Narni and was buried in the Porta Superiore on the Via Flaminia on August 7, though his feast day was celebrated on May 3. This Vita does not call him a martyr but calls him a confessor. The martyrologies of Florus of Lyon and Ado describe Juvenal as a bishop and confessor rather than as a martyr
762 Emperor Xuanzong of Tang the seventh emperor of the Tang dynasty in China, reigning from 712 to 756. His reign of 43 years was the longest during the Tang Dynasty. In the early half of his reign he was a diligent and astute ruler, ably assisted by capable chancellors like Yao Chong and Song Jing, and was credited with bringing Tang China to a pinnacle of culture and power
886 Wulgrin I of Angoulême the Count of Angoulême, Périgueux, and possible Saintonge from 866 to his death. His parents were Vulfard , Count of Flavigny, and Suzanne, who was a daughter of the Bego I, Count of Paris. His brother Hilduin the Young was the abbot of Saint-Denis. Ademar of Chabannes is the chief source on his active reign in preserving and moulding Angoulême
1152 Matilda of Boulogne suo jure Countess of Boulogne. She was also queen consort of England as the wife of King Stephen
1270 Béla IV of Hungary King of Hungary and Croatia between 1235 and 1270, and Duke of Styria from 1254 to 1258. Being the oldest son of King Andrew II, he was crowned upon the initiative of a group of influential noblemen in his father's lifetime in 1214. His father, who strongly opposed Béla's coronation, refused to give him a province to rule up until 1220. In this year, Béla was appointed Duke of Slavonia, also with jurisdiction in Croatia and Dalmatia. Around the same time, Béla married Maria, a daughter of Theodore I Laskaris, Emperor of Nicaea. From 1226, he governed Transylvania with the title Duke. He supported Christian missions among the pagan Cumans who dwelled in the plains to the east of his province. Some Cuman chieftains acknowledged his suzerainty and he adopted the title of King of Cumania in 1233. King Andrew died on 21 September 1235 and Béla succeeded him. He attempted to restore royal authority, which had diminished under his father. For this purpose, he revised his predecessors' land grants and reclaimed former royal estates, causing discontent among the noblemen and the prelates
1294 John I Duke of Brabant Duke of Brabant , Lothier and Limburg.
1410 Antipope Alexander V antipope during the Western Schism. He reigned from June 26, 1409, to his death in 1410 and is officially regarded by the Roman Catholic Church as an antipope
1459 Eric of Pomerania King Eric III of Norway , King Eric VII of Denmark , and King Eric of Sweden. He was the first King of the Nordic Kalmar Union, succeeding his adoptive mother Margaret I of Denmark
1481 Mehmed the Conqueror an Ottoman sultan who ruled first for a short time from August 1444 to September 1446, and later from February 1451 to May 1481. At the age of 21, he conquered Constantinople and brought an end to the Byzantine Empire. Mehmed continued his conquests in Anatolia with its reunification, and in Southeast Europe as far west as Bosnia. Being a highly regarded conqueror, Mehmed is considered a hero in modern-day Turkey and parts of the wider Muslim world. Among other things, Istanbul's Fatih district, Fatih Sultan Mehmet Bridge and Fatih Mosque are named after him
1489 Stanisław Kazimierczyk a Polish Roman Catholic canon regular, theologian and preacher.
1514 Anna of Brandenburg a German noblewoman.
1528 Clarice de' Medici the daughter of Piero di Lorenzo de' Medici and Alfonsina Orsini.
1543 Altobello Melone an Italian painter of the Renaissance.
1570 Pietro Loredan (doge) the 84th Doge of Venice. He reigned from 1567 to 1570
1589 Julius Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg prince of Wolfenbüttel from 1568 until his death.
1598 Anna Guarini an Italian virtuoso singer of the late Renaissance. She was one of the most renowned singers of the age, and was one of the four concerto di donne at the Ferrara court of the d'Este family, for whom many composers wrote in a progressive style
1606 Henry Garnet an English Jesuit priest executed for his complicity in the Gunpowder Plot of 1605. Born in Heanor, Derbyshire, he was educated in Nottingham and later at Winchester College, before he moved to London in 1571, to work for a publisher. There he professed an interest in legal studies, and in 1575 he travelled to the continent and joined the Society of Jesus. He was ordained in Rome some time around 1582
1663 Johan Björnsson Printz governor from 1643 until 1653 of the Swedish colony of New Sweden on the Delaware River in North America.
1678 Bernhard II Duke of Saxe-Jena duke of Saxe-Jena.
1679 James Sharp (bishop) a Scottish minister, and later Archbishop of St Andrews.
1693 Claude de Rouvroy duc de Saint-Simon the second son of Louis de Rouvroy, seigneur du Plessis , who had been a warm supporter of Henry of Guise and the Catholic League.
1703 Eglon van der Neer a Dutch painter of historical scenes, portraits and elegant, fashionable people, and later of landscapes.
1704 Heinrich Ignaz Franz Biber a Bohemian-Austrian composer and violinist. Born in the small Bohemian town of Wartenberg , Biber worked at Graz and Kroměříž before he illegally left his Kremsier employer and settled in Salzburg. He remained there for the rest of his life, publishing much of his music but apparently seldom, if ever, giving concert tours
1719 Pierre Le Gros the Younger a French sculptor, active almost exclusively in Baroque Rome. Nowadays, his name is commonly written Legros, while he himself always signed as Le Gros; he is frequently referred to either as 'the Younger' or 'Pierre II' to distinguish him from his father, Pierre Le Gros the Elder, who was also a sculptor. The "ardent drama" of his work and its Italian location make him more an Italian, than a French, sculptor. Despite being virtually unknown to the general public today, he was the pre-eminent sculptor in Rome for nearly two decades, until he was finally superseded at the end of his life by the more classicizing Camillo Rusconi
1724 John Leverett the Younger an early American lawyer, politician, educator, and President of Harvard College.
1747 Francesco Solimena a prolific Italian painter of the Baroque era, one of an established family of painters and draughtsmen.
1750 John Willison an evangelical minister of the Church of Scotland and a writer of Christian literature.
1752 Samuel Ogle the 16th, 18th and 20th Proprietary Governor of Maryland from 1731 to 1732, 1733 to 1742, and 1746/1747 to 1752.
1758 Pope Benedict XIV Pope from 17 August 1740 to his death in 1758.
1763 George Psalmanazar claimed to be the first Formosan to visit Europe. For some years he convinced many in Britain, but was later revealed to be an impostor. He later became a theological essayist and a friend and acquaintance of Samuel Johnson and other noted figures of 18th-century literary London
1764 Francesco Algarotti a Venetian polymath, philosopher, poet, essayist, anglophile, art critic and art collector. He was "one of the first Esprits cavaliers of the age," a man of broad knowledge, an expert in Newtonianism, architecture and music and a friend of most of the leading authors of his times: Voltaire, Jean-Baptiste de Boyer, Marquis d'Argens, Pierre-Louis de Maupertuis and the atheist Julien Offray de La Mettrie
1779 John Winthrop (educator) the 2nd Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy in Harvard College. He was a distinguished mathematician, physicist and astronomer, born in Boston, Mass. His great-great-grandfather, also named John Winthrop, was founder of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He graduated in 1732 from Harvard, where, from 1738 until his death he served as professor of mathematics and natural philosophy. Professor Winthrop was one of the foremost men of science in America during the 18th century, and his impact on its early advance in New England was particularly significant. Both Benjamin Franklin and Benjamin Thompson probably owed much of their early interest in scientific research to his influence. He also had a decisive influence in the early philosophical education of John Adams, during the latter's time at Harvard. He corresponded regularly with the Royal Society in London—as such, one of the first American intellectuals of his time to be taken seriously in Europe. He was noted for attempting to explain the great Lisbon earthquake of 1755 as a scientific—rather than religious—phenomenon, and his application of mathematical computations to earthquake activity following the great quake has formed the basis of the claim made on his behalf as the founder of the science of seismology. Additionally, he observed the transits of Mercury in 1740 and 1761 and journeyed to Newfoundland to observe a transit of Venus. He traveled in a ship provided by the Province of Massachusetts - probably the first scientific expedition ever sent out by any incipient American state
1783 Prince Octavius of Great Britain the 13th child and eighth son of King George III and his queen consort Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. Six months after the death of his brother Prince Alfred, Octavius was inoculated with the smallpox virus. Several days later, he became ill. His subsequent death at the age of four devastated his parents, and in particular his father. George bemoaned his son's death, of whom he was exceedingly fond; the king's later bouts of madness would involve hallucinations of his young son
1793 Martin Gerbert born at Horb am Neckar, Württemberg, on the 12th of August 1720.
1816 James McHenry an Irish-born American statesman. McHenry was a signer of the United States Constitution from Maryland and the namesake of Fort McHenry. He was a delegate to the Continental Congress from Maryland, and the third United States Secretary of War , under the first and second presidents, George Washington, and John Adams
1834 Aleksey Arakcheyev a Russian general and statesman under the reign of Alexander I.
1839 Ferdinando Paer an Italian composer known for his operas and oratorios. He was of Austrian descent and used the German spelling Pär in application for printing in Venice, and later in France the spelling Paër
1839 Pehr Henrik Ling pioneered the teaching of physical education in Sweden. Ling is often mistakenly credited as the father of Swedish massage, who is in fact Johann Georg Mezger
1843 Sir Thomas Hislop 1st Baronet a senior British Army officer of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Serving exclusively in colonial campaigns, Hislop fought in the West Indies between 1796 and 1810 and subsequently in India, where he was a senior commander during the Third Anglo-Maratha War. Although his ability as a general was praised, Hislop came under criticism in Parliament for his heavy reprisals against forces of the Maratha Empire, particularly at Talnar, where he ordered the execution of over 300 men. He was also known for financial profligacy, losing large sums of money investing unsuccessfully in the Americas. Despite these problems, Hislop was later made a baronet and a Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath, serving in his retirement as an equerry to Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge
1844 Nicolas Chopin a teacher of French language in Prussian- and Russian-ruled Poland, and father of Polish composer Frédéric Chopin.
1845 Thomas Hood a British humorist and poet. His son, Tom Hood, became a well known playwright and editor
1848 Hans Ernst Karl Graf von Zieten an officer in the Prussian Army during the Napoleonic Wars.
1852 Sara Coleridge an English author and translator. She was the third child and only daughter of Samuel Taylor Coleridge and his wife Sarah Fricker
1853 Juan Donoso Cortés a Spanish author, conservative and catholic political theorist, and diplomat. He was a descendant, through his father Pedro Donoso Cortés, of the conquistador Hernando Cortés
1856 Adolfo Fumagalli a 19th-century Italian virtuoso pianist and composer, known today primarily for his virtuosic compositions for the left hand alone.
1856 Adolphe Adam a French composer and music critic. A prolific composer of operas and ballets, he is best known today for his ballets Giselle and Le corsaire , his operas Le postillon de Lonjumeau , Le toréador and Si j'étais roi and his Christmas carol Minuit, chrétiens! , later set to different English lyrics and widely sung as "O Holy Night". Adam was a noted teacher, who taught Delibes and other influential composers
1858 Auguste Brizeux a French poet. He was said to belong to a family of Irish origin, long settled in Brittany. He was educated for the law, but in 1827 he produced at the Théâtre Français a one-act verse comedy, Racine, in collaboration with Philippe Busoni
1859 Anders Gustaf Dahlbom a Swedish entomologist.
1863 Elisha F. Paxton an American lawyer and soldier who served as a general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. He died in combat leading the famed Stonewall Brigade during the Battle of Chancellorsville
1867 Fanny Tacchinardi Persiani an Italian soprano particularly associated with bel canto composers, such as Rossini, Donizetti, Bellini, and early Verdi. Her 'golden' period in Paris and London was between 1837 and 1848